Advertiser Disclosure

Many of the credit card offers that appear on this site are from credit card companies from which we receive financial compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). However, the credit card information that we publish has been written and evaluated by experts who know these products inside out. We only recommend products we either use ourselves or endorse. This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers that are on the market. See our advertising policy here where we list advertisers that we work with, and how we make money. You can also review our credit card rating methodology.

The 20 Best Museums in Montréal, Canada [2024]

Amar Hussain's image
Amar Hussain
Amar Hussain's image

Amar Hussain

Senior Content Contributor

792 Published Articles

Countries Visited: 63U.S. States Visited: 9

Amar is an avid traveler and tester of products. He has spent the last 13 years traveling all 7 continents and has put the products to the test on each of them. He has contributed to publications incl...
Edited by: Jessica Merritt
Jessica Merritt's image

Jessica Merritt

Editor & Content Contributor

91 Published Articles 505 Edited Articles

Countries Visited: 4U.S. States Visited: 23

A long-time points and miles student, Jessica is the former Personal Finance Managing Editor at U.S. News and World Report and is passionate about helping consumers fund their travels for as little ca...
& Keri Stooksbury
Keri Stooksbury's image

Keri Stooksbury

Editor-in-Chief

35 Published Articles 3236 Edited Articles

Countries Visited: 47U.S. States Visited: 28

With years of experience in corporate marketing and as the executive director of the American Chamber of Commerce in Qatar, Keri is now editor-in-chief at UP, overseeing daily content operations and r...

We may be compensated when you click on product links, such as credit cards, from one or more of our advertising partners. Terms apply to the offers below. See our Advertising Policy for more about our partners, how we make money, and our rating methodology. Opinions and recommendations are ours alone.

As one of the largest cities in Canada, it’s not surprising that Montréal has some of the country’s best and most beloved museums. From art and culture to science and history, there’s a facility to suit anyone’s interests. Whether you’re planning a solo trip or a family getaway, here are the best museums in Montréal worth considering.

The Best Museums in Montréal

1. Afromuseum

Afromuseum
Image Credit: Afromuseum

Originally founded to document and preserve the culture and history of Canada’s Haitian and Afro-Canadian population, the Afromuseum in Montréal has become a center of art, history, and education.

This facility sets itself apart from others by not having a stored collection on-site. Instead, the museum works with its partners to showcase pieces in temporary exhibitions to highlight a wide range of cultures and stories.

Additionally, special events are a regular part of the museum’s calendar. Comedians, actors, writers, and people from other industries celebrate Haitian and African-Canadian traditions and identities at these events. Most are family-friendly, but make sure to check before arriving. Private events, like cocktail parties, conferences, and film screenings, can also be planned at the museum.

The museum is open Wednesday to Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission varies depending on eventual events or exhibitions on display. Donations are always welcome. The nearest bus stops are Ontario and Berri.

  • Address: 533 Ontario St. E., Montréal, Québec H2L 1N8, Canada

2. Arsenal Contemporary Art Montréal

Arsenal Contemporary Art Montreal
Image Credit: Arsenal Contemporary Art

With 3 locations across North America, Arsenal Contemporary Art is a leader in showcasing the most prominent names in the art world.

Since opening in 2004, Montréal’s location has grown to have one of the most important contemporary collections in the country. The facility’s exhibits showcase over 500 artists, including established and rising talents in the industry.

The site’s galleries showcase a wide range of mediums, from paintings and sculptures to multimedia installations. The “Collection Majudia” is one of the most popular permanent wings on-site, but the museum is also known for its temporary exhibitions, which rotate a few times throughout the year. Arsenal Contemporary Art Montréal also offers artist residency programs to highlight the talents of local creators, giving visitors a first look at their pieces.

The museum is open Thursday and Friday from 1:30 to 7 p.m., Saturday from 9.30 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday from 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free for children under 6, CA$10 (~$7) for kids 6 to 17, CA$12 (~$9) for students and seniors 65+, and CA$15 (~$11) for adults. The nearest bus stops are Notre-Dame and Georges-Vanier.

