Airplane Classes – Why They Exist and How They Affect Revenue

Airplane cabin

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Upgraded Points created this infographic to discuss the financials and motives behind the different types of airplane classes — why they exist and how they affect revenue.

You’ll also discover why there’s a movement from airlines to phase out First Class, and replace with additional Business (or Premium) class seats.

Please let us know what you think in the comments section below! 

Airplane Classes Infographic - Upgraded Points

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Frequently asked questions

What airlines class are the most profitable?

In terms of revenue per square foot, generally speaking, Business class is the most profitable. Followed by Premium economy, First class, and then economy.

This is likely why we continue to see a greater shift from airlines away from first class, and more towards expanded business class sections.

 

Alex Miller

About Alex Miller

Alex has been traveling for over 25 years and from a young age was lucky enough to set out on numerous family trips all over the world, which gave him the travel bug. Alex has since earned millions of travel points and miles, mainly through maximizing credit card sign-up bonuses and taking every opportunity to earn the most points possible on each dollar spent.

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