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The 15 Best Museums in Savannah, Georgia [2024]

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Savannah, Georgia, has made a name for itself as one of the most artsy and eclectic cities in the South. While this reputation can be applied to the area’s culture in general, it’s particularly evident when it comes to the local museums. Whether you’re interested in trains, history, or art, there’s a museum in Savannah for you.

The Best Museums in Savannah

1. American Prohibition Museum

American Prohibition Museum
Image Credit: American Prohibition Museum

The American Prohibition Museum is the only facility of its kind in the country. Since it opened, it’s been dedicated to showcasing artifacts from 1920 to 1933, when alcohol was illegal in the U.S. From speakeasies to the rise of organized crime, the museum shows just how big of an impact Prohibition had on the nation.

Some of the most popular parts of this unique facility are authentic flapper dresses from the 1920s, posters and documents from the period, and biographical displays dedicated to some of the most influential figures on both sides of the Prohibition argument.

This is a self-guided experience, but if you plan to visit with a group of 10 or more, you can book a guided tour. There’s also no time limit for visits, though most guests spend about 45 minutes exploring the galleries.

There’s also an on-site speakeasy that serves drinks to guests 21 and over. Admission starts at $29.91 for all guests. Admission to the Prohibition Museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The nearest bus stop is Congress and Jefferson.

  • Address: 209 West Saint Julian St., Savannah, GA 31401

2. Andrew Low House Museum

Andrew Low House Museum
Image Credit: Andrew Low House Museum

Andrew Low House Museum isn’t just one of the most historic buildings in Savannah; it’s also important to those around the country who participate in Girl Scouts. It was, in fact, the former residence of the organization’s founder, Juliette Low.

Today, the house shines a light on Savannah society through the ages through the lens of its residents. It displays the stories of not just the Low family but the enslaved men and women who worked here, giving visitors a real look at all elements of Southern history.

As a house museum, all the viewable rooms are adorned with period-accurate furnishings from the 19th and 20th centuries, many of which were acquired by the Lows. Additionally, visitors are welcome to wander through the estate’s gardens, which have remained virtually unchanged since the 1840s. Each year, Andrew Low House also hosts events for the public.

Admission is free for active military personnel and children under 6, $12 for Girl Scouts or groups of 10 or over, $13 for students 6 to 12, $14 for AARP members or seniors 60 or over, and $15 for all other adults. The Andrew Low House is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from 12 to 4 p.m. The nearest bus stop is Abercorn and Macon Southbound.

  • Address: 329 Abercorn St., Savannah, GA 31401

3. Davenport House Museum

Davenport House Museum
Image Credit: Davenport House Museum

Built in 1820, the Davenport House Museum was originally a family estate. It later served as a boarding house before eventually falling into a state of neglect as Savannah’s society began to shift to other parts of the city.

Today, the house has been restored to its original glory and transformed into a museum to preserve the area’s culture and heritage. In fact, when it was designated a local historical site, Davenport House was the first in a long project to preserve Savannah’s most significant sites.

Antiques furnish all the house’s viewable rooms to recreate what a 19th-century home in the South would have looked like. Since this isn’t a self-guided experience, feel free to ask your guide any questions you might have about the home and its former residents. Davenport House can also be rented as an event venue, and it’s particularly popular for weddings.

Admission is free for children under 6, $10 for kids 6 to 17, and $15 for adults. Davenport House Museum is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The nearest bus stop is Lincoln and Congress.

  • Address: 323 East Broughton St., Savannah, GA 31401

4. Georgia State Railroad Museum

Georgia State Railroad Museum
Image Credit: Georgia State Railroad Museum

Georgia’s State Railroad Museum (GSRM) has the most complete complex of pre-Civil War railroad tracks and buildings in the country. As a result, it’s often cited as having one of the best surviving examples of Victorian-era railway structures not just in the U.S. but worldwide.

This museum includes a number of buildings that were vital to the railroad industry, including machine shops, a blacksmith shop, a boiler house, and a print shop. However, the site’s most popular exhibit is its trains. Some of the most beloved items at the facility are its steam and diesel cars, its extensive model railroad, and its antique machinery. 

GSRM uses a mixture of static and interactive displays to engage visitors of all ages. You can also take a guided tour of the complex on a train and walk through actual railcars. Tour schedules change seasonally, though. The museum also occasionally hosts special events.

Admission is free for children under 2, $8 for kids 2 to 12, and $15 for adults. Georgia State Railroad Museum is open daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The nearest bus stop is MLK and Charlton Southbound.

  • Address: 655 Louisville Road, Savannah, GA 31401

5. Graveface Museum

Graveface Museum
Image Credit: Graveface Museum

Graveface Museum is one of Savannah’s most unique museums. Through its exhibits, it delves into the human condition by examining some of humanity’s more peculiar parts, ranging from cult history to crimes and even the country’s history with sideshows.