  • Address: 2020 William St., Montréal, Québec H3J 1R8, Canada

3. Barbie Expo

Barbie Expo
Image Credit: Susan Moss via Tourisme Montréal

Montréal’s Barbie Expo has grown to become one of the city’s most exciting pop-culture exhibits. With over 1,000 different Barbie Dolls on display, the expo is beloved by guests of all ages.

In addition to teaching visitors about the history of one of the world’s most famous toys, the Barbie Expo shows just how ingrained the doll is in the real world. Fashion lovers enjoy the progression of the doll’s style over the years, especially pieces that famous brands like Dior and Vera Wang designed.

Those who love learning about new cultures can see how Barbie has adapted to international markets. Art and culture lovers, on the other hand, can admire dolls and sets inspired by artists such as Van Gogh, brands like Coca-Cola, and celebrities like Elvis and Farrah Fawcett.

Barbie Expo is open Monday to Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Thursday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday from 12 to 5 p.m. Admission is free for everyone. The nearest metro stop is Peel.

  • Address: 1455 Peel St. Level 3, Montréal, Québec H3A 1T5, Canada

4. The Biosphère

The Biosphere
Image Credit: Dana Andreea Gheorghe via Unsplash

First opened in 1967 as a pavilion for the Expo 67 event, Montréal’s Biosphère is dedicated to the environment, its connection to society, and how the world develops. To promote awareness of people’s environmental impact, the facility uses a mixture of hands-on displays, photos, and actual greenery to encourage critical thinking and an interest in environmentalism.

All ages are welcome at the facility, and most exhibits offer explanations and visual representations of ideas so children and adults can both get the most out of the experience. This is also the largest structure of its kind in the world, with its shape making up over 75% of a complete sphere. There are no time limits for visitors, but plan to spend at least 2 hours on-site, especially if you intend to read and fully experience everything.

Montréal’s Biosphère is open Tuesday to Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Admission is free for children under 5, CA$12 (~$9) for kids 5 to 17, CA$17 (~$13) for students 18+, CA$21 (~$16) for seniors 65+, and CA$23.25 (~$18) for adults. The nearest metro stop is Jean-Drapeau.

  • Address: 160 Chem. du Tour de l’isle, Montréal, QC H3C 4G8, Canada

5. Canadian Centre for Architecture

Canadian Centre for Architecture
Image Credit: Mathieu Gagnon via Canadian Centre for Architecture

The Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) offers visitors a chance to see how the industry has progressed over time. Housing the largest collection of drawings, artifacts, and other pieces, the museum captures how architecture takes a concept and eventually transforms it into buildings.

The museum features influential architects from throughout history, like Ernest Cormier and Aldo Rossi. Still, it also features lesser-known designers who have greatly impacted how buildings have changed in appearance.

CCA also functions as a research facility, with a library of references available to the public. Additionally, the museum hosts lectures each year for both those interested in studying architecture and the general public. This museum also has a regularly updated online presence, where articles about the field are frequently published, which can add to your visit experience.

The museum is open Wednesday and Friday to Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Admission is free for students, children, members, first responders, and members of indigenous communities, CA$7 (~$5) for seniors 65+, and CA$10 (~$7) for adults. Ticket fees are waived for everyone on Thursdays and the first Sunday of the month. The nearest metro station is Georges-Vanier.

  • Address: 1920 Baile St., Montréal, Québec H3H 2S6, Canada

6. Centre des Mémoires Montréalaises

Centre des Memoires Montrealaises
Image Credit: Centre des Mémoires Montréalaises

MEM, the Centre des Mémoires Montréalaises, is dedicated to the city’s history and development over time. Spread across 3 different floors, the space uses artifacts like photographs, costumes, film clips, and everyday items to give visitors a peek into the daily lives of Montréal citizens since the city was first founded. MEM’s permanent collection on the ground floor highlights people, events, and places that helped make Montréal what it is today.

