The Ultimate Guide to Tipping Around the World – 190+ Countries

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When you are planning your next big adventure, you will want to be sure to budget for every possible eventuality. One crucial part of international travel that often gets overlooked is tipping those who work super hard to ensure that your experience is perfect.

From bellboys in Bahrain to maids in Monaco, every nation has a different take on tipping, and it pays to know what’s expected of you before you go.

Throughout this guide, we have provided guidance on what to tip in U.S. dollars. Unless otherwise noted, we are suggesting tipping the dollar-equivalent in local currency.

Table of contents

Table of Contents

Where Can I Use U.S. Dollars Abroad?

The U.S. dollar is used in quite a few countries abroad. Some countries use it as their main currency, some have their own currency pegged to the U.S. dollar, and others are visited a lot by American tourists and have chosen to accept U.S. dollars.

Below is a list of countries where U.S. dollars are used. Where the U.S. dollar is used alongside the local currency it is always best to double-check whether U.S. dollars are accepted at smaller establishments.

U.S. Dollar is Main Currency
British Virgin IslandsMarshall IslandsTimor-LesteZimbabwe
EcuadorMicronesiaTurks and Caicos
El SalvadorPalauU.S.¹

¹ Including American Samoa, American Virgin Islands, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, and Puerto Rico

U.S. Dollar is Used Along With Local Currency
ArubaCayman IslandsMaldivesSint Eustatius
BahamasCosta RicaMexico¹Sint Maarten
BarbadosCuraçaoMyanmarSomalia
BelizeEthiopiaNicaraguaSt. Kitts and Nevis
BonaireGuyanaPanamaSudan
CambodiaHondurasPhilippines²Trinidad & Tobago
Canada¹LiberiaSabaVietnam³

¹ Only accepted in tourist areas/border cities
² Only in touristy areas
³ Only in big hotels or shops in major cities

Hot Tip: When using U.S. dollars abroad, make sure to take crisp, clean bills, otherwise they may be rejected when trying to pay for goods or services.

Tipping Etiquette & Guide for Africa

Algeria
Image Credit: SofieLayla Thal via Pixabay

Algeria

This North African country is full of Roman ruins and Ottoman landmarks. Tipping isn’t common in most parts of Algeria, but in some of the more touristy resorts, you will be expected to add a gratuity to your bill.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Larger restaurants will either add a service charge to your bill or expect you to add 5-10 percent to the cost of your meal as a tip. Algeria is a Muslim country, so there are not many bars to be found here.
  • Hotels – Tip your maid around $1 (in local currency) a night, and add the same again for the bellboy or porter. Servers would also appreciate a small tip with your bill.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides and drivers should be tipped around 10 percent of the value of the tour or cost of the drive.

Angola

Despite its long stretches of tropical Atlantic beaches and vast arid desserts, Angola is not yet stable enough to be a serious contender for the tourist dollar. Tipping here is rare, and in some cases, frowned upon.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Some restaurants will add a service charge to your bill, and in others, you could simply add 10 percent of the total bill as a tip. Most local restaurants and small eateries do not encourage tipping.
  • Hotels – Keep small bills and loose change to tip both the bellboy when they deliver your bag and the maids every morning.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tourist guides and drivers are the only staff who regularly receive high-value tips, and you should consider paying them 5-10 percent of the tour’s total cost at the end of your adventure.

Benin Tipping Guide

As the birthplace of voodoo, this West African country is surprisingly one of the safest places to visit in Africa. On the whole, tourism is very much in its infancy across the country, and tipping is not yet standardized.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Tips are not compulsory, but if service is not included, you should consider adding 10 percent to the bill. You can tip bartenders with change, but it is not common.
  • Hotels – Bellboys, porters, maids, and even front of house staff will gratefully receive tips in local currency.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – If you are going on a safari, consider tipping the guide 10 percent of the total cost and the driver a further 5 percent at the end of the tour.

