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The Ultimate Guide to Great Basin National Park — Best Things To Do, See & Enjoy!

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Amar Hussain
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Amar Hussain

Senior Content Contributor

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Amar is an avid traveler and tester of products. He has spent the last 13 years traveling all 7 continents and has put the products to the test on each of them. He has contributed to publications incl...
Edited by: Keri Stooksbury
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Keri Stooksbury

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Great Basin National Park highlights the Great Basin, which stretches over two-thirds of the state of Nevada and stretches into Utah, California, Idaho, and Oregon. This park in east-central Nevada protects over 77,000 acres of diverse ecosystems. Each year approximately 90,000 visitors come to Great Basin National Park to discover the beauty and wonder of this incredible U.S. national park.

How To Get to Great Basin National Park

Where Is Great Basin National Park?

Great Basin National Park is located in east-central Nevada near the border of Utah. This remote national park is 5 miles from the small town of Baker. Major cities near Great Basin National Park include Salt Lake City, 234 miles east of the park, and Las Vegas, 286 miles south of the park. This beautiful park stretches over 77,100 acres of mountain, desert, and cave systems.

Nearest Airports to Great Basin National Park

There are several options for airports for visitors who fly to Great Basin National Park. There are 2 regional airports and 2 international airports that are most commonly used when traveling to this park. No matter which airport you select, there will be at least a couple of hours of driving to the park.

Cedar City Regional Airport (CDC)

Cedar City Regional Airport is 142 miles from Great Basin National Park in Cedar City, Utah. This airline offers commercial air service with Delta Connection. Cedar City Regional Airport is the closest commercial airport to the park.

Avis and Enterprise are the rental car agencies that can help you arrange a car for driving the rest of the way for your Great Basin National Park vacation.

Bottom Line: While Cedar City Regional Airport is smaller and has only 1 airline, taking a flight to and from this airport can shave a lot of travel time off of your trip.

Harry Reid International Airport (LAS)

Harry Reid International Airport is located in Las Vegas, Nevada. This airport is approximately 286 miles from Great Basin National Park.

This airport offers nonstop flights to dozens of cities, both domestically and internationally, and services many major airlines, including American, Delta, Frontier, Southwest, and Spirit.

There are rental car kiosks available to help visitors rent a car to continue their journey to Great Basin National Park. Harry Reid International Airport is an excellent option for those flying into Nevada. The journey to the park is filled with incredible landscapes and attractions.

Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC)

Salt Lake City International Airport in Utah is the closest full-service airport to Great Basin National Park. This airport is 234 miles from the park.

This airport offers over 300 nonstop daily flights to over 90 destinations and services several well-known airlines, including Aeromexico, American, Delta, JetBlue, and Southwest. 

Renting a car is a breeze at Salt Lake City International Airport, as there are rental kiosks for selecting a vehicle to finish the last leg of your journey to Great Basin National Park.

St. George Regional Airport (SGU)

St. George Regional Airport is located in St. George, Utah, approximately 207 miles from Great Basin National Park.

This airport services American, Delta, and United and offers flights to Denver, Phoenix, and Salt Lake City. While this is a smaller airport, it makes an excellent option for connecting to a larger airport, which could save lots of time when traveling.

Driving to Great Basin National Park

When traveling to Great Basin National Park, it is best to have the routes and directions mapped out before you begin your journey. It is not recommended to use navigation apps when traveling to this park. Below are the routes for coming to the park.

From the East or West

Turn south on Nevada State Highway 487 from US Highway 6 or 50 and drive to Baker, Nevada. Once in Baker, access Highway 488. From this point, it is only a 5-mile drive to the park entrance.

From the South

Take Utah State Highway 21 north through Milford and Garrison. Once you cross the state border, this highway will become Nevada State Highway 487. Take Highway 488 in Baker and drive 5 miles until you arrive at the park.

From the North

If arriving from the North, take US Highway 93 North. Take Highway 487 South at the junction of Highway 5 and 6. Travel 5 miles to Baker, then take a turn onto Highway 488 West. It is just an additional 5 miles until you arrive at the park entrance.

Getting Around Great Basin National Park

The best way to get around Great Basin National Park is by private vehicle. There is a lovely scenic drive, fantastic visitor centers, overlooks, and trailheads that can be driven to. The park service offers several interactive and printable maps that are great tools when mapping out your itinerary.