On floors 2 and 3, temporary exhibitions delve deeper into specific periods or topics. Special events are also hosted on these levels. Today, the site houses over 4,000 objects, many preserved over the past century. The galleries particularly well-document the Expo 67 fair.

MEM is open Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Wednesday to Friday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Access to featured exhibitions is free for children under 13, CA$6.70 (~$5) for teens 13 to 17, CA$10.90 (~$8) for students, CA$13.20 (~$10) for seniors 65+, and CA$15.50 (~$11) for adults 18+. The nearest metro stop is Saint-Laurent.

  • Address: 1210 St Laurent Blvd., Montréal, Québec H2X 2S5, Canada

7. Centre des Sciences de Montréal (Montréal Science Centre)

Montreal Science Centre
Image Credit: Montréal Science Centre

Montréal’s Science Centre first opened to the public in 2000 in the city’s port. Since then, it’s been one of the area’s most beloved places to learn about the sciences. The center fosters an interest in science and technology in visitors of all ages through interactive exhibits and an on-site IMAX theater.

Currently, 5 permanent exhibits that explore topics from evolution to outer space. There are also several temporary exhibitions on display at the center at any given time, which take a closer look at more niche topics, such as nature-inspired technology and how tech can be used in fields such as botany.

In addition to the special events hosted at the facility, which are primarily geared toward kids, the museum is also available for private parties.

Montréal’s science center is open Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Standard admission is free for children under 2 and members, CA$17.50 (~$13) for kids 2 to 12, CA$18 (~$13) for teens 13 to 17, and CA$27 (~$20) for adults. The nearest metro stop is Place-d’Armes.

  • Address: 2 De la Commune St. West, Montréal, Québec H2Y 4B2, Canada

8. Château Dufresne

Chateau Dufresne
Image Credit: Château Dufresne

Built as a sprawling French-inspired residence, Château Dufresne was constructed and furnished throughout the first half of the 1900s by the Dufresne entrepreneurs who wished to evoke their French heritage.

Château Dufresne’s permanent exhibit consists of its rooms, many of which still contain the items purchased by the Dufresne family. This exhibit showcases what a wealthy French-Canadian home would have looked like 100 years ago. Sitting rooms, bedrooms, and offices are just a few of the rooms that are open to public viewing.

Special exhibitions and events are also regularly hosted on the property and delve into specific periods, art styles, or artists related to the mansion and its furnishings. While the museum is a self-guided experience, guided tours are offered on weekend afternoons. Alternatively, arrangements can be made to reserve a special tour.

Château Dufresne is open Wednesday to Sunday from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free for members and kids under 6, CA$7 (~$5) for kids 6 to 17, CA$13 for seniors 65+ and students 18-30, and CA$14 (~$10) for adults. Québec residents can visit for free on the first Sunday of the month. The nearest metro stop is Pie-IX.

  • Address: 2929 Av. Jeanne-d’Arc, Montréal, QC H1W 3W2, Canada

9. Château Ramezay

Chateau Ramezay
Image Credit: Archéo-Québec via Château Ramezay

Built at the beginning of the 1700s as a residence for the governor, Château Ramezay was the first building in the city to be considered a historic structure. Since 1894, the mansion has been open to the public as a museum, though it was initially just a portrait gallery.

Today, the space houses paintings, sculptures, books, and furnishings from Montréal’s early history. In total, over 30,000 pieces are preserved at the château, either on display or in the archives.

There are 3 permanent exhibits on display:

  1. “Hochelaga,” which shows how Montréal developed during the 19th and 20th centuries in particular
  2. “Life at the Chateau,” which recreates what an 18th-century home would look like
  3. The “Multimedia Circuit,” which houses photos and videos

The staff also dresses in period-accurate costumes to add to the experience.

Château Ramezay is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free for children under 5, CA$6 (~$4) for kids 5 to 17, CA$10 (~$7) for students, CA$12 (~$9) for seniors 65+, and CA$14 (~$10) for adults. The metro stop is Champ-de-Mars.

