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The Ultimate Guide to Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve — Best Things To Do, See & Enjoy!

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Amar Hussain
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Amar Hussain

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Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve is America’s largest national park, with many opportunities to discover. From historic ghost towns to hunting and fishing, and from remarkable wildlife to extreme winter activities, this national park has no shortage of incredible sights and activities. Each year, 65,000 tourists explore this national park and experience the raw beauty and culture within its borders. 

How To Get to Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve

Where Is Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve?

Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve is on the south-central edge of Alaska, touching the Canadian border. This remote and rugged Alaskan park stretches over 13 million acres of land, including mountain ranges, lush forests, and sparkling waters. Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve is just a short plane ride from Anchorage or Fairbanks.

Nearest Airports to Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve

There are 2 major airports most visitors use when flying to Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. From these airports, travelers must arrange a flight to an airstrip within the park.

Fairbanks International Airport (FAI)

Fairbanks International Airport is located in Fairbanks, Alaska, just a short plane ride from Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. This airport offers nonstop and connecting flights to and from many different U.S. and international cities. Some of the airlines serviced by Fairbanks International Airport include Alaska Airlines, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines, and several smaller airlines. 

Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC)

Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport is located in Anchorage, Alaska. It is the most popular choice for those flying to Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. 

This airport provides flights to and from many popular cities in the U.S. and other countries. Airlines served by Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport include Aeromexico, Alaska Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Fiji Airways, and Virgin Atlantic. After arriving at this airport, visitors must arrange a short flight to get them closer to the park.

Driving to Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve

Views along the Nabesna Road
Image Credit: NPS

There are 2 roads that lead into St. Elias National Park and Preserve: Nabesna Road and McCarthy Road. Visitors will use the Richardson Highway, also called Highway 4, to access the park. It is important to note that you must fly to an area close to the park and then rent a vehicle for your trip.

Many rental car services prohibit driving on gravel roads, so plan ahead for which roads will accommodate your rental car. 

Taking the Train to Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve

There are no train services to Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve.

Shuttle Services to Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve

Several shuttle and bus services offer transportation to and from the Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve area. Interior Alaska Bus Line and Soaring Eagle Transit offer bus and shuttle services from Anchorage to nearby areas. Utilizing the bus or shuttle service is a fantastic way to let someone else take over the stress of driving. It allows you to enjoy the beautiful sights along the way.

Getting Around Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve

A little over 100 miles of roads wind through Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. Having your own vehicle is a great way to drive to the different highlights of the park. There are shuttle services that take visitors to and from the McCarthy and Kennecott area, should you want someone else to take over the driving for a bit.

Other great ways to explore this park are by booking a flightseeing tour or hiking through the different areas. The National Park Service provides several maps and brochures to help you determine the routes you want to take during your park adventures.

What To See and Do in Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve

As America’s largest national park, there’s no shortage of activities to participate in, sights to see, and historic places to explore. From guided tours with park rangers to fishing, and from hunting in the preserve to hiking, there’s something for everyone to appreciate at Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve.

Boating, Floating, and Rafting

Yakutat Bay
Image Credit: Mike Townsend via NPS

Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve has outstanding opportunities for visitors who like spending time on the water. Rafting, boating, and floating at this park is a thrill a minute.

Due to high silt levels, drastic water level changes, and frigid temperatures, these activities would be considered extreme sports. A dry suit and personal flotation device are essential if you plan to participate in these activities. Some of the most popular destinations for a river trip include the Chitina River, Nabesna River, Nizina River, Copper River, and the Chisana River. 

Guided Tours

The summer months offer many opportunities for visitors to learn about Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve by participating in the ranger-led interpretive programs. These free guided tours offer various activities, from guided walks to evening programs to interpretive talks. Kids can even participate in the Junior Ranger Program to earn badges and certificates.

Ranger-led tours and programs are available at the Wrangell St. Elias Visitor Center in Copper Center, the Slana Ranger Station, and the Kennecott Visitor Center. One of the most popular tours is the guided history tour of the Kennecott Mill, which provides the only views inside of the Kennecott Mill.