Botswana

Botswana is the land of big game safaris, conservation projects, and colorful local cultures. With visitors from all over the world coming to experience the national parks and game reserves, tipping is expected in the tourist regions.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Add 10 percent in larger bars and restaurants, or just round up the bill in smaller establishments.
  • Hotels – You can tip the bellboy, maids, and other staff using low denomination local currency if you wish to.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tips are often asked for here. If you are going on a tour, consider tipping the guide 10 percent of the total cost and the driver a further 5 percent.

Burkina Faso

This beautiful country is packed full of unique landscapes and exciting cultures. Still, sadly, the political instability, paired with high rates of crime, has turned the country into a virtual no-go area for international visitors at present. If the situation improves, tips will be welcome but not compulsory.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Round up the bill or add 10 percent to the bill.
  • Hotels – All hotel staff will be happy to receive small tips in local currency.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Both tour guides and drivers should receive a tip at the end of the tour. Decide between you how much you should pay based on the service you have received, but 5-10 percent is normal.
Burundi
Image Credit: quentcourtois0 via Pixabay

Burundi

Burundi is another African country that has sadly been blighted by ethnic conflict, and at present, visitors are advised not to go there. If the situation changes, the country will need to ensure the security of future visitors.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Add local currency ($1-$2) to the bill to thank the staff.
  • Hotels – Again, the local currency ($1 or so) will be appreciated by bellboys, porters, maids, and house staff.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – If you are going on a tour, you should take extra cash to tip both the tour and the driver. Some areas can be very unsafe, so the service they provide to keep you safe is vital and priceless. 5-10 percent is about right and remember to tip discreetly.

Cabo Verde

Cabo Verde offers undulating landscapes, year-round sunshine, and a warm Creole welcome. Visitors come to escape the cold north European winters and experience the lively bars, sandy beaches, and growing tourist trade. Tipping is not compulsory, but commonplace in tourist areas.

  • Restaurants and Bars – It’s common to tip at restaurants, typically around 5-10 percent of the bill.
  • Hotels – Leave a tip for the bellboy, maid, and other staff in local currency. The equivalent of $1 will be enough.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Leave around 10 percent of the total cost for the tour guide and at least 5 percent for the driver.

Cameroon

At the heart of the African continent, Cameroon is a lively land full of unique cultures and landscapes. Certain parts of the country are, however, considered dangerous for Western travelers to visit due to high crime rates, kidnapping, and piracy. If you do visit, tipping here is customary but not compulsory.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You should either add 10 percent to your restaurant bill or round up in smaller establishments.
  • Hotels – Leave the local equivalent of $2-$5 for your bellboy, maids, waiters, and other hotel staff.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should be sure to have enough money with you to leave up to $15 (in local currency) per day for your tour guides and drivers.

Central African Republic

CAR is currently in the midst of a bitter civil war, making it a challenging destination for international travelers. An ancient nation with a unique history, the tourism trade is very minimal here, meaning tips are not commonplace but always appreciated.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Either round up your bill or leave a small amount of local currency.
  • Hotels – Provide staff who assist you with small amounts of local currency.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Your tour guide and driver will be responsible for your safety while you are away from your hotel, so you should tip them generously.

Chad

Chad is an unlikely travel destination that rewards the intrepid with stunning scenery and fascinating cultures. In some of the larger cities, tipping is customary.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Tips for good service are appreciated — you should consider around 10 percent in restaurants.
  • Hotels – Have small change and local currency on hand to tip the bellboy, maids, and waitstaff.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should leave your tour guide and driver with 10 percent of the tour or round up, depending on which is greater.
Comoros
Image Credit: mbrand85 via Shutterstock

Comoros

Made up of a small group of islands in the Indian Ocean, paradise awaits with white sandy beaches, coral reefs, and coconut palms as standard. The islands are volcanic and very remote, meaning that tourism is not well established here — tipping is commonplace but not compulsory.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Tipping in restaurants and bars is common, and you should aim to tip 10 percent of the bill.
  • Hotels – You should tip the bellboy per bag and the maid per night around $1-$2 in local currency.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should tip your guide and driver in the region of 10 percent.

