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The Ultimate Guide to Redwood National and State Parks — Best Things To Do, See & Enjoy!

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Amar Hussain
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Amar Hussain

Senior Content Contributor

767 Published Articles

Countries Visited: 63U.S. States Visited: 9

Amar is an avid traveler and tester of products. He has spent the last 13 years traveling all 7 continents and has put the products to the test on each of them. He has contributed to publications incl...
Edited by: Keri Stooksbury
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Keri Stooksbury

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With years of experience in corporate marketing and as the Executive Director of the American Chamber of Commerce in Qatar, Keri is now Editor-in-Chief at UP, overseeing daily content operations and r...

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Redwood National and State Parks are located in the northernmost coastal region of California. This incredible park was established in 1968 and is home to magnificent redwood trees that can live up to 2,000 years and grow to over 300 feet tall.

This area featuring 1 national park and 3 state parks brings in over 1.5 million visitors each year who want to stand in awe of the giant trees and explore the vast forests, wild rivers, and 40 miles of rugged coastline that inhabit the park.

How To Get to Redwood National and State Parks

Where Are Redwood National and State Parks?

Redwood National and State Parks are found on the northernmost coast of California, near the Oregon border. Redwood National and State Parks are found about 7 hours north of San Francisco, 6 hours south of Portland, Oregon, and 4 hours west of Redding. Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park, and Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park join together with Redwood National Park, and the parks are nearly 60 miles long.

Nearest Airports to Redwood National and State Parks

Several airports can be utilized to get to Redwood National and State Parks. While these airports are small, several major airlines operate commercial flights between them and major cities, making it possible to travel and connect from many different locations.

There are 2 airports near Redwood National and State Parks: Arcata-Eureka Airport and Del Norte County Regional Airport. Each airport has rental car desks where guests can easily complete their journey to the park. Let’s look at these 2 airports and discover which would make the most sense for your trip to Redwood National and State Parks.

Arcata-Eureka Airport (ACV)

One popular airport for those traveling to Redwood National and State Parks is Arcata-Eureka Airport, also referred to as California Redwood Coast – Humboldt County Airport. This airport offers several flights and is 32 miles from Redwood National and State Parks. Arcata-Eureka airport is serviced by many popular airlines, including United Airlines, American Airlines, and Avelo.

Del Norte County Regional Airport (CEC)

Del Norte County Regional Airport is another major airport near Redwood National and State Parks. This airport is 53 miles from Redwood National and State Parks. Del Norte County Regional Airport is served by Contour Airlines and American Airlines.

Driving to Redwood National and State Parks

Driving to Redwood National and State Parks
Image Credit: David Mark via Pixabay

For those traveling by personal vehicle, Redwood National and State Parks is typically accessed by U.S. Highway 101 Corridor between Crescent City and Orick.

Depending on where you are coming from, several roads and routes can be taken for traveling to Redwood National and State Parks, and several are scenic drives that provide access to different areas of the park.

Taking the Train to Redwood National and State Parks

Traveling by train provides the ability to see other parts of the country not always accessible by road, and many prefer it to driving. Unfortunately, if you’re hoping to travel to Redwood National and State Parks by train, no direct train service will take you to the park.

The closest Amtrak station is in Klamath Falls, Oregon, 178 miles from Redwood National and State Parks. If traveling by train is what you are longing for, the rest of the journey to Redwood National and State Parks from Klamath Falls can be traveled by bus or rental car.

Public Transportation Available to Redwood National and State Parks

Redwood Coast Transit is a form of public transportation that offers services between and among the communities of Crescent City, Gasquet, Klamath, Smith River, Orick, and Arcata.

This service has benefited those wanting to visit Redwood National and State Parks as it allows guests to sit back and enjoy the trip instead of stressing over directions, road closures, and traffic.

Getting Around Redwood National and State Parks

The only 2 options for getting around Redwood National and State Parks are using your own vehicle or on foot. Since this park is so vast, driving is the most reasonable method for exploring the park. The National Park Service provides printable and interactive maps that can be used for planning your itinerary and navigating while you’re there.

What To See and Do in Redwood National and State Parks

Redwood National and State Parks have a wide variety of things to do and see in the park. From amazing hikes to breathtaking scenic drives, this park has something that entices each of its visitors. Let’s take a look at some of the most popular attractions and activities in Redwood National and State Parks.

Bald Hills Road

Bald Hills Road is a 17-mile road that takes travelers up a steep 15% grade through old-growth and second-growth redwoods and then opens up to prairies dotted with wildflowers, Roosevelt elk, and black bears. This drive has trail access to Lady Bird Johnson and Tall Trees Grove.