Bottom Line:

The guided tours at Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve are one of the best ways to learn about and explore this beautiful region of Alaska.

Hiking

Hiking is a fantastic way to explore Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. The trails reward visitors with mesmerizing views of the landscapes and wildlife of the park, and some take visitors through historic areas.

The park is broken into different areas that each feature unique hiking areas. Some of these areas include the Copper Center Area, McCarthy Road and Kennecott, the Nabesna Road Area, and the Yakutat and Coastal Area. At Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve, you can explore temperate rainforests, alpine meadows, glaciers, and streams.

Hunting and Fishing

Hunting and fishing are exciting activities that many visitors enjoy while visiting Wrangel St. Elias National Park and Preserve. Hunting and trapping are only permitted in the preserve, while fishing is permitted in both the preserve and park. Those who want to participate in these activities need to obtain the proper licenses and permits and read the rules and regulations for hunting, trapping, and fishing in Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. 

Hunting takes place at different times of the year; some of the animals that can be hunted here include mountain goats, Dall sheep, caribou, moose, bison, and brown bears.

Fishing is permitted in both the park and preserve. There are hundreds of miles of streams, major river systems, and several lakes in Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. Some of the fish that can be caught in this glorious region of Alaska include burbot, lake trout, salmon, whitefish, and Arctic grayling. The park is divided into 3 sport fish regions called the Southcentral Region, the Southeast Region, and the Interior Region. 

Spending a day in the great outdoors hunting, trapping, or fishing is a remarkable way to spend a day in Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve.

Kennecott

Kennecott Mines National Historic Landmark
Image Credit: Mike Townsend via NPS

Kennecott is a historic mining village from the early 1900s. Copper mines were discovered in this area, and by 1911, the Kennecott Copper Corporation was established, bringing in great numbers of people to work them. By 1938, the town was cleared, as the corporation diversified into more profitable mines elsewhere in the Americas.

Today, the Kennecott Mines National Historic Landmark is where guided tours take visitors into the old mines and throughout the town, which contains a general store, post office, and recreation hall. This place is especially lively in the summer months, so if this is something you are interested in learning more about, you may want to make sure to plan your trip during the summer.

Visitor Center

There are 6 visitor centers in Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. Each of these visitor centers holds a wealth of information about the cultural and natural history of the park, and they are a great place for visitors to start. 

The main visitor center is the Wrangell St. Elias Visitor Center is in the Copper Center Area. This visitor center is more than just a regular visitor center — it’s a campus with so much to offer. The campus includes a visitor center, exhibit hall, bookstore, theater, picnic areas, an amphitheater, scenic overlooks, hiking trailheads, and the Ahtna Cultural Center

Other locations serving as visitor centers include:

When visiting Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve, be sure to stop by one or all of these visitor centers. You won’t want to miss the opportunities to learn and grab the necessities before heading out to your park adventure. 

Wildlife Viewing

Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve is home to an incredible array of animals. Watching the animals of this beautiful park will simply take your breath away.

The best places to view wildlife are at higher elevations in the mountains, near the lakes and streams, along the Copper River Basin and Yakutat Bay, and on the coast. Some of the animals that are often seen in the park include moose, Dall sheep, grizzly and black bears, caribou, mountain goats, and numerous types of fish and birds.

Marine mammals, including harbor seals, sea lions, porpoises, whales, and sea otters, are the stars of the show and can be spotted in coastal areas.

Hot Tip:

Don’t forget to pack your camera to capture the remarkable sights of the animals who live in Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve.

Winter Activities

Snowmachining near McCarthy
Image Credit: NPS

The fun doesn’t stop for winter in Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. In fact, winter is a popular time to visit for those who live for winter sports.

Cross-country skiing, snowmobiling, and snowshoeing opportunities abound in this national park. Several areas of the park are closed during the winter, but there are trails open near the Copper Center, including the Boreal Forest Trail and the Valdez Trail.