Congo

Home to gorillas, fantastic wildlife, and unique fauna, Congo is also a challenging destination due to the high risk of violent crime, kidnapping, and ongoing civil unrest. Tipping is expected in larger establishments and tourist spots.

  • Restaurants and Bars – More upscale restaurants will expect you to leave a tip — 5-7 percent of the bill is normal.
  • Hotels – Keep some smaller denomination local notes to use to tip the bellboy per bag and the maid every morning.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers will not expect a tip. For tour guides, expect to tip the local equivalent of $10 per day per person and for drivers, $10 per day from your whole group.

Côte d’Ivoire

With stunning coastlines and lush interiors, Côte d’Ivoire offers cosmopolitan cities, historic architecture, unique cultures, and a warm welcome. Tipping is commonplace but not compulsory here.

  • Restaurants and Bars – A service charge is usually added to more upscale restaurant bills, and where it is not, a tip of 10-15 percent is acceptable.
  • Hotels – If you are happy with the service, tip the bellboy and the maid in local currency.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers will not expect a tip as it is usual to haggle down the price before you ride. Tour guides and drivers should receive 5-10 percent of the total cost of the tour.

Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)

This land of rainforests, gushing rivers, and smoking volcanoes is also the victim of a brutal 20th-century civil war and ongoing political unrest. Many areas of the country are considered “no-go” zones to foreign nationals due to the high risk of violent crime, terrorism, and piracy. Tipping here is not mandatory or standardized, but always welcome.

  • Restaurants and Bars – For larger restaurants, add 5-7 percent of the bill. You may want to round it up in smaller establishments.
  • Hotels – If you are happy with the service, tip the bellboy and the maid in local currency (around $1 or so) and keep a bunch of bills close at hand for porters, waiters, and other staff, too.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers will not expect a tip. Tour guides and drivers should receive 5-10 percent of the total cost of the tour.

Djibouti

With mountains on 1 side and the Red Sea on the other, Djibouti offers extreme contrasts and stunning scenery as well as ancient architecture and rich and diverse cultures. Warm and welcoming, this tiny African nation loves to receive visitors, and tipping is becoming more commonplace.

  • Restaurants and Bars – It is customary for diners to leave around 10 percent in restaurants.
  • Hotels – Have small local bills at hand to tip your bellboy or porter by the bag, and the same for the maid service.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tip your driver and your tour guide $10-$12 per person per day in local currency.
Egypt
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Egypt

Take a trip back in time to the land of the pyramids, the Red Sea, ancient cities, and bustling bazaars as you join over 8 million tourists who visit every year. Tipping is customary in Egypt.

  • Restaurants and Bars – It is good etiquette to leave a tip of at least 10 percent in restaurants in Egypt. Some establishments will already add a service charge to the bill, but this does not go to the waiters, so add more if you can.
  • Hotels – You should tip your bellboy or porter per bag, and always leave a small daily tip for the housekeeping service. You may also want to tip the front of the house and door staff, too, and you should keep small bills close at hand at all times.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – For guides taking you out a full-day tour, you should consider leaving the local equivalent of around $6 and the same amount per day for longer trips.

Equatorial Guinea

As Africa’s least visited country, not many Westerners have discovered the world’s second-largest rainforest, scientific reserves, black volcanic beaches, and extensive wildlife, including gorillas and sea turtles. In general, tipping is not customary across the region.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Only in upscale or expat establishments would you be expected to tip around 10 percent of the bill.
  • Hotels – You can tip the bellboy, porter, maids, and other staff using the local currency at your discretion.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides and private drivers will also appreciate a tip of around 10 percent, depending on the length of the tour.