True crime lovers will be particularly intrigued by Graveface, thanks to its collection of crime-related artifacts. Some of its most noteworthy galleries include the largest single collection of art by infamous serial killer John Wayne Gacy and items from historical cases.

Though some of the topics Graveface covers in its exhibits may be on the darker side, the museum creates a safe place for visitors who are interested in them. That being said, some of the images and items might not be appropriate for particularly young children or sensitive visitors. This is a mostly self-guided museum, but there are knowledgeable members on staff to answer any questions you might have.

General admission is $24.99. Graveface Museum is open Thursday through Monday from 12 to 7 p.m. The nearest bus stop is Lincoln and Congress.

  • Address: 410 East Lower, Factors Walk, Savannah, GA 31401

6. Harper Fowlkes House

Harper Fowlkes House
Image Credit: Harper Fowlkes House

Harper Fowlkes House (HFH) was originally meant to be the home of local businessman Stephen Gardner, who commissioned its construction. However, its first true use was as one of Savannah’s leading entertainment venues in the 19th century.

Over the years, Harper Fowlkes House has served a number of purposes, being used as a residence and a boarding house before being used by the Society of the Cincinnati fraternity, which operated a chapter out of Georgia.

Today, the house has been largely restored to its original state and is furnished with period-accurate antiques, some of which have been on the property for centuries. Because of the delicate nature of the items displayed at the home, HFH can only be visited alongside a tour guide. However, this also gives guests a chance to ask questions about the property. Harper Fowlkes House is also regularly used as a private event venue.

Admission is free for children under 4, $5 for kids 4 to 12, and $12 for adults. Harper Fowlkes House is open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The nearest bus stop is Whitaker and Hull.

  • Address: 230 Barnard St., Savannah, GA 31401

7. Jepson Center & Telfair Children’s Art Museum

Jepson Center Telfair Childrens Art Museum
Image Credit: Adam Kuehl via Telfair Museums

Jepson Center & Telfair Children’s Art Museum is part of the Telfair Museum group. This particular structure is split into 2 main areas. Jepson Center preserves Savannah’s history while also launching the city’s art scene into the future.

There’s notably no permanent collection on the property. Instead, it has used its numerous interactive activities, educational workshops, lectures, and displays to become one of Georgia’s premier art appreciation facilities.

The Children’s Art Museum (CAM) encourages children to develop an interest in the arts through galleries, hands-on exhibits, and creativity opportunities. Using accessible versions of art styles, the CAM wing of the facility has been vital in keeping the arts alive for future generations. To help uplift emerging artists, Jepson Center also hosts exhibitions throughout the year, which invite creators from around the world to submit their work.

Admission is free for members and children under 6, $10 for kids 6 to 12, $20 for students 13 to 25, $27 for active military personnel and seniors 65 and over, and $30 for other adults. Tickets allow admission to all Telfair museums. CAM is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The nearest bus stop is Oglethorpe and Barnard Westbound.

  • Address: 207 West York St., Savannah, GA 31401

8. Massie Heritage Center

Massie Heritage Center
Image Credit: Massie Heritage Center

The Massie School was once part of Georgia’s oldest public school system. It’s actually the only building from this period of the state’s educational history that’s survived to the modern day. Today, it’s the Massie Heritage Center, a museum dedicated to preserving and highlighting how Savannah has developed over time through the lens of the school system.

The center consists of 8 exhibits, which delve into topics such as Georgia’s indigenous Native American cultures and school programs established by and throughout the city. Massie’s mission is to inspire children to continue pursuing their education, so all of the site’s displays and exhibits have been designed with kids in mind.

Some of the most popular spaces in the museum are those that recreate historic Savannah, such as the schoolhouse wing and the exhibits that display scale models of the town. Massie is a popular field trip destination, but individuals can also visit.

Admission is generally free for children under 5, $6 for kids 5 to 17, $8 for seniors 63 and over, and $10 for adults. The Massie Heritage Center is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The nearest bus stop is Abercorn and Wayne Northbound.

  • Address: 207 East Gordon St., Savannah, GA 31401

9. Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum

Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum
Image Credit: Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum

The Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum in Savannah commemorates the Civil Rights Movement while also tracing the histories of the African men and women who have called the city home for generations.

The museum currently houses 4 permanent exhibits, each utilizing records, documents, and artifacts to explore a different topic.

  • “West Broad Street” looks at Savannah’s flourishing African American business district that began after the end of the Civil War and continued into the 1960s.
  • “The Meeting Room” looks at the immediate aftermath of the Civil War, when land and educational opportunities were finally granted to freed men and women.
  • “Peace and Power” looks at the lifework of NAACP icon Earl T. Shinhoster.
  • A tribute hall dedicated to past influential NAACP voices can also be found in the orientation gallery.