What To See and Do in Great Basin National Park

Great Basin National Park has many attractions, activities, and adventures just waiting for you to discover. There’s something for everyone, from fishing and hiking to astronomy and cave tours. Let’s explore the top things to see and do at Great Basin National Park.

Fishing

Fishing Great Basin National Park
Image Credit: Kelly Carroll via NPS

Great Basin National Park is a paradise for anglers. This park has a multitude of opportunities for fishing. Some popular fishing areas in Great Basin National Park include Lehman Creek, Baker Creek, and Snake Creek.

The fish most commonly caught in Great Basin National Park are the native Bonneville cutthroat trout, rainbow trout, brook trout, and brown trout. If you plan to fish while visiting this park, be sure to note that a fishing license is required.

Hiking

Hiking is one of the best ways to explore and discover the beauty of Great Basin National Park. The park has dozens of trails for every ability level.

The trails lead hikers through various landscapes, around glacial lakes, through historic mining channels, and through alpine forests. Some of the most popular trails include Mountain View Nature Trail, Sky Island Forest Trail, Osceola Ditch Interpretive Trail, Bristlecone and Glacier Trail, and the Alpine Lakes Loop Trail.

Lehman Caves Tour

Touring Lehman Caves is one of the most popular activities at Great Basin National Park. Only a ranger-led tour can enter the caves. Participating in a cave tour is an informative experience as visitors learn about the history and geology of the caves.

Several tours are offered at different times during the year, including the Parachute Shield Tour, Lodge Room Tour, Gothic Palace Tour, and Grand Palace Tour. The tours range from 30 to 90 minutes, and there are fees for each participant.

Pine Nut Gathering

Pine nut gathering is a unique activity at Great Basin National Park. Pinyon pines are found in several areas of the park.

Pine nuts from pinyon trees are tasty and nutritious. Native Americans and animals gathered these nuts for thousands of years. These pine nuts are typically purchased in gourmet grocery stores. Gathering pine nuts at Great Basin National Park gives clues to how the first inhabitants lived thousands of years ago.

Hot Tip: It is important to note that if you plan to participate in pine nut gathering, there is a list of gathering regulations to keep in mind. There are limits to how many pounds can be collected and proper ways to pick these delicious delicacies.

Stargazing

Stargazing Great Basin National Park
Image Credit: Kelly Carroll via NPS

Great Basin National Park is an International Dark-Sky Park, which means stargazing is phenomenal. The skies and stars can be appreciated in any park area, but many special places provide unique views of the night skies.

Some popular places to stargaze include the Bristlecone Pine Groves in the mountains, the Baker Archaeological Site, Mather Overlook, and the Astronomy Amphitheater. The park also hosts several stargazing and astronomy events held throughout the year so visitors can learn more about the fantastic sky at Great Basin National Park.

Visitor Centers

The visitor centers at Great Basin National Park are excellent places to stop during your visit. Tourists can learn about the natural and cultural history of the park at these centers. Great Basin National Park has 2 visitor centers: the Lehman Caves Visitor Center and the Great Basin Visitor Center.

Lehman Caves Visitor Center

The Lehman Caves Visitor Center is where the cave tours depart from. The center has staff available to answer any questions about the park, an informative movie, an exhibit hall teaching about the Lehman Caves and the dark sky of the park, and the Great Basin Café. A highlight of this visitor center is the model cave, where you can discover the different kinds of cave formations and find hidden secrets from under rocks on display.

Great Basin Visitor Center

The Great Basin Visitor Center also has staff readily available to answer any questions you may have at the park, an exhibit hall showcasing the landscapes and life zones of the park, a park movie, and a park store.

The visitor centers are excellent places for learning about the park, shopping for souvenirs, and interacting with the park’s staff and volunteers. You will definitely want to stop at these visitor centers during your Great Basin National Park vacation.

Wheeler Peak Scenic Drive

A highlight of Great Basin National Park is Wheeler Peak Scenic Drive. This mountain road travels along the mountains of the South Snake Range and winds its way up to an incredible view of the Great Basin Desert.

Wheeler Peak Scenic Drive is a 12-mile road that crosses through several ecosystems. This scenic drive shows lots of wildlife, including marmots, coyotes, jackrabbits, and mule deer.

Wildflower Viewing

Most people don’t think of wildflower viewing when they think of Great Basin National Park. Still, this national park has incredible opportunities to view vibrant blooms of wildflowers.

Since there are so many diverse habitats in Great Basin National Park, there are hundreds of species of wildflowers that can be appreciated. The best times to see these gorgeous colors are at low elevations in the early seasons and later at higher elevations.