Eritrea

Packed full of often challenging, but always beautiful landscapes, and considered to be one of the most authentic countries in all of Africa, Eritrea is a country just waiting to be discovered. Tipping in Eritrea is always appreciated but never expected in most parts of the country.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Only in the larger towns or cities would you be expected to tip in restaurants or bars. The standard 10 percent tip is acceptable in most places or rounding up in smaller cafes.
  • Hotels – You can leave your bellboy, porter, maids, and other staff small bills as a tip.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Smaller independent service providers like taxi drivers, tour guides, or travel agents would always appreciate a little extra.

Ethiopia

With a rich cultural heritage, stunning architecture, and picturesque landscapes, many travelers to this remote part of the world come to join guided tours or treks, and local guides will expect a gratuity. Tipping in Ethiopia is not compulsory, but always very welcome.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Larger bars and restaurants may already add the 10 or 15 percent service charge to your bill. If they do not, expect to tip at least 10 percent of your bill or 5 percent for local places.
  • Hotels – Around $0.30 in local currency is fine for hotel staff per service or per day.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Local guides and drivers can make significant tips, especially on overnight tours or with larger groups of travelers. Consider a daily tip of $6-$12 depending on the service. You can also tip in U.S. dollars rather than local currency.

Gabon

Home to dense rainforests, stunning white-sandy beaches, and some of the most beautiful landscapes in the world, Gabon is a picture-perfect paradise for nature and wildlife enthusiasts. There is no established rate for tipping, but a little extra is always appreciated.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Bars and restaurants that are heavily frequented by tourists may expect a tip of around 10 percent of your bill, but smaller establishments will not.
  • Hotels – Leave what you feel you can. It will always be appreciated.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Again, there is no set amount to tip, but rounding up taxi fares or leaving 5-10 percent for guides is a nice gesture.
Ghana Fisherman
Image Credit: hbieser via Pixabay

Ghana

Ghana is considered one of the safest and most prosperous of all the African nations, and it is one that offers a warm welcome to thousands of visitors from all over the world every year. While there is not necessarily a set protocol for tipping across the country, a tip is expected and always appreciated.

  • Restaurants and Bars – In tourist areas, beach resorts, and big cities, the standard 10-15 percent is usually expected.
  • Hotels – Resort hotel staff will expect to receive a tip, and porters and waitstaff will also expect a cedi or 2. You should remember to leave something for the maids, too.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers should receive 5-10 percent; tour guides and other drivers would appreciate 10 percent of the tour cost.

Guinea

A health crisis and political instability may have blighted the West African nation of Guinea, but its diverse landscapes, virgin rainforests, and the lively capital city of Conakry still draw in fearless adventurers who come to enjoy an authentic taste of Africa. One of the poorer nations on the African continent, tipping is not generally expected.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If no service fee has been added to your bill, 10 percent is a good rule to go by.
  • Hotels – 10 percent would work well when you dine-in, and you can tip your bellboy, porter, maid, and other staff with small notes if you want to.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should factor in the cost of an additional day’s wages as a tip.

Guinea-Bissau

This tiny African nation has a Latin vibe from its Portuguese heritage, diverse landscapes, and welcoming people. Ravaged by a political and military crisis over the years, there is still plenty of faded beauty to be found here. Guinea-Bissau is not a rich country by any means, and tipping is not widely expected.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If no service fee has been added to your bill, add the usual 10 percent in larger eateries.
  • Hotels – Hotel staff should receive local currency as a tip of about $1, but this will only be in high-end hotels.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Guided tours are recommended as solo travel can be dangerous. Therefore, tip your guides and drivers generously, at least 1 extra day’s wages.