Winter is a magical time at Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. Winter sports enthusiasts not only get to enjoy the thrills of skiing, snowshoeing, and snowmobiling, but those who venture to this Alaskan park in the winter are rewarded with stunning views of the land and mountains covered in a shimmering blanket of snow. 

Best Times To Visit Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve

Any time you are able to visit Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve, you are guaranteed a trip of a lifetime. Let’s explore the best times to visit this park to see if there’s a time or season you’d like to plan your trip around.

Best Time To Visit Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve for Mountaineering

Mountaineering is a popular activity for extreme adventurers to enjoy at Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. The best month for mountaineering is in May. This is when the snow begins to melt as the temperatures begin to rise. The temperatures are also more comfortable at this time of the year ranging from the upper 20s to the upper 50s. 

Best Time To Visit Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve To Avoid the Crowds

It’s never fun to be in crowded situations when traveling. No matter when you visit this Alaskan park, you won’t experience too many crowded situations other than in the towns. Planning a trip in early September is the best way to go if you don’t want to interact with others during your trip. Once school returns to session, the park sees a dip in visitors, helping it to become more enjoyable for travelers seeking peace and quiet. 

Best Time To Visit Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve for Wildlife

Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve Wildlife
Image Credit: NPS

If you are hoping to see the incredible wildlife that makes its home in Wrangell St Elias National Park and Preserve, the best chance is to come in the spring. April is the best month for spring viewing of the wildlife in this national park. The shorebirds and waterfowl return to the area after winter, bears wake up from their slumber, and the fresh green grass draws out lots of animals, such as Dall’s sheep and mountain goats, for feeding.

Bottom Line:

April is an awesome time to visit Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve to get breathtaking views of the animals who call this park home.

Cheapest Time To Visit Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve

Travel is never cheap, but if you plan properly, you can save some money when traveling. The cheapest time to visit Wrangell St. Elias National Park is in September. This is when the park sees a drastic drop in visitors and when flights and accommodations are at their lowest. 

Annual Events in Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve

The summer months at Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve offer lots of programs on a regular schedule. There are also some annual events that take place in this national park that bring in lots of visitors.

The Copper River Delta Shorebird Festival

Bird enthusiasts are in for a treat if they are able to visit in early May for the Copper River Delta Shorebird Festival. This event takes place each year in May as 5 million shorebirds make their way back from migrating during the winter months. This event is well-loved by locals and visitors and features an artisan market, exciting dining opportunities, art workshops, and of course, unmatched opportunities for birdwatching. 

Yakutat Tern Festival

The Yakutat Tern Festival is centered around the Aleutian Tern and its largest known breeding colonies. This festival takes place each June and celebrates these magnificent birds and the rich cultural and artistic heritage of the Yakutat region. This event includes exciting activities for all ages, an art show, photography workshops, seminars, and live performances.

One of the most exciting parts of this event is the kayak and charter boat trips. Attending the Yakutat Tern Festival is a great way to spend time with family, friends, and others who have a love for birding. 

Where To Stay in Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve

Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve is a unique national park in that it holds several towns within its boundaries. This is a win-win situation when it comes to planning where to stay during your trip, as the opportunities seem endless. Whether you want to stay within the park boundaries or in a town close by, you can rest assured that you will find the perfect place for a home away from home during your vacation.

Inside the Park

For visitors who want to stay within the boundaries of the park, you are in luck. From camping in the backcountry to public use cabins, and from luxury lodges to historic hotels, there’s no shortage of places to lay your head during your trip to Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve.

Backcountry Camping

Backcountry camping opportunities abound in Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve, as the majority of the land is open wilderness. Camping in the backcountry is no walk in the park in this Alaskan region; it is considered extreme. Rock falling, mudslides, extreme weather, avalanches, and wildlife can all pose safety hazards.

It is essential to understand the complexities of backcountry camping in Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve and to follow all the safety precautions. If you are up for the challenge, backcountry camping can help you to make one-of-a-kind memories that will last a lifetime. 

Kendesnii Campground

Reflections at Kendesnii Twin lakes
Image Credit: Kaila Pfister via NPS

Kendesnii Campground is the only designated campground in Wrangell St. Elias National Park. This campground is located off Nabesna Road. 