Another great stop along the way is the Redwood Creek Overlook which offers spectacular views of Redwood Creek and the Pacific Ocean in the distance.

Hot Tip: Further down this road, travelers can find access to the historic Dolason Prairie and Lyons Ranch.

Boy Scout Tree Trail

Redwoods National Park Hiking
Image Credit: Nik Shuliahin via Unsplash

The Boy Scout Tree Trail is an incredible hike in Redwood National and State Parks. This area is found off of Howland Hill Road, right down from Stout Grove. The hike features groves of ancient redwoods and is a distance of 5.3 miles with a 750-foot elevation gain.

Boy Scout Tree Trail starts in the jungle-like lowlands of the Redwood Forest, crosses trickling streams, and ends at Fern Falls.

Elk Meadow

Wildlife enthusiasts will want to make sure to visit Elk Meadow. Elk Meadow is one of the best places in Redwood National and State Parks to see the incredible Roosevelt elk. This attraction is found outside Orick and at the start of Davison Road. Elk Meadow is a beautiful place to start your park journey in Redwood National and State Parks.

Elk Meadow is also an excellent place for camping and picnicking in one of the designated areas.

Fern Canyon

Fern Canyon
Image Credit: Visit Redwoods

Fern Canyon is a beautiful area of Redwood National and State Parks that features lush greenery, dripping ferns, and a creek flowing through the canyon. This area was made famous by its debut in the “Jurassic Park” movies.

The trail is a little over a mile long and is close to Gold Bluffs Beach, which is a great place to stop and admire the scenery and views, or even camp. On sunny days, countless drops of condensation collect on the canyon walls, which makes the walls shimmer like glitter. These glittering walls are a sight to behold and capture in photographs.

There are times throughout the year when a permit is required to visit this area. Be sure to check when planning your itinerary so you make the most of your time during your trip.

Gold Bluffs Beach

Gold Bluffs Beach is a gorgeous area in Redwoods National Park. This beach is located on the Pacific Ocean and got its name from the famous golden-colored bluffs that overlook it.

There’s a campground on this beach, providing a one-of-a-kind experience for visitors who want to experience camping on the beach next to the crashing waves. When visiting this area, you will likely see the resident herd of elk that visit the beach frequently, or you may catch a glimpse of migrating whales and dolphins.

Howland Hill Road

Howland Hill Road is an exciting scenic drive down a dirt road in Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park. This road is very narrow and 10 miles long. This road will get you up close and personal with the redwood trees.

While this is a spectacular scenic drive through the world’s tallest trees and remarkable ferns, the road is unpaved, so road conditions may vary throughout the year. Be sure to check in with the National Park Service for road conditions before you decide to travel on this scenic road. Please note that this drive is not recommended for RVs and trailers.

Redwood Creek Overlook

Redwood Creek Overlook
Image Credit: Ally Gran via NPS

Redwood Creek Overlook is the place to go if you hope to see incredible sunsets in Redwood National and State Parks. This overlook is situated 1,000 feet above sea level and provides stunning ocean and sunset views. Those who visit this location often see cloud inversions near sunset, which makes for incredible photographs.

Lady Bird Johnson Grove

Lady Bird Johnson Grove is a magnificent grove of old-growth redwoods. This grove is found near the town of Orick in Redwood National and State Parks.

This area is one of the most spectacular groves of redwoods in the world. It is about 1,000 feet above sea level and is considered one of the most popular hikes in the park. The trail is a little over a mile long and has little elevation gain, so visitors of all ages and abilities can easily access it.

Lady Bird Johnson was a former first lady of the U.S., and in August 1969, President Richard Nixon dedicated this area to her. Lady Bird Johnson was an environmental activist who was passionate about preserving lands throughout the West.

Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway

The Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway is a drive you won’t want to miss while visiting Redwood National and State Parks. This drive passes through the center of an old-growth redwood forest in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park.

From north to south, the drive features a variety of trailheads, Big Tree Wayside, Prairie Creek Visitor Center, Elk Prairie Campground, and a resident herd of Roosevelt elk.

Ranger-led Programs

Park rangers and guides lead various programs and activities throughout Redwood National and State Parks. These programs are educational, free of charge, and exciting for all ages.

Some of the programs offered at Redwood National and State Parks include Junior Ranger Programs for children ages 7 to 12, where they learn about the people, plants, animals, and life systems of the redwood region.