The best areas to see the wildflowers in bloom include Wheeler Peak Scenic Drive, Island Forest Trail, and Baker Creek Trail. Desert mallow, evening primrose, prickly poppies, mountain bluebells, and Jeffrey’s shooting stars are the most commonly seen wildflowers.

Spotting these bold bursts of colors in the fields of Great Basin National Park adds an extra special touch to your national park vacation.

Wildlife Viewing

Because of the diverse ecosystems present in Great Basin National Park, there are abundant opportunities for wildlife viewing while visiting. Some of the most popular animals in this park include jackrabbits, bighorn sheep, mule deer, beavers, and marmots. Many birds also visit the park, which is great for birdwatchers.

Some of the most-sighted bird species include the common raven, the American robin, the northern flicker, and Clark’s nutcrackers. There are several incredible areas for birdwatching, including the Sagebrush Grasslands, the Pinyon-Juniper Woods, the Ponderosa Pines, and the Alpine Aspen areas. If you love wildlife, you will love the opportunities to see the many animals that make their home in Great Basin National Park.

Winter Touring

Winter Touring Great Basin
Image Credit: B. Mills via NPS

Winter in Great Basin National Park is an exciting adventure just waiting for you. There are many activities for snowy fun during the winter months.

Some popular winter sports include skiing and snowshoeing. There are courses for beginner skiers and tours for experienced ski mountaineers. Popular areas for skiing and snowshoeing include the Lehman Creek Trail and Wheeler Peak. The Wheeler Peak Scenic Drive and Baker Creek Road are also open for skiing and snowshoeing, as they are closed to vehicles during this time of the year.

Another popular winter activity at Great Basin National Park is camping. Winter camping opportunities are available at Lower Lehman Creek Campground or in the backcountry.

Not only are there a lot of winter activities available during the cold months at Great Basin National Park, but this is also one of the least busy times of the year, making it an excellent time for a solitary, quiet visit. Exploring Great Basin National Park under a blanket of glistening snow is a truly enchanting experience.

Best Times To Visit Great Basin National Park

Great Basin National Park is an incredible opportunity, no matter what time of year you visit. However, if you hope to see something specific or participate in a particular event, there may be a better time than others to plan a visit.

Best Time To Visit Great Basin National Park in Winter

Winter is an exciting time at Great Basin National Park. The park has the least visitation in the winter, making it an excellent time for a less crowded experience. The best winter month to visit Great Basin National Park is February. February is the month with the most snow, perfect for those who want to participate in winter sports like snowshoeing and skiing.

Best Time To Visit Great Basin National Park To Avoid the Crowds

If you hope to experience a crowd-free visit to Great Basin National Park, the winter is the best time to visit. The lowest visitation occurs in the first months of the year. Visiting in February provides a solitary experience mixed with the magic of winter.

Bottom Line: With few crowds and warmer temperatures, February would be a great month to visit Great Basin National Park.

Best Time To Visit Great Basin National Park for Stargazing

Great Basin National Park Stargazing
Image Credit: Tom Auchter via NPS

Summer months bring incredible opportunities for stargazing at Great Basin National Park. June is an excellent month to visit for visitors who want to see the fantastic night skies of the park. During this month, guests will likely get to view planets like Venus, Saturn, Jupiter, and the Milky Way galaxy.

Cheapest Time To Visit Great Basin National Park

Saving money is always a bonus when traveling. Planning a September trip after Labor Day is a great way to enjoy travel while spending less. September can also bring cheaper flights and accommodation rates. The park has fewer visitors after Labor Day, and the weather is sensational, making September a great time to visit.

Annual Events in Great Basin National Park

Planning a trip to experience one of the incredible events hosted by Great Basin National Park or the towns nearby would make your vacation even more memorable. Check out some of the popular events in and near Great Basin National Park.

Great Basin Astronomy Festival

The Great Basin Astronomy Festival takes place in Great Basin National Park each September. This free event showcases the spectacular night skies of the park. Some of the highlights of this event include talks by astro-experts, workshops on celestial photography, and stargazing with high-quality telescopes.

Great Basin BioBlitz

The Great Basin BioBlitz is an annual 3-day event in June. During the event, participants learn how the plants, animals, weather conditions, and diseases may affect this park area. Each year, there is a focus on specific taxa, such as forest health.