Kenya

Kenya is a popular destination for travelers looking to capture the delights of The Big 5 up close on safari. It has a thriving economy and suffers very little from political instability. Many Kenyans work within the tourist industry and rely heavily on tips to supplement their incomes. Tips should also be provided in the local currency, the Kenyan shilling.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You should expect to leave at least 10 percent of the total cost of the bill as your tip — physically hand it to your server when you pay.
  • Hotels – Tip your porter $0.50-$2 in local currency when you arrive, then be sure to tip your maid every day, or $3-$5 per week to ensure that you receive the very best service.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tip your tour guide $1-$2 in local currency per day, per person, and the same for your driver, also. Round up your fare to the nearest 100 shillings for taxi drivers.

Lesotho

The South African nation of Lesotho is famous for its mountainous landscapes that are just right for hiking and horseback riding, as well as seasonal sports like skiing and abseiling. Tipping in Lesotho pretty much follows the same rules as tipping in South Africa, and you will be expected to leave gratuities. Wages can be low in the region, so tips are relied upon by local workers.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You should expect to leave 10-15 percent of the total cost of the bill as your tip in bars and restaurants.
  • Hotels – You should aim to tip the bellboy or porter 5-10 loti ($0.36-$0.72) and around the same for your maid each night.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You will be expected to tip on your tour. Look to provide your drivers and guides with around 10 percent of the tour or 15 percent for exceptional service.
Liberia
Image Credit: Louisen via Shutterstock

Liberia

Liberia is a country with a dark past, and not one that is at the top of most people’s must-see travel lists. It is, however, a country that is slowly transforming, and there is genuine African beauty to be found beneath the faded exterior. If you do choose to visit, tipping is not expected, but most workers’ wages are low, so any gratuities are gratefully received. You can tip in local currency or with U.S. dollars.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Some restaurants will automatically add a service charge to the bill, but if it is not included, a 10 percent tip is normal.
  • Hotels – You should leave a tip for your maids every day (the local equivalent of a couple of dollars a day), and pass a few dollars to the porter on arrival.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – If you hire a guide or driver, you should tip roughly 5 percent; round up taxi fares where possible.

Libya

Libya is not only home to unique landscapes and Roman historical landmarks, but it is also unique in that the country does not promote or recommend tipping. Currently a country that is not recommended for tourists due to the ongoing civil unrest, those that do need to be there should be careful not to tip.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Tipping is not required in restaurants. You may see a service charge on your bill. Alcohol is prohibited in Libya, so bars are always attached to eateries.
  • Hotels – Tipping is not required at your hotel, either, although a service charge may appear on your room bill.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides and drivers will not expect a tip, and will often refuse it, but you can leave a small tip if you want to.

Madagascar

Famous for its sweeping canyons, diverse landscapes, and ring-tailed lemurs, Madagascar has a rich colonial history that includes a loosely observed protocol for tipping. It is not expected that locals tip each other, but tourists are expected to be generous with their gratuities.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If the service charge is not already included in the bill, 10-15 percent is recommended.
  • Hotels – You should tip your porter and house cleaning staff in local currency, and expect to pay around ~$0.50 per bag and up to $1.50 for your maid each day.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides expect to receive tips from foreigners, so anticipate paying around $7-10 for your guide and about ~$5 per day for the driver (all in local currency).

Malawi

Malawi is famous for its national parks and wildlife reserves and is a magnet for visitors looking to experience the African outdoors at their finest. Tipping is not compulsory across the country, but wages are low, and it is always appreciated.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If the service charge is not already included in the bill, you should add 10-15 percent of the total bill as a tip.
  • Hotels – You should tip your porters the local equivalent of $1 and your maids a little more.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides should be given a tip at the end of your tour, and you should budget for around $3 per day, per person in local currency.

Mali

Due to political disruption, Mali may not be on the top of your travel wish list, but in less turbulent times, it is worth remembering that it is the home of Timbuktu and the Great Mosque of Djenné. While tipping isn’t necessarily customary in Mali, per se, it is very much appreciated as wages are low.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You can add the 10 percent to the bill, if you are feeling generous, or simply round up your bill or bar tab to an even number.
  • Hotels – You could offer the bellboy just a couple of dollars and leave the same for the maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You will almost certainly need a tour guide in this region as it can be dangerous, so tip generously. Consider giving around $8 per day in local currency and half again to the driver.