Another unique ranger-led program is the guided kayak tours. These tours happen only during the summertime, and Redwood National and State Parks hosts kayak tours of the Smith River, which is considered the crown jewel of the national wild and scenic river system.

The Smith River is the most extensive free-flowing river system in California. Experienced park rangers lead these kayak tours and teach visitors about various topics, including the geology of the Smith River watershed and how it contributes to the growth of the world’s most giant trees.

Tide pool walks are another ranger lead program where visitors follow a park ranger who teaches visitors about the area’s marine life. Other ranger-lead programs include campfire programs and nature walks.

Bottom Line: No matter which ranger-led program you choose to be a part of, you can be assured that you will learn a great deal while exploring a beautiful part of the park.

Stout Memorial Grove

Stout Memorial Grove
Image Credit: John Chao via NPS

Stout Grove is one of the most remarkable and highly photographed groves of ancient redwoods in Redwood National and State Parks. This incredible attraction is located in Jedediah Smith Redwoods, north of Crescent City.

Stout Grove features a small grove of giant redwoods that stand over 300 feet tall. The road that leads to Stout Grove is unpaved, but visitors can traverse it with 2-wheel drive vehicles. Stout Grove is notorious for its magnificent old-growth redwood trees and is one of the top places in the park for capturing photos of these stunning giants.

Tall Trees Grove

Tall Trees Grove is one of the most spectacular groves of trees in Redwood National and State Parks.

The trail in this area is quite a bit longer than other popular park areas and covers about 3.5 miles round-trip. There’s an 800-foot elevation gain which leads to mesmerizing views of the trees and the landscape.

Tall Trees Grove is best known as being the location for Libbey Tree. Libbey Tree once held the title of the world’s tallest living thing. More towering redwoods have been discovered, but it is still a fun stop to make during your Redwood National and State Parks vacation. If you wish to visit this area, you must obtain a free pass 24 to 48 hours in advance.

Visitor Centers

Since this park covers such a vast expanse of land and multiple state parks, there are many visitor centers located in Redwood National and State Parks. These visitor centers are great places to begin your park experience or simply take a break from exploring.

Each visitor center has many exhibits, bookstores, passport stamps, and rangers who are there to help you plan your time at the park. The visitor centers include the Hiouchi Visitor Center, Jedediah Smith Visitor Center, Crescent City Information Center, Prairie Creek Visitor Center, and Thomas H. Kuchel Visitor Center.

Best Times To Visit Redwood National and State Parks

Redwood National Park
Image Credit: Emma Watson via Unsplash

Redwood National and State Parks is a phenomenal location that many people want to experience at least once in their lifetime. The park is open year-round, as most national parks are, but if you want to visit the park for a particular reason or activity, you will want to do your research when planning your trip.

Best Time To Visit Redwood National and State Parks in the Winter

Winter is a wonderful time to visit Redwood National and State Parks. The temperatures are cooler, with lows in the mid-40s. Winter is not a very busy time for the park, which means it’s a fantastic time to experience the beauty of the redwoods. If you don’t mind the rain, December and January offer the lowest prices and the smallest crowds.

Visiting the park from November to March will provide visitors with solitary hiking experiences, scenic and calm drives, and the adventure of experiencing the forest in the rain.

Hot Tip: Don’t be afraid of visiting during the winter, as the rain creates a unique and magical atmosphere in the redwood forests.

Best Time To Visit Redwood National and State Parks to Avoid the Crowds

If you want to experience Redwood National and State Parks without the crowds, planning a trip in the spring and autumn is a great idea. Fewer visitors are in the park in April, May, September, and October, so this is an ideal time to visit if you are hoping for a less crowded park experience.

Best Time To Visit Redwood National and State Parks for Viewing Wildlife

Wildlife in Redwood National and State Parks thrives year-round, but there are some key times during the year when the opportunity to see these remarkable animals is greater than others. If you want to go whale watching, peak migration months for gray whales are November through December and March through April.

The Roosevelt elk is a notorious animal that makes its home in the park. These animals can be spotted in the park throughout the year, but there are some particular times when you are more likely to see them. From summer through winter, you have a good chance of seeing male elk sporting their large antlers near the rivers, in the prairies, or even on the beach. May and June bring newborn calves which are birthed in the open, grassy areas.

Cheapest Time To Visit Redwood National and State Parks

There are several times during the year when prices are lower when it comes to flying and lodging near Redwood National and State Parks. Early January to mid-March, mid-April to late April, and early August to mid-November are cheaper months to visit the park.