This event has workshops, astronomy programs, kids’ programs, and guided walks. It is an excellent way to learn more about the park’s ecosystems and how we can do our part to protect and preserve them.

Race the Rails

Race the Rails is an event that takes place in Ely, Nevada, each September. Cyclists race a 19th-century steam train through an old copper mining territory. With a 10-mile or 25-mile course to choose from, cyclists can traverse the rugged desert terrain near Great Basin National Park.

For visitors who don’t want to cycle, the train welcomes passengers to board the train to view the race from a comfortable seat. Whether you participate by cycling or riding this historic train, this event is an exciting, excellent way to tour this incredible area of the West.

Where To Stay in Great Basin National Park

Lodging is one of the top decisions when planning any vacation. Fortunately, there is an abundance of accommodations in and near Great Basin National Park. Whether choosing a traditional hotel or an excellent campground, you can find precisely what you desire in or near this national park.

Inside the Park

Camping is the only lodging option available in Great Basin National Park. Visitors can choose from a variety of stunning locations as well as from developed or primitive campgrounds.

Baker Creek Campground

Baker Creek Campground
Image Credit: NPS

Baker Creek Campground comprises 37 campsites for tent camping or RV camping. This campground operates on a first-come, first-serve basis. Baker Creek Campground is a developed campground that does not have hookups for RVs. Water is available during the spring and fall seasons.

Grey Cliffs Campground

The Grey Cliffs Campground is excellent for campers who enjoy roughing it in the great outdoors. These campsites are ideal for visitors who want a solitary retreat in the desert. Grey Cliffs Campground has 16 sites for tent camping, 4 of which can accommodate larger groups. This campground is incredible for enjoying the dark night skies and the nearby Lehman Caves.

Lower Lehman Creek Campground

Lower Lehman Creek Campground is surrounded by lush vegetation along Lehman Creek. This campground is open to campers in tents or RVs and has 11 total sites.

Campers enjoy the sounds of the rushing mountain water, the gorgeous water birch, white fir, and aspen trees, and the island ecosystem, which is an excellent place for exploring, swimming, and birdwatching. This campground is also within proximity of Lehman Caves.

Snake Creek Campgrounds

Snake Creek Campgrounds is a collection of sites located along the Snake Creek River on the southeastern side of the park. Visitors can choose from several sites that are snuggly situated in the aspen groves at the base of incredible limestone cliffs.

Snake Creek Campgrounds are designated as primitive and are exclusively available to tent campers. These sites include Monkey Rock, Pinnacles, Eagle Peak, and Squirrel Springs.

Upper Lehman Creek Campground

Upper Lehman Creek Campground
Image Credit: NPS

Upper Lehman Creek Campground is an incredible option for camping while staying at Great Basin National Park. This campground is 7,500 feet in elevation and nestled into the forested mountains. Upper Lehman Creek Campground has sites for tent camping as well as RVs. 

While staying at Upper Lehman Campground, your senses will be treated to beautiful sights, sounds, and smells, such as the summer mahogany and the ponderosa pine, as well as the babbling creek and the wind blowing through the fir trees.

Wheeler Peak Campground

Wheeler Peak Campground is an excellent choice for camping at high elevations. This campground is located at 9,500 feet in elevation on Wheeler Peak. Campsites are situated in the aspen groves under the shadow of Wheeler Peak.

Camping in RVs or tents is permitted at this campground. There are 37 different campsites are available at Wheeler Peak Campground. Due to its location, it’s essential to be prepared for varying temperatures, even during summer. Since this campground is in the mountain’s shadow, the temperatures can be cool or cold year-round.

Towns Near Great Basin National Park

For visitors who prefer a more traditional lodging option, there are several options for accommodations in nearby towns. Whether you are looking for a private rental, hotel, or resort, you can find just what you’re looking for in these nearby towns.

Baker, Nevada

Baker is a small town just 5 miles from Great Basin National Park. This town is home to only 75 residents and has excellent lodging, dining, and recreation options. Baker has several privately owned Airbnbs, motels, RV parks, retreats, and a luxury inn for guests who want to stay near the park. There’s something for everyone in this small town.

For dining, guests enjoy the locally-owned cafes, restaurants, and diners. No matter if you are in the mood for a juicy burger, a home-cooked classic, or a gourmet pizza, you can find something for everyone in Baker.

Baker is an excellent location for guests who enjoy outdoor adventures. The Lehman Caves, Bristlecone Pines, and astronomy opportunities provided by the dark skies make Baker a hub for recreation.