  • Address: 280 Notre-Dame St. East, Montréal, Québec H2Y 1C5, Canada

10. Fonderie Darling

Fonderie Darling
Image Credit: Fonderie Darling

Since its opening in 2002, Fonderie Darling has been one of Montréal’s premier sites for contemporary art. Located in what was once an industrial foundry, the gallery is in what is now considered one of the most artsy parts of the city.

Rather than house a permanent collection, the museum regularly rotates its galleries to showcase both established and up-and-coming names in the art world. As a result, each visit ensures a different experience.

Mark Lewis, Barbara Steinman, and Elsa Werth are just some artists the museum space highlights. Notably, Fonderie Darling doesn’t focus on any specific art medium so long as the work being presented is contemporary in nature. Experimental work, including performance arts and technological installations, is most frequently showcased on the property.

Fonderie Darling is open Wednesday and Friday to Sunday from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. and Thursday from 12 p.m. to 10 p.m. Admission is CA$8 (~$6) for all visitors. The nearest metro stop is Square Victoria.

  • Address: 745 Ottawa St., Montréal, Québec H3C 1R8, Canada

11. Insectarium

Insectarium
Image Credit: Mélanie Dusseault via Espace pour la vie

Since its opening in 1990, the Insectarium has housed insect specimens from around the world, both alive and dead. Not only is the space the largest insectarium in North America, but it’s also the only facility of its kind that allows so many insects to roam freely in specially designed enclosures so visitors can observe how they live and interact with one another.

Butterflies, ants, worms, and bees are just some of the insects housed and displayed at the Insectarium. Through its exhibits, the museum aims to promote more positive feelings toward the insect world by showing how important they are to the environment.

Some of the highlighted species at the Insectarium are the “Orchid Praying Mantis,” the “Umtali Flower Beetle,” and the “Common Morpho” exhibits, which are all kept as live specimens.

The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free for children under 5, CA$12 (~$9) for kids 5 to 17, CA$17 (~$13) for students 18+, CA$21 (~$16) for seniors 65+, and CA$23.25 (~$17) for adults. The nearest metro stop is Pie-IX.

  • Address: 4581 Sherbrooke St. East, Montréal, Québec H1X 2B2, Canada

12. Marius Barbeau Center

Marius Barbeau Center
Image Credit: Marius Barbeau Center

Since its opening, the Marius Barbeau Center has aimed to collect and preserve the city’s culture and history. What sets the center apart from other cultural museums in the city is its focus on immaterial preservation methods. Rather than store concrete artifacts, the space preserves stories, songs, and traditions to celebrate history and culture.

Marius-Barbeau is broadly divided into 16 different departments, ranging from ethnology and legends to folk games and recipes. These topics are represented through 10,000 artifacts that help bring them to life. Each year, the space also hosts a variety of events that take a closer look at elements of local folk heritage and specific cultures from the Québec territory.

The museum is open Tuesday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Friday from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and Monday from 1 to 4:30 p.m. Admission is free for members, CA$3 (~$2) for seniors and students, and CA$6 (~$4) for adults. The nearest metro stop is Laurier, which is a 20-minute walk away.

  • Address: 4839 Rue de Bordeaux, Montréal, QC H2H 2A2, Canada

13. Montréal Biodôme

Montreal Biodome
Image Credit: Espace pour la vie

Originally built as a stadium for the 1976 Summer Olympics, Montréal’s Biodôme is a unique structure that simulates the 4 different ecosystems found in the continental Americas.

In particular, the space is divided into:

  • The “Tropical Forest,” meant to represent the rainforest of South America
  • The “Laurentian Forest,” which replicates the forests of North America
  • The “Saint Lawrence Marine Eco-system,” modeled after the coast of Prince Edward Island in Nova Scotia
  • The “Sub-Polar Region” is meant to recreate the Arctic

Each habitat in the Biodôme is home to a small variety of live animals that would be found in their real-life counterparts. Macaws are in the tropical section, penguins are in the polar wing, lynx are in the forest area, and fish swim in the marine wing.