There are 10 campsites at Kendesnii Campground, which are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. There is no fee for camping here. Amenities at this campground include fire rings and picnic tables. There are vault toilets in the area and drinking water nearby at the visitor center and ranger station. 

Staying at Kendesnii Campground is a wonderful mix of primitive camping with some conveniences. This is the ideal location for taking in the beauty of this national park and taking a break from the hustle and bustle of the daily grind. 

Kennecott Glacier Lodge

Kennecott Glacier Lodge is open from late May to early September each year. This family-owned lodge offers superior hospitality, stunning sights of the Alaskan scenery, and an abundance of opportunities for outdoor recreation. This is the only lodge in the historic Kennecott town.

There are 2 buildings at Kennecott Glacier Lodge: the Main Lodge and the South Wing. The main lodge is the original building and has 23 guest rooms, a lobby, and a restaurant. There are also 2 rooms for socializing and relaxing with others and an expansive panoramic front porch for taking in the views. The South Wing has 20 guest rooms, a common room, and a large front porch that showcases a spectacular view. 

All meals are served in the on-site restaurant in the Main Lodge. Breakfast is a buffet, while lunch and dinner are times to order off a menu that offers top-quality steaks, fresh seafood, and homemade desserts. 

This lodge is in the perfect location for visitors who seek adventure. There are glaciers nearby for hiking and ice climbing, the historic mining town that can be explored, and opportunities for guided fun like river rafting, flightseeing, and mountain biking.

Hot Tip:

The friendly staff at Kennecott Glacier Lodge is happy to help you make arrangements to do all the things on your Wrangell St. Elias wish list.

Ma Johnson’s Hotel

Ma Johnsons Hotel
Image Credit: Ma Johnson’s Hotel

Ma Johnson’s Hotel is located in the McCarthy area of Wrangell St. Elias National Park. This hotel is the one and only authentic historic hotel and has been serving guests for decades. When staying at here, guests feel as if they are stepping back in time.

There are 20 rooms at Ma Johnson’s Hotel. It is often referred to as a living museum, as this former boarding house is filled with a vibrant history. The guest rooms are decorated and furnished with a mix of old and new conveniences, such as antique beds, luxury mattresses, traditional quilts, and internet access. 

There are 3 restaurants to choose from when it comes time to eat, ranging from fine dining to bars to classic diner-style. The location is ideal for visitors who seek adventures, with flightseeing, glacier hiking, rafting, and nature walking as some of the most popular activities for those who stay in this area. 

Ma Johnson’s Hotel is a superb choice for visitors who want a mix of history and modern, adventure and relaxation. Staying in this hotel is a great way to enjoy nature and the culture of Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. 

Public Use Cabins

There are 12 public use cabins available at Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. The majority of these cabins were used as mining, hunting, or trapping cabins in the past and have recently been restored by the National Park Service. 

The cabins are scattered throughout different areas of the park. Most of them are only accessible by flying to remote airstrips nearby. If you intend to use the public use cabins, they are available on a first-come-first-served basis, with the exception of 4 cabins that can be reserved. The reservable cabins include Caribou Creek, Nugget Creek, Viking Lodge, and Esker Stream.

The cabins are rustic, and campers should expect a primitive experience with no running water, electricity, or plumbing. The amenities are scarce at these cabins and include wooden bunk beds, a wood-burning stove, a pit-toilet outhouse, and a table and chairs for dining. 

The public-use cabins are an excellent choice for visitors who want to step back in time and experience what life was like without modern-day luxuries. It’s a great way to enjoy the raw beauty of Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve.  

Towns in Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve

Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve is unique in that there are several towns located within the park. These towns make a great option for setting up a home base during your national park vacation.

Kennecott

View of Kennecott
Image Credit: NPS

Kennecott is a historic mining town inside Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. This town has much to see and do, as well as wonderful opportunities for dining and lodging. There are luxury lodges, historic hotels, and rustic cabins scattered throughout Kennecott. No matter what type of lodging you seek, you are sure to find the perfect solution for your lodging needs. 