Bottom Line: Baker makes an incredible choice for visitors who want to stay near the park and have plenty to choose from for places to lodge, dine, and explore.

Delta, Utah

Delta is 100 miles from Great Basin National Park. Delta has plenty of options for lodging, dining, and recreation. This town is an excellent place to set up a base camp during a national park vacation.

There are many options for lodging, including budget-friendly motels, RV parks, working ranches, lodges, and privately-owned Airbnbs. Whether you prefer camping in the great outdoors or lodging in a traditional setting, Delta has everything you could need and more.

This town has a variety of mostly locally-owned restaurants with a couple of chain restaurants. From authentic Mexican diners to burger joints, visitors can find exactly what they crave in Delta.

There is no shortage of activities for guests to enjoy. There are art galleries and museums, outdoor adventures like cycling, hiking, and rock climbing, and museums to visit while staying in this spectacular city. No matter what you desire for adventure and excitement, you can find exactly what you are looking for in Delta.

Delta is great for setting up a home base while visiting Great Basin National Park. There’s plenty to do and lots of opportunities for dining and accommodations.

Ely, Nevada

Ely is approximately an hour west of Great Basin National Park. This town has many opportunities for accommodations, dining, and recreation. This town is another excellent option for those who want to set up a home base near the park.

This mountain town has historic hotels, RV resorts, campgrounds, bed and breakfasts, and casino resorts for visitors to choose from for accommodations. Guests can choose from budget-friendly motels to luxury hotels and resorts. Some favorite accommodations of visitors include one-of-a-kind themed motels and unique glamping campgrounds.

The dining scene in Ely is a treat for dining enthusiasts. There’s something for every palate in Ely, from authentic cultural restaurants to old-fashioned diners. With dozens of locally-owned and chain restaurants, the most challenging part of staying in Ely is choosing where to eat daily.

Visitors can choose from various outdoor sports, museums, galleries, and more for recreation and entertainment. Those who prefer outdoor sports can choose from hiking, archery, disc golf, caving, and golfing. History buffs will enjoy the area’s museums, ghost towns, and the Nevada Northern Railway. Visitors who want arts and culture can spend the day at one of the galleries or performing arts centers.

Where To Eat in Great Basin National Park

Great Basin National Park has only one option for dining at the park. However, several choices are just a few minutes from the park. Let’s explore some of the top restaurants in and near Great Basin National Park.

487 Grill

487 Grill
Image Credit: 487 Grill

487 Grill is a burger joint located in Whispering Elms Motel and RV Park in Baker. This top-rated restaurant near Great Basin National Park proudly serves gourmet burgers, salads, and house-made sides. Favorite dishes at 487 Grill include the burger, patty melt, and the 487 Philly steak and cheese.

487 Grill is an excellent option for refueling before, during, or after your park outings. This restaurant is located just a minute from the Great Basin National Park and is open every Wednesday to Saturday.

Great Basin Café

Great Basin Café is the only restaurant located in Great Basin National Park. This dining option is located at the Lehman Caves Visitor Center and is open from April to October.

This restaurant serves breakfast, lunch, desserts, snacks, and drinks, so no matter what you’re craving, you can get what you need here. Favorite meals include quarter-pound hot dogs, smoked brisket, and smokehouse nachos. Great Basin Café is a great place to stop for a quick bite while exploring Great Basin National Park.

Sandra’s Mexican Food

If you find yourself craving authentic Mexican food, be sure to visit Sandra’s Mexican Food in Baker.

This dining option features freshly made tacos with local ingredients, Mexican street corn, homemade horchata, and churros. Customer favorites include carnitas tacos, chicken mole, and tamales. After spending the day at Great Basin National Park, filling up at Sandra’s Mexican Food is a great idea.

Sugar, Salt and Malt Restaurant

Sugar, Salt and Malt Restaurant is just 2.6 miles from Great Basin National Park in Baker. This highly-rated restaurant is an excellent option for visitors who need to grab a bite to eat before, during, or after exploring Great Basin National Park.

Open Friday through Tuesday, the restaurant serves freshly baked goods, café drinks, and gourmet dishes such as pesto-crusted salmon and smoked brisket. Guests rave about their ravioli, gorgonzola beef tips, and the famous root beer floats with homemade vanilla ice cream.

Bottom Line: Whether you are in the mood for a quick café pick-me-up or a full gourmet meal, Sugar Salt and Malt Restaurant has something that will tickle your tastebuds and satisfy you completely.