Rotating exhibits are typically on display, as well.

Admission is $7 for students, $8 for seniors, and $14 for adults. The Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum is open Thursday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The nearest bus stop is Montgomery and Wayne Northbound.

  • Address: 460 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Savannah, GA 31401

10. Savannah Children’s Museum

Savannah Childrens Museum
Image Credit: Savannah Children’s Museum

The Savannah Children’s Museum is one of the most beloved, family-friendly spaces in the city. Through exhibits and programs, the museum lets kids explore and play while they learn about science, nature, art, and the world around them.

Currently, the museum has 12 permanent exhibits that aim to tackle different aspects of learning and development. Some of the most popular play areas are a maze, a sensory garden, and even a reading nook. Keep in mind that while the museum is family-friendly, many of the displays and activities on the property were designed for kids 10 and under, so older children might be bored.

Though they’re 2 separate facilities, the Savannah Children’s Museum often collaborates with the Georgia State Railroad Museum for events and activities, particularly train rides. Be sure to check the museum’s event calendar to see what camps and activities are scheduled during your visit.

Admission is free for children under 18 months and $10 for everyone else. Savannah Children’s Museum is open Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The nearest bus stop is MLK and Liberty Southbound.

  • Address: 655 Louisville Road, Savannah, GA 31401

11. Savannah History Museum

Savannah History Museum
Image Credit: Savannah History Museum

Considered one of the city’s most important history centers, the Savannah History Museum preserves Georgia’s history with a mix of static artifact displays and immersive learning experiences.

There are 20 exhibits in the museum that are divided into 4 separate main wings. These exhibits cover everything from Savannah’s Native American cultures to colonialism to the Civil War. There are even spaces dedicated to rotating and temporary galleries that take a closer look at specific parts of local history.

Throughout the year, the facility also hosts special events and tours to help curate a more enriching experience. While many of these events are aimed at kids specifically, they’re beloved by people of all ages.

Today, the museum’s collection has over 10,000 items, many of which are preserved in the archives and rotated through the displays. However, this number is likely to grow as more items are donated to the center.

Admission is $7 for kids 4 to 12 and $10 for adults. Savannah History Museum is open daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The nearest bus stop is MLK and Liberty Southbound.

  • Address: 303 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Savannah, GA 31401

12. SCAD Museum of Art

SCAD Museum of Art
Image Credit: SCAD Museum of Art

Founded by the Savannah College of Art and Design, the SCAD Museum of Art educates students and the general public about the art world. Over the 20 years since it opened, SCAD has amassed a permanent collection of over 4,500 works of art in a variety of media.

These pieces are broadly divided into 5 wings, ranging from haute couture to photography of the 19th and 20th centuries. Due to the prestige of some of the items housed on-site, SCAD often loans some of its pieces to other facilities around the country.

In addition to the permanent galleries, SCAD frequently hosts temporary exhibitions, with multiple showcases typically displayed at a time. Some of the artists featured at the museum include Anthony van Dyck, Oscar de la Renta, Andy Warhol, and Salvador Dalí. SCAD’s museum also sponsors cultural events like art clubs, lectures, and film screenings.

Admission is free for children under 14 and members, $5 for SCAD alumni and students, $8 for active military personnel and seniors 60 and over, and $10 for adults. SCAD’s museum is open Wednesday through Saturday and Monday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 12 to 5 p.m. The nearest bus stop is MLK and Turner Southbound.

  • Address: 601 Turner Blvd., Savannah, GA 31401

“An award-winning architectural icon, the museum attracts visitors from around the world to the heart of Savannah’s vibrant downtown historic district and incorporates the oldest surviving pre-Civil War railroad depot into its design. Guests can enjoy exhibitions ranging from painting, sculpture, and photography to digital media, fashion, and jewelry, complementing the artistic disciplines offered at the Savannah College of Art and Design.”

Daniel S. Palmer, chief curator, SCAD Museum of Art

13. Ships of the Sea Maritime Museum

Ships Of The Sea Maritime Museum
Image Credit: Ships of the Sea Maritime Museum

The Ships of the Sea Maritime Museum is dedicated to Savannah’s coastal history. Since it opened in 1966, the museum has collected hundreds of artifacts, including paintings, antiques, maps, and recreation pieces. Together, these items help visitors get a rich understanding of Savannah’s role in maritime trade.

Some beloved pieces housed at the facility are its ship models, which include replicas of Steamship Savannah, The Anne, and The Wanderer.

Even the museum’s location is significant. It’s housed in the William Scarbrough estate, which has been a pillar of Savannah architecture since the early years of the 19th century. The home is known for its sprawling gardens, which have made the museum a popular venue for private events like weddings and galas.

Admission is free for children under 6; $12.50 for military personnel, veterans, seniors 65 and over, and students; and $15 for adults. Ships of the Sea Maritime Museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The nearest bus stop is Court House.