For dining, visitors can enjoy a lovely meal in the dining rooms at various lodges, and there are also traditional restaurants in the town. Lots of the restaurants serve meals made with freshly caught seafood and wild game, locally-sourced ingredients, and produce. 

Kennecott is an excellent town for history buffs, as there is so much to explore in this area. Some of the favorite places to explore include the mine buildings, the mill building, a train depot, and the cottages where workers lived. Visitors also enjoy hiking and glacier trekking in the Kennecott area.

Kennecott is a lovely blend of history and nature. With so many options for dining, lodging, and recreation, this town makes an excellent choice for a base camp during a visit to Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. 

McCarthy

McCarthy is a small town near the mining town of Kennecott. It gives a small-town feel and makes a wonderful place to call home during a trip to Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. There are several places for lodging, including bed and breakfasts, camping areas, cabins, lodges, and hostels. From camping in the great outdoors to being waited on in a luxury lodge, McCarthy has it all. 

Since McCarthy is so close to Kennecott, most visitors will still want to visit the Kennecott highlights, such as the historic mining town. There are also other activities for recreation, including hiking, rafting, and flightseeing. 

For eating out, there are many options; saloons, smokehouses, burger joints, and bars are all available when hunger strikes.

Bottom Line:

If you are looking for a place to settle during your stay at Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve, you will find everything you need and more in McCarthy.

Where To Eat in Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve

There are several options for dining in and near Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. Whether you desire a quick meal on the go or to sit and dine in a fine dining room, you can find exactly what you are looking for in this Alaskan area. Check out some of the top-rated restaurants in and near Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. 

The Golden Saloon

The Golden Saloon is in the McCarthy area and is loved by visitors and locals alike. Not only does it serve amazing cuisine, but it also has an impressive drink menu and features live music regularly. This seasonal restaurant is open during the busy season, from May to September.

The menu features soups, sandwiches, burgers, tacos, signature cocktails, beer on tap, and desserts. Taco Tuesday is a favorite day to dine as the restaurant serves street-style tacos, fresh salsa, and habanero pineapple margaritas. 

For a meal you won’t forget with a lively atmosphere, you will want to add The Golden Saloon to your itinerary during your trip to Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve.

The Meatza Wagon

The Meatza Wagon is located in the Kennicott area of Wrangell St. Elias National Park. This locally-owned restaurant offers delicious slow-cooked meat specialties with superb customer service.

All the meals are made from scratch, with the chef preparing each dish by cooking it rustically, using old-fashioned techniques. The menu features signature dishes, with something for every diet, including vegetarian and gluten-free diets. Favorite menu items include the meatball sub, the spicy fish tacos, and the vegan burrito bowl. 

Meals at The Meatza Wagon are served outdoors, so diners can enjoy dinner with a breathtaking view of the Kennicott Glacier and Mt. Blackburn. The Meatza Wagon is a must-try restaurant with so many fantastic items to choose from.

Roadside Potatohead

Roadside Potatohead is one of the top-ranked restaurants in the Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve area. There are 2 locations in the park area: one in Valdez and the other in McCarthy. This restaurant is open from May to September and serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner daily. 

The menu at Roadside Potatohead features meals made from scratch with local produce, including the Potatohead burrito, hand-cut curly fries smothered in sausage gravy, wood-fired pizzas, and the Bonanza burger. 

Roadside Potatohead is a great place to unwind from a day of exploring Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. Not only does this restaurant serve wonderful meals and side items, but they also have outstanding espresso drinks, beer, wine, and cider. The evenings also feature live music and concerts, making the atmosphere perfect after a long day of park excursions. 

Salmon and Bear Restaurant

Salmon and Bear Restaurant is located at the McCarthy Lodge Resort and is a well-known foodie destination. Dining at this historic restaurant will reward you with not only a scrumptious meal but a bit of the history of the mining days in Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. 