Great Basin National Park Facts

Great Basin National Park Baker
Image Credit: John Bewlay via Unsplash

1. A New National Park

On October 27, 1986, Great Basin National Park was established by President Ronald Reagan. Before becoming a national park, the area was Lehman Caves National Monument, established in 1922 by President Warren G. Harding.

2. Original People of the Park

Great Basin National Park has a rich cultural history. The original people of this area were the Paleo Indians. This Native American tribe is believed to have lived in this area 12,000 to 9,000 years ago. The Paleo Indians were hunters of big game like bison, mammoths, and ground sloths. Later on, other tribes settled in this area, including the Archaic people, the Fremont, and the Shoshone people.

3. Formed by Glaciers

Glaciers created this incredible national park. Once the glaciers 10,000 years ago began to melt, the area the park protects was carved out. Some of these glaciers can still be seen in the park today. The Lehman Rock Glacier can be seen from the Glacier Trail and the Summit Trail.

4. Highs and Lows

The highest point of elevation at Great Basin National Park is Wheeler Peak which is 13,063 feet tall. The lowest point in the park is at Snake Creek, which is 6,195 feet in elevation.

5. Cave Life

Several unique animals live in the Lehman Caves at Great Basin National Park. These cave-dwelling animals have special adaptations that help them survive and thrive in the cave. Some of these impressive animals include bats, springtails, pseudoscorpions, and amphipods.

6. International Dark Sky Park

In 2016, the International Dark Sky Association designated Great Basin National Park as an International Dark Sky Park. This prestigious honor means incredible opportunities for viewing the stars, planets, galaxies, and more at Great Basin National Park.

7. An Abundance of Animals

Due to the diverse ecosystems present in the park, an abundance of animals make their home in the park. Over 61 types of mammals and hundreds of bird species make their home in the park. Great Basin National Park also has a great list of amphibians, reptiles, and insects seen in the park. This national park is an excellent location for wildlife viewing and birdwatching.

8. Nevada’s Second Highest Peak

Wheeler Peak is the second-tallest mountain in the state of Nevada. This mountain rises to 13,167 feet in elevation.

9. Lehman Caves

A rancher and miner discovered Lehman Caves in 1885 named Absalom Lehman. This cave system is the longest cave in Nevada and measures over 2 miles long. Guided tours take visitors to this incredible park area, and rangers can tell the natural and cultural history of this amazing cave system.

10. Ancient Trees

The trees in Great Basin National Park are some of the oldest in the world. The bristlecone pine is known to be able to live for over 4,000 years. This tree species can survive in extreme weather and climate.

11. Historic Rock Art

Great Basin National Park has some impressive rock art for guests to admire. Upper Pictograph Cave showcases pictographs from ancient history.

It is believed that the Fremont Indians originally painted the pictographs at Upper Cave. This group of people lived in Snake Valley for hundreds of years. The rock art resembles human-like figures as well as animal-shaped figures. These pictures give us clues to the rich cultural history of Great Basin National Park.

Final Thoughts

A trip to Great Basin National Park will be one to remember forever. This national park is bursting with adventure, ready for you to explore from ancient caves to mountain peaks, miles, and miles of hiking trails, to stargazing in some of the darkest skies in America. Book your trip to Great Basin National Park, and discover the beauty that is waiting for you.

Frequently Asked Questions

How much do the entry passes cost at Great Basin National Park?

There is no fee for entering Great Basin National Park. If you plan to camp or tour Lehman Caves, there are fees each individual will have to pay.

How many days should I plan to visit Great Basin National Park?

A 2- to 3-day trip is recommended for visiting Great Basin National Park. This allows for visiting all the main attractions, hiking along some trails, and participating in a few activities or programs.

Which campground is most recommended at Great Basin National Park?

The Upper and Lower Lehman Creek Campgrounds are very popular with visitors. Still, Snake Creek Campground is also a favorite since it is open year-round and is right by the creek.

What is the weather like in Great Basin National Park?

The weather at Great Basin National Park varies throughout the year. The lowest temperature is usually in December, with an average low of 12 degrees. The highest temperatures are generally in July, with an average temperature of 79 degrees.

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About Amar Hussain

Amar is an avid traveler and tester of products. He has spent the last 13 years traveling all 7 continents and has put the products to the test on each of them. He has contributed to publications including Forbes, the Huffington Post, and more.

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