Mauritania

With landscapes that are reminiscent of a Mad Max film and a population so small you can go for days without seeing another human being, the vast open landscapes of Mauritania have an ethereal, post-apocalyptic beauty. Because much of the country is unpopulated, tipping would only be expected in large towns or cities.

  • Restaurants and Bars – More upscale eateries may expect to receive 10-15 percent of the bill, or you could simply round up the bill at more basic establishments.
  • Hotels – You can choose to leave a small gratuity for your maids, and offer the porter loose local bills if you have them.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides do expect to receive a tip, and you should estimate around 10 percent per guest, or maybe more if you are away for days at a time.
Mauritius
Image Credit: John O’Nolan via Unsplash

Mauritius

This African island in the Indian ocean offers picture-perfect beaches, a heady mix of cultures and community, and is a true taste of paradise right here on earth. A popular destination for honeymooners and couples, there is no protocol for tipping.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Larger establishments may add the service charge to your bill, or you can leave a 10 percent tip if they haven’t. Smaller bars and eateries won’t have the same expectations, but rounding up wouldn’t be amiss.
  • Hotels – Government taxes are added to your bill to cover service charges, but you can leave a few hundred rupees at the end of your trip for your porters and maids if you wish to.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides do expect to receive a tip, and you could consider 10 percent of the total cost of your tour for the guide and around half of the same for the driver.

Morocco

One of the most popular Arab nations for Western tourists to visit, Morocco, is a land of bustling bazaars, blue seas, and arid deserts. With an ever-growing tourist-trade in the coastal resorts and bigger cities, tipping is common.

  • Restaurants and Bars – More upscale bars and restaurants will usually add a 10 percent service charge to your bill, but if they haven’t, you can round up and add it yourselves.
  • Hotels – Keep aside around $5 in local currency for your bellboy and around the same again per day for the maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Round up your taxi fare, or keep spare change for a tip. Your tour guide will expect to be well rewarded, so consider around $27 per guest (in local currency), and pay your guide at the end of the tour.

Mozambique

Mozambique remains one of the most unspoiled and underdeveloped tourist destinations in the world, with visitors coming to see the stunning coastline and some of the finest coral reefs in the world. Tipping is a standard practice in more developed areas, and you can expect to pay around 10 percent for decent service.

  • Restaurants and Bars – More upscale bars and restaurants will usually add a 10 percent service charge to your bill, but if they haven’t, you can add the 10 percent yourself.
  • Hotels – Hotel porters, cleaners, and maids will usually expect to receive the local equivalent of $1-$2 per day.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Round up your taxi fare to show your appreciation to the taxi driver, and your tour guide should expect to receive around $5 per person per day in local currency.

Namibia

Namibia is immense, empty, and one of the safest places to visit on the African continent. Tourists come to see unspoiled beaches, extensive wildlife, and vast national parks and are free to tip as, and when, they feel the service they have received warrants it.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Consider leaving a gratuity equal to 10 percent of the total bill, but no more than $10 in local currency, and the same for upscale bars.
  • Hotels – Hotel porters can expect to receive around $5 in local bills and the same per day for the housekeeping staff.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides usually receive a higher gratuity, and you should consider as much as $3.50 per guest per half-day tour and double that for a full-day excursion, all in local currency.