  • Address: 41 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Savannah, GA 31401

14. Sorrel Weed House Museum

Sorrel Weed House Museum
Image Credit: Jeffrey Chandler via Flickr (license)

Built in the 1800s, the Sorrel Weed House Museum is one of the country’s best examples of Greek Revival architecture. It was also one of the first residences to be officially declared a state landmark in Georgia. Over the years, the home has served many purposes, acting as the home of multiple influential figures of local history and even as one of the sets for the film “Forrest Gump.”

In recent years, Sorrel Week House has taken on a dual identity. Many people visit to admire its traditional architecture. By joining a historical tour, visitors can see how a lavish estate was furnished during the 19th century.

Sorrel Weed House’s other identity is characterized by rumors that the property is haunted. You can take ghost tours during the evening throughout the year, and the space has even been featured on ghost-hunting television shows. Adults 18 and up can reserve a spot in one of the on-site paranormal investigations run by the facility.

Admission is free for children under 6. Tickets start at $13 for everyone else. Sorrel Weed House Museum is open Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and from 6 to 10 p.m., Sunday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and from 6 to 9 p.m., and Tuesday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The nearest bus stop is Liberty and Whitaker Eastbound.

  • Address: 6 West Harris St., Savannah, GA 31401

15. Telfair Academy

Telfair Academy
Image Credit: Telfair Academy

Located in a historic 19th-century mansion, the Telfair Academy was one of the first established public art museums in the country and the first art center in the region.

Telfair Academy not only houses a collection of traditional artwork but also displays numerous decorative art items that have been used to furnish the home. Telfair’s collection features artists from around the world, including European masters like Rembrandt, Rubens, and Michelangelo.

This facility also highlights the contributions local creators have made to the art world as well, including Myrtle Jones, who even studied on the premises. Telfair Academy’s structure is also significant, since it’s one of the only buildings still standing designed by William Jay.

In addition to the iconic work housed at the facility, like the “Bird Girl” statue, Telfair Academy showcases temporary exhibitions during the year. Tours and special events are also commonly found on the facility’s event calendar.

Admission is free for members and children under 6, $10 for kids 6 to 12, $20 for students 13 to 25, $27 for active military personnel and seniors 65 and over, and $30 for other adults. Tickets allow admission to all Telfair museums. Telfair Academy is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The nearest bus stop is Oglethorpe and Barnard Westbound.

  • Address: 121 Barnard St., Savannah, GA 31401

How To Get Free or Reduced Admission to Savannah Museums

We’ve indicated with each museum whether or not children, students, or seniors receive free or reduced admission. Several other programs also offer similar concessions.

The Museums for All program offers free or reduced admission to museums through the U.S. for those receiving food assistance (SNAP benefits). Participating attractions in the greater Savannah area include the Georgia State Railroad Museum, the Jepson Center, Old Fort Jackson, the Savannah Children’s Museum, and more.

Bank of America’s Museums on Us program offers cardholders free general admission on the first full weekend of every month to the following Savannah museums: Georgia State Railroad Museum, Harper Fowlkes House, Old Fort Jackson, Pin Point Heritage Museum, Savannah Children’s Museum, Savannah History Museum, and SCAD Museum of Art.

Participation is subject to change, so please verify participating museums and entry conditions before your visit.

Final Thoughts

There’s no shortage of museums worth visiting in Savannah, Georgia. No matter what your interests are, this corner of the South has something worth seeing. Whether you’re planning a solo trip or a family vacation, make sure to spend a little time exploring some of the exhibits the Hostess City of the South has to offer.

Frequently Asked Questions

How many museums are in Savannah?

Currently, there are around 30 museums in Savannah, Georgia. This number is constantly subject to change, however, as new places open and others close or merge together. This number doesn’t always consider all the small exhibitions or galleries that can be found in Savannah.

What’s the best museum in Savannah?

Many people cite the Savannah History Museum as one of the city’s best because it focuses on local history. However, there are dozens of other museums worth visiting in the city that could better suit your interests. Some examples are the Telfair facilities and SCAD.

Is Savannah a good city for tourists?

Savannah is quickly becoming one of the most popular tourist destinations in this part of the country. It’s known for its history and an artsy culture that draws people of all ages and backgrounds. There are dozens of attractions, too, like the city’s many museums.

Does Savannah have museums?

Not only does Savannah have its fair share of museums, but many of the exhibits in the city are considered to be some of the best in the state. These facilities cover a wide variety of topics, from local history to renowned international art.

Amar Hussain's image

About Amar Hussain

Amar is an avid traveler and tester of products. He has spent the last 13 years traveling all 7 continents and has put the products to the test on each of them. He has contributed to publications including Forbes, the Huffington Post, and more.

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