The cheapest time to take a vacation to Redwood National and State Parks is typically early to mid-September, when flights and accommodations are the least expensive.

Annual Events in Redwood National and State Parks

Hundreds of festivals, sporting events, and cultural celebrations are hosted in towns near Redwood National and State Parks. Some featured events during the year include the Godwit Days Spring Migration Bird Festival, the Avenue of Giants Marathon, and the Rutabaga Ball.

Avenue of the Giants Marathon

The Avenue of the Giants Marathon happens on the first Sunday of May each year. This course is considered one of the most scenic races in the U.S.

The race route runs through ancient redwoods and follows a natural creek through the middle of the park. This race was created by the Six Rivers Running Club and first began in 1972. It is one of the largest marathons on the West Coast. The Avenue of the Giants Marathon is certified as a Boston Marathon qualifying event.

Godwit Days Festival

The Godwit Days Festival is an annual, weeklong festival in Arcata set in the middle of April. This festival allows bird enthusiasts to observe many of the area’s bird species and other wildlife.

Godwit Days Festival features field trips, lectures, and workshops that are led by local guides. Visitors can tour the mud flats, river valleys, and rocky ocean coasts in Klamath. The festival also hosts contests for art and writing.

Rutabaga Ball

The Rutabaga Ball happens in May each year on the third Saturday of the month. This event is held in Arcata. The Rutabaga Ball is known for the Rutabaga Queen contest and is a fundraiser for the Kinetic Grand Championship.

This event was established in 1973 after an eccentric woman named Barbara Ludwig decided that the Kinetic Race (a 40-mile race featuring artists and whimsical transportation methods) needed a reigning monarch and declared herself the Rutabaga Queen. Since then, a new queen has been crowned at the Rutabaga Ball each year.

Where To Stay in Redwood National and State Parks

Redwood National and State Parks has limited lodging and accommodations, but there are excellent options for staying inside or near the park.

Inside the Park

Camping in Redwood National and State Parks
Image Credit: Everett Mcintire via Unsplash

If you want to lodge in Redwood National and State Parks, your only option will be camping. This national park has 4 developed campgrounds, 2 of which include cabins. The 4 developed campgrounds include Jedediah Smith, Mill Creek, Elk Prairie, and Gold Bluffs Beach. Cabins are available at Jedediah Smith and Elk Prairie campgrounds only.

It’s wise to book your camping trip in advance, as the campgrounds fill up quickly. RV or tent camping is permitted on the developed campgrounds. There are also backcountry campsites throughout the park if a more rustic experience is what you’re seeking.

Towns Near Redwood National and State Parks

There are several gateway towns and cities near Redwood National and State Parks. Each of these towns has its own unique ambiance, as well as several dining and lodging options.

Crescent City

Crescent City is located about an hour from Redwood National and State Parks at its northern edge. Crescent City is one of the last towns you can visit before reaching the Oregon border. Crescent City has a variety of budget-friendly accommodations near Redwood National and State Parks.

Popular places to stay in Crescent City include affordable facilities such as Lighthouse Inn and Oceanview Inn. Lighthouse Inn is a motel-style facility that is near the harbor. Oceanview Inn is a hotel located right in the heart of the town.

Eureka

Eureka is the largest town near Redwood National and State Parks and is approximately 45 minutes from the center of the park. It’s a large coastal town between San Francisco and Portland. This charming town has many historic buildings that can be explored. The entire city is a state historic landmark.

Historically, Eureka was a major logging town, and recently it has turned into an artsy city with lots to do. The town is well-known for its unique Victorian buildings, artistic culture, one-of-a-kind shops, unique restaurants, and artisanal businesses.

Carter House Inns and Eureka Inn are considered the best places to stay in Eureka. Carter House Inns is perfect for a luxury stay in the historic part of the town. Eureka Inn is a charming property with luxury amenities.

Klamath

Klamath is the closest town to Redwood National and State Parks. There are fewer options for lodging in this town, but there are several great choices, such as the Holiday Inn Express and the Historic Requa Inn. The Holiday Inn Express offers a budget-friendly stay near the park, while the Historic Requa Inn is a charming bed-and-breakfast style inn.

Trinidad

Trinidad is a seaside town near Redwood National and State Parks. This beautiful town is known for its coastline with 10 public beaches and offshore rocks. Trinidad is an ideal option for setting up a base camp when visiting Redwood National and State Parks, as it has several options for dining, shopping, and lodging.