Montréal’s Biodôme is open Tuesday to Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free for children under 5, CA$12 (~$9) for kids 5 to 17, CA$17 (~$13) for students 18+, CA$21 (~$16) for seniors 65+, CA$23.25 (~$17) for adults. The nearest metro station is Viau.

  • Address: 3805 Bd Curé-Labelle, Laval, QC H7P 0A5, Canada

14. Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (Montréal Museum of Contemporary Art)

Musee dart contemporain de Montreal
Image Credit: Félix Rioux via Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal

The Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (MAC) was the city’s first exhibit space specifically designated for contemporary works of art. Since its opening in the 1960s, the museum has acquired over 7,000 pieces from over 1,500 artists.

Though this artwork comes from around the world, the vast majority of pieces are from Canadian and Québecois artists. Half of the museum is dedicated to showcasing items from the permanent collection, which are rotated regularly. The other half is set aside for temporary exhibitions and special events.

Art mediums of all kinds are represented in the space, from drawings to film. Even performance arts have been featured. Some highlights are “Beaver Casino” by Kim Adams and “Great Moments in Modern Art II” by Robert Adrian X.

MAC is open Tuesday to Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Admission is free for visitors under 19, Canoo members, and visitors with disabilities, and CA$10 (~$7) for the general public. Fees are waived on the first Sunday of the month for Québec residents. The nearest metro stops are McGill and Bonaventure.

  • Address: niveau galerie commerciale, Pl. Ville-Marie local 11220, Montréal, QC H3B 3Y1, Canada

15. Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal (Montréal Museum of Fine Arts)

Musee des beaux arts de Montreal
Image Credit: Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal

Montréal’s Museum of Fine Arts, also known as MBAM and MMFA, is the country’s largest gallery space and the city’s most-visited museum.

The museum complex, spread across 5 different buildings, houses over 40,000 different pieces from around the world. This collection has been growing since the museum was founded in 1860, making it the oldest in Canada. Today, the museum is split into 6 main wings, which range from contemporary art to ancient and prehistoric artifacts.

Some of the highlighted pieces in the collection are Alberto Giacometti’s “Portrait of the Artist’s Mother,” William George Richardson Hind’s “The Game of Bones,” and a collection of daggers, rattles, and everyday items used by Canada’s historic indigenous people. Special exhibitions, lectures, and day camps are also regularly hosted on the property.

MBAM is open Thursday through Sunday and Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Admission is free for visitors under 20 and members, CA$16 (~$12) for adults 21 to 30, and CA$24 (~$18) for adults 31+. Tickets purchased online receive a CA$3 (~$2) discount. The nearest metro stop is Guy-Concordia.

  • Address: 1380 Sherbrooke St. West, Montréal, Québec H3G 1J5, Canada

“An exciting place of discovery, dialogue, and wonder, the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts offers something for everyone. With its extensive collection of paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, decorative arts, design, and more, the museum’s exhibitions and collections offer fresh and broad perspectives on art, its history, and our time. Whether you’re drawn to iconic figures of international art or intrigued by Canadian and Indigenous art, an inspiring and enriching experience awaits you.”

Mary-Dailey Desmarais, chief curator, Montréal Museum of Fine Arts

16. Musée des hospitalières de l’Hotel Dieu de Montréal (Museum of the Hospitallers of the Hôtel-Dieu of Montréal)

Musee des hospitalieres de lHotel Dieu de Montreal
Image Credit: Musée des hospitalières de l’Hotel Dieu de Montréal

The Musée des hospitalières de l’Hotel Dieu de Montréal depicts the history of Montréal through the lens of one of its oldest hospitals. Focusing specifically on healthcare and the medical sciences, the museum uses illustrations, documents, and artifacts to showcase 400 years of history.

Some highlighted pieces from the facility are “Women’s Ward,” a painting that depicts women being treated for illnesses, “La Sainte Famille,” and “Marie De La Ferre,” who was one of the most important figures in the hospital’s administration.