Fresh salads, pasta dishes, top-quality steaks and pork creations, and fresh seafood are featured on the menu at Salmon and Bear Restaurant. Customers rave about the braised short rib, the halibut chowder, the sockeye salmon, and the Amazake bison ribeye. 

A hearty meal and a smooth drink at Salmon and Bear Restaurant is the perfect way to end a day of adventures at Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve.

Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve Facts 

View of Sanford and the Copper River
Image Credit: J. Connolly via NPS

1. A New National Park

Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve was declared a U.S. national park in December of 1980 as part of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act.

2. A Monumental Park

Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve stretches over 13 million acres of land, making this the largest national park in the National Park Service. This park is so large Yellowstone National Park could fit into it 6 times. 

3. Original Inhabitants

Researchers believe that the land of Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve was originally settled by a group called the Eyak. This group was then replaced by the Ahtna. These groups eventually left due to the area in the Copper Basin being too small and the game not being bountiful enough to support large groups of people.

4. What’s in a Name

The Wrangell and St. Elias Mountain ranges are the namesake for this national park. These mountains form the backbone of the park.

5. Boomtown or Bust?

Gold was discovered in the Wrangell Mountains and brought in prospectors from all around. The Kennecott Mines was established in 1911 and produced over 1 billion pounds of silver ore and copper. The mines were in business for 27 years, and in 1938, they were depleted of the ore. Once the mines were exhausted, the settlers left the town, and it became a ghost town. 

6. Glaciers Galore

Several glaciers are found in Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. The longest valley glacier in North America, Nabesna Glacier, is found in this park. Nabesna Glacier is 53 miles long. The Malaspina Glacier is another record-setting glacier in this park. Malaspina Glacier is larger than the state of Rhode Island and is the largest non-polar Piedmont glacier in North America. 

7. National Historic Landmark

The Kennecott Mines and mining town were declared a National Historic Landmark in 1986. This amazing area is said to be the best remaining example of copper mining in the early 20th century. 

8. World Heritage Site

In 1979, the Wrangell St. Elias area received the honor of being designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. 

9. Tallest Peak

The highest point of elevation in Wrangell St. Elias National Park is Mt. St. Elias, which stands at 18,008 feet in elevation and is the second-highest peak in the U.S. 

10. Volcanoes in the Park

Some of the largest volcanoes in the world can be found in Wrangell St. Elias National Park. The largest active volcano in this park is also one of the largest active volcanoes in the world. Mount Wrangell stands at 14,163 feet in elevation. The last time this volcano erupted was in 1930. 

Final Thoughts

A trip to Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve is a once-in-a-lifetime experience that will create memories to be cherished forever. This national park has so much to see and do; every traveler will find something that speaks to them.

Whether you want to explore old boomtowns and mines, watch wildlife in their natural habitat, or raft down raging rivers, there’s something for guests of all ages to enjoy at this national park. Book your trip to Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve and discover the adventure that awaits you in this Alaskan park.  

Frequently Asked Questions

How much does it cost to enter Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve?

There is no entry fee at Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. There are several fees that visitors will need to be prepared for, such as lodging, dining, and experiences, but to visit the park, there is no fee.

What is the weather like at Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve?

The weather varies throughout the year at Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. Summer months are warm, with temperatures in the upper 60s to low 80s, and winters are frigid, with lows dipping below zero. July is the month with the most rainfall, and November receives the most precipitation in the winter.

How many days should I spend at Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve?

It is recommended to spend 3 to 4 days at Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve. This allows plenty of time to tour the highlights of the park, hike some of the trails, and possibly even camp in the park.

Is there Wi-Fi service at Wrangell St. Elias National Park?

The majority of the park is remote and rugged wilderness, so there is no Wi-Fi service in most areas of the park. Some of the restaurants, visitor centers, and accommodations feature complimentary Wi-Fi should you need to connect for a bit during your stay.

Amar Hussain's image

About Amar Hussain

Amar is an avid traveler and tester of products. He has spent the last 13 years traveling all 7 continents and has put the products to the test on each of them. He has contributed to publications including Forbes, the Huffington Post, and more.

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