Lost Whale Inn and View Crest Lodge are 2 of the best places to stay in this area. The Lost Whale Inn is a bed-and-breakfast that is rated highly for good value for lodging in Trinidad. The View Crest Lodge is a charming hotel that is a wonderful place to relax and unwind after a day of exploring.

Where To Eat in Redwood National and State Parks

Besides several picnic areas, there are no food vendors or restaurants in Redwood National and State Parks. It’s essential to plan so that you aren’t exploring the park on an empty stomach.

The nearby towns have plenty of dining and grocery options available for those who want to dine in fine restaurants or grab all the fixings for a picnic in the park. Let’s take a look at some of the popular dining facilities near Redwood National and State Parks.

The Larrupin Café

The Larrupin Café is located 16 miles from the park but is well worth the trip if you find yourself craving a juicy steak or delicious seafood.

This restaurant is highly-rated in the Trinidad area and features a menu of quality meats, local seafood, and vegetarian and vegan options. The restaurant features live music on certain nights, and visitors say it serves the best food around.

Log Cabin Diner

Log Cabin Diner is a top-rated restaurant in Klamath that serves breakfast and lunch daily. This home-cooking restaurant has incredible, friendly service that goes above and beyond to make its customers feel welcomed and well-fed.

Some of their most popular dishes include their signature breakfast burrito, French toast, eggs Benedict, and their famous Klamath Burger. This restaurant is not very close to Redwood National and State Parks, about 60 miles from it, but customers rave about the service and food and the variety of attractions and sites to explore near the diner.

Shoreline Deli and Market

Shoreline Deli and Market is a great place to stop for food, gas, or any other travel necessities. This charming deli is located in Orick, just 3 miles from the Redwood National and State Parks. Shoreline Deli and Market serves tasty handmade sandwiches and picnic foods like meats and cheeses.

Snack Shack

Snack Shack is located in Orick and is a favorite restaurant of those visiting Redwood National and State Parks. This restaurant is just 2.5 miles from the park and features a menu with burgers made from Eureka natural foods, local, high-quality natural beef, and other quick bites.

The elk burger is a fan favorite. The menu also includes vegetarian-friendly dishes. This restaurant is highly recommended by travelers who need to refuel during their park excursions.

Trinidad Bay Eatery

Trinidad Bay Eatery is a local favorite that has been serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner in Trinidad since 1975. This cozy café is known for its hometown hospitality, where visitors feel right at home. Trinidad Bay Eatery serves the highest quality meats, locally caught seafood, and fresh, organic, and natural ingredients in all of its dishes.

Bottom Line: From morning coffee to a late-night filet mignon, you can rest assured that you will eat well and be completely satisfied when dining at Trinidad Bay Eatery.

Redwood National and State Parks Facts

Redwood giants in Northern California
Image Credit: Dan Meyers via Unsplash

1. Redwood National and State Parks: 4 Parks Combined

Redwood National and State Parks is actually a partnership of 4 different parks that have been combined into one. These parks include Redwood National Park, Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park, and Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park. These parks contain 45% of the remaining old-growth coast redwoods.

2. Nearly as Old as Dinosaurs

The first redwood trees date back in history before humans, spiders, and flowers were found on earth. It is believed that the first redwoods appeared over 240 million years ago, during the time of dinosaurs walking the world.

Humans have been around for 200,000 years, so it is baffling to think of these ancient trees dating back that far. The oldest living redwood is thought to be nearly 2,500 years old. This ancient tree would’ve been just a seedling during the time of the Roman empire.

3. Tallest Tree on Earth

The tallest tree in the world is named Hyperion and is found in Redwood National and State Parks. This tree stands at 380 feet tall. Unfortunately, visitors are not allowed to visit this massive tree, and its precise location is kept closely guarded and protected. This tree was discovered by Americans Chris Atkins and Michael Taylor on August 25, 2006.

4. An Abundance of Wildlife

There is a vast array of wildlife present in Redwood National and State Parks. From bird species to tide pool creatures, land mammals to marine mammals, and endangered species to the fish swimming in the streams, visitors to Redwood National and State Parks have an excellent chance of seeing wildlife that makes their home in the park.

Some of the most incredible animals include the California sea lions, the giant green sea anemone, bald eagles, Roosevelt elk, and banana slugs.

Some endangered and threatened animals found in Redwood National and State Parks include the coho salmon, Chinook salmon, fisher, and Humboldt marten. Visitors will likely see these threatened and endangered animals while exploring the park.