“Exploring a Hospital Heritage” is the museum’s permanent exhibit, which truly shows how the medical field has changed, especially in the last 100 years. Temporary galleries are also regularly hosted on the premises, which delve into specific periods or figures in Canadian medicine. Choose from 5 guided tours for a more in-depth visiting experience.

The museum is open Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free for children under 5, CA$5 (~$4) for kids 5 to 17, CA$10 (~$7) for students 18+ and seniors 65+, and CA$12 (~$9) for adults. The nearest bus stop is Des Pins and Basset.

  • Address: 201 Pine Ave. West, Montréal, Québec H2W 1R5, Canada

17. Musée McCord Stewart (McCord Stewart Museum)

Musee McCord Stewart
Image Credit: Musée McCord Stewart

First opened in 1921, the McCord Stewart Museum is a teaching and research center focusing on documentary art, costumes, fashion, textiles, Montréal’s indigenous populations, material culture, and photography.

Due to the museum’s multidisciplinary nature, the space houses a massive collection of over 2.5 million pieces. The largest collection is, by far, the Photography wing, which features photographic evidence of how Montréal has changed from the 1840s to the present day.

Some of the highlighted pieces from this collection specifically are “Stormy Day, Saint Catherine Street” and “Portrait of Peter Redpath,” both by William Notman, and “McGill College Avenue, Looking South from Sherbrooke Street” by Alexander Henderson. McCord also hosts temporary galleries each year, which display items on loan from other facilities as well as pieces from the museum archives.

The museum is open Tuesday and Thursday to Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. During the summer schedule, the museum is also open Mondays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Admission is free for members, children under 18, and members of indigenous communities, CA$15 (~$11) for students 18+, CA$19 (~$14) for seniors 65+, and CA$20 (~$15) for adults. A CA$2 (~$1) discount is available for tickets purchased online. Ticket fees are waived for select exhibits on Wednesday evenings and for Québec residents on the first Sunday of the month. The nearest metro stop is McGill.

  • Address: 690 Sherbrooke St. West, Montréal, Québec H3A 1E9, Canada

18. Musée Redpath (Redpath Museum)

Redpath Museum
Image Credit: Alex Tran via Musée Redpath

Commissioned by Peter Redpath, the Redpath Museum is a natural history exhibit space that contains items related to science fields, including biology, paleontology, and geology. Currently, the museum has 4 permanent collections, which display a portion of the millions of artifacts in its possession.

Some of the museum’s most famous pieces are “Gorgosaurus,” a dinosaur skeleton, fossilized scallops, and an anaconda skeleton. Temporary exhibits are also hosted on the premises, which offer a closer look at specific scientific topics and monumental figures in the field’s development.

Redpath Museum hosts group tours and special events for the public, but it’s also available for rent for private events like conferences and galas. Cultures from around the world are also celebrated, with artifacts dating back to ancient civilizations of Africa, Egypt, and the Mediterranean.

Redpath is open Tuesday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free, but a donation of CA$10 (~$7) for adults and CA$20 (~$15) for families is suggested. The nearest metro stop is Station Peel.

  • Address: 859 Sherbrooke St. West, Montréal, Québec H3A 0C4, Canada

19. Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours Chapel

Notre Dame de Bon Secours Chapel
Image Credit: Marguerite Bourgeoys Museum

Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours Chapel is one of the oldest churches in the city and is the site of the Marguerite Bourgeoys Museum. This exhibit space is dedicated to Marguerite Bourgeoys, who founded the church and was Montréal’s first teacher.

The museum’s collection of artifacts and documents depicts the church’s history and connection to Montréal’s society and culture. However, several items also showcase the area’s colonial history and the very first years of a French presence in Canada.

In addition to the museum wings and the chapel, the facility has an archeological site, which features all that remains of the first church ever built in Montréal. Special events, like workshops, lectures, and guided tours, are also held at the museum and change seasonally.

The museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free for all guests. The nearest metro stop is Champ-de-Mars.

  • Address: 400 Rue Saint-Paul East, Montréal, QC H2Y 1H4, Canada

20. Planétarium

Planetarium
Image Credit: Espace pour la vie

Officially, the Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium, the Montréal Planetarium focuses on studying space, more specifically the Milky Way galaxy.

The Planetarium consists of 2 theaters, “Chaos” and “Milky Way,” to teach visitors about astronomy through a series of shows. Topics include the aurora borealis lights, celestial bodies, and maps of the stars. Notably, these shows are generally rotated 1 to 2 times each year, with up to 10 different shows showing at any given time. So, visitors can visit multiple times and continue to have different experiences.

Most of the shows and lectures at the Planetarium are available for visitors of all ages, but some recommended ages are listed to ensure young kids aren’t scared or overwhelmed. There are also a number of displays that allow visitors to learn about space in general, no matter their ages.

The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Admission is free for children under 5, CA$12 (~$9) for kids 5 to 17, CA$17 (~$13) for students 18+, CA$21 (~$16) for seniors 65+, and CA$23.25 (~$17) for adults. The nearest bus stop is Viau.

  • Address: 4801 Pierre-de Coubertin Ave., Montréal, Québec H1V 3V4, Canada

How To Get Free or Reduced Admission to Montréal Museums

We’ve indicated with each museum whether or not children, students, or seniors receive free or reduced admission. Several other programs offer similar concessions.

Musées Montréal offers 4 museum passes starting at CA$115 (~$84), which can be used to visit any of the city’s participating museum facilities.

  • The Excursion card offers visitors a free visit to any or all participating museums for 3 consecutive days.
  • The Excursion+ card allows 1 adult and 1 child under 17 a free visit to any or all participating museums for 3 consecutive days.
  • The Discovery card allows holders 1 free visit to any or all participating museums for a full year.
  • The Discovery+ card offers holders and a guest 1 free visit to any or all participating museums for a full year.

Montréal museums participating in the program include the Afromuseum, the Age of Union Centre, the Arsenal Contemporary Art Montréal, the Science Centre, and more.

Participation is subject to change; please verify participating museums and entry conditions before your visit.

Final Thoughts

There’s no shortage of exhibits or galleries in this corner of Québec. No matter what interests you most, there’s a Montréal museum worth adding to your travel itinerary. We hope this list has helped inspire you to narrow your options so you can pick the museums that interest you most.

Frequently Asked Questions

How many museums are there in Montréal?

There are around 50 active and open museums in Montréal. However, that number is likely to change as new facilities open or others close down. This count doesn’t necessarily include small exhibitions or galleries found on university campuses or temporarily hosted in spaces.

Are museums free on Sunday in Montréal?

Many of Montréal’s museums offer free admission on the first Sunday of the month. While some of these museums allow free access to all visitors, some limit this perk to Québec province residents. Make sure to check the terms of each museum.

Is Montréal known for its museums?

Montréal has started to earn a reputation as a city for art and culture. Its museums are some of the city’s most popular sites among tourists and locals. The art and history museums are the most beloved.

What is the biggest museum in Montréal?

The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts is the city’s largest museum by space and collection. It’s also the most-visited museum in Canada. Its collection is one of the most renowned in the world, with thousands of pieces from some of history’s greatest artists.

Amar Hussain's image

About Amar Hussain

Amar is an avid traveler and tester of products. He has spent the last 13 years traveling all 7 continents and has put the products to the test on each of them. He has contributed to publications including Forbes, the Huffington Post, and more.

INSIDERS ONLY: UP PULSE

Deluxe Travel Provided by UP Pulse

Get the latest travel tips, crucial news, flight & hotel deal alerts...

Plus — expert strategies to maximize your points & miles by joining our (free) newsletter.

We respect your privacy. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA. Google's privacy policy  and terms of service  apply.

Deluxe Travel Provided by UP Pulse
DMCA.com Protection Status