5. Orchards Galore

There are at least 9 orchards in Redwood National and State Parks. The 2 most extensive orchards are Lyons Ranches Homeplace Orchard, located in the Bald Hills, and the Boyes Prairie Orchard, found in the Elk Meadow area of Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park.

These historic orchards have been thriving since the late 1800s, and the trees found there include walnut, apple, pear, cherry, and plum.

6. Massive Trees, Tiny Fruit

The pinecones that fall from the redwoods are only an inch in length, which is surprising because of the enormous size of the parent plant. These cones produce thousands of seeds, but the germination rate is fairly low, so new growth doesn’t happen as often as you’d think.

7. Protective Bark

The giant redwoods have bark that can be up to 1 foot thick. This thick bark makes the tree pest-, fungal-, and fire-resistant. This natural protective bark helps prevent the spread of forest fires in the redwood region.

8. A Colossal Animal

The largest mammal living in Redwood National and State Parks is the Roosevelt elk. This massive animal can measure up to 10 feet long and weigh up to 1,100 pounds.

Roosevelt elk can be found in the Crescent Beach area, Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, Elk Meadow, Gold Bluff Beach, Lower Redwood Creek, Park Lanes in the Orick Valley, and the Bald Hills.

Some of these herds number up to 250 elk, while others range in size from approximately 10 to 50 animals. Seeing these animals in their habitat could make for a very memorable experience.

9. Ecosystems on the Trees

Redwoods are so immense that they have their own ecosystems that live on their large branches. Foliage that falls from the trees settles on the branches and decomposes into soil that becomes home to worms, amphibians, spiders, crickets, and beetles.

10. Indigenous People

The native people of the north coast region have made the redwood forests and ecosystems their home for thousands of years. These native people spoke many different languages, and today they continue to live on and off reservations in the Redwood National and State Parks area.

11. A New Park Established

Redwood National and State Parks were established as a United States National Park on October 2, 1968. President Lyndon B. Johnson signed an act into law that established this area as a national park after quite a bit of controversy with local timber companies.

12. A Drastic Reduction of Redwoods

Of the original redwoods, only 5 percent of these magnificent trees remain today. For reference, this is fewer than 120,000 total acres. Several organizations are working to preserve, protect, and restore the remaining redwoods in this area.

Final Thoughts

Redwood National and State Parks brings over 1.5 million adventurers to California each year. A trip to Redwood National and State Parks would be an unforgettable experience for any traveler. Standing in awe of the giant redwoods, experiencing the beauty found in the park’s forests, prairies, and meadows, and learning about the area’s history is something most travelers would cherish forever.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the entrance fees for Redwood National and State Parks?

There are no fees for entering Redwood National and State Parks. Most of the state parks that are combined with this park are also free. There is an entrance fee when driving to Gold Bluffs Beach and Fern Canyon, so it’s important to keep that in mind when planning your itinerary. For those planning to camp in the park, you can expect nightly fees for camping.

Are there any trees I can drive through in Redwood National and State Parks?

Many people see pictures or commercials of people driving cars through cut-out tree trunks, but this is not available at Redwood National and State Parks. If this is something you would like to experience during your park visit, there are 3 coast redwoods you may drive through in California, and one of those is just a few minutes from the park in Klamath. The other drive-through trees are 2 hours south of the park. All 3 of these drive-through tree parks are private businesses and charge a fee for driving your car through.

Where are the entrance stations located in Redwood National and State Parks?

Redwood National and State Parks has no entrance stations or main gates that mark the beginning of the park. Most sites, facilities, and trails are found along Highway 101, the Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway, or other county roads. The only entrance station within Redwood National and State Parks is located in Fern Canyon. Visitors will have to stop at this station to pay an entrance fee for entering Gold Bluffs Beach.

Can I bring my dog with me to Redwood National and State Parks?

Pets are not allowed on park trails or ranger lead programs. If you choose to bring your dog to Redwood National and State Parks, there are several guidelines to follow to keep your pet safe. The park expectations are that pets must be on a leash no longer than 6 feet in length, stay in the designated areas, be mindful of the natural wildlife that resides in the park, and that the owner cleans up after all pet waste. Pets are allowed in parking areas, scenic viewpoints like the Klamath River Overlook and the Redwood Creek Overlook, developed campgrounds, beaches, and gravel roads.

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About Amar Hussain

Amar is an avid traveler and tester of products. He has spent the last 13 years traveling all 7 continents and has put the products to the test on each of them. He has contributed to publications including Forbes, the Huffington Post, and more.

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