Niger

Beset by military crisis and tribal uprisings, Niger is not considered a safe place to visit. But, if the situation changes and the travel warnings lift, you could visit a country that offers vast shifting deserts, mud-brick mosques, lively markets, and the faded beauty of traditional African towns. Tipping is very much appreciated across the country, and although not formally standardized, 10 percent seems about right across the board.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Some places will add the 10 percent service charge to your bill. If not, you should include it in your payment. Some establishments will expect you to tip a further 10 percent on top of the bill anyway.
  • Hotels – Hotel porters and maids would appreciate small notes for each interaction you have with them.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour drivers, tour guides, and even taxi drivers will all expect a 10 percent tip, too.
Nigeria
Image Credit: Muhammadtaha Ibrahim via Unsplash

Nigeria

Nigeria is famous for its magnificent wildlife, awesome forests, and epic mountain ranges, as well as bustling cities and lively, fun-loving locals. Popular with tourists from all over the world, tipping is standardized at around 10 percent across most services industries.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Some places will add the 10 percent service charge to your bill, but if they haven’t, you should remember to add it to your payment.
  • Hotels – A tip of around $2 in local bills or so is enough for bellboys and porters who help with your bags; consider leaving double for your maid daily.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Most taxi fares will have a tip built into them for tourists, and you should agree on the cost before you ride. For organized tours, you should tip the guide around $10 per day in local currency and half again for the driver.

Rwanda

Home to the Nyungwe National Park with its vast wildlife and conservation projects, bustling cities, and a comfortable climate all year round, more and more tourists are choosing to visit Rwanda. Tipping is not customary in Rwanda, meaning you are usually free to give as much or as little as you want to.

  • Restaurants and Bars – More upscale bars and restaurants will expect around a 10 percent service charge; use your discretion for smaller establishments.
  • Hotels – Just as you would do back at home, you can tip your bellboy, porter, and even the maids with small bills. The local currency is preferable to U.S. dollars.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers do not usually expect a tip, and you should agree on the price before you ride. For tour guides and drivers, consider the local equivalent of $5-$10 per day.

São Tomé and Principe

These 2 tiny islands offer a real taste of paradise with miles of sandy beaches, lush green forests, and beautiful old colonial buildings. Still very much off of the radar of most travelers, São Tomé and Principe — also known as STP — offer the simple life in the sunshine. Tipping is very much at your discretion here.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Consider adding 5-10 percent to your bill.
  • Hotels – Tip your porter, bellboy, and maids with small local bills when you see them.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers will give you a guided tour for just a few dollars more if you ask them, and organized tours would probably warrant just a $10 or so tip per day (in local currency).

Senegal

This West African nation, with its breathtaking beaches, lively street markets, and the bustling city of Dakar, is one of the most stable countries in the region. Tipping is not standardized everywhere, but larger cities and tourist destinations will expect you to leave 10-15 percent. You should always try to tip in the local currency to ensure the recipient receives the full amount.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If a service charge is not included, you should consider leaving 10-15 percent of the final bill.
  • Hotels – Tip your maid with small bills in the region of $2 or $3 per day in local bills, and offer the porter a smaller sum for their help with your bags.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides can expect to receive $15 and $20 per day (in local currency) and your driver half of that again.
Seychelles
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Seychelles

The ultimate honeymoon destination, Seychelles is a group of small islands scattered across the Indian Ocean that offers some of the most beautiful beaches in the world, set against a backdrop of lush hills and palm trees. The islands have a wealth of luxury accommodations to offer those looking to enjoy the very best, and therefore most establishments will already include a service charge of 5-10 percent into your final bill.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If a service charge is not included, you should leave 5-10 percent of the bill.
  • Hotels – Tipping at hotels is at your discretion — you may want to tip the porter around $2 and $5 for the housekeeping staff, all in local currency.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Depending on the length of the tour, you should expect to leave $5 in local currency for a half-day tour and $10 for a whole-day tour.

Sierra Leone

Now safe and Ebola-free, Sierra Leone is one of the few places on earth where you can get up close and personal with pygmy hippos, visit the Gola National Rainforest Park, or admire the famous multi-colored houses of Freetown. Tipping is discretionary in Sierra Leone, but wages are low, and being rewarded for good service is gratefully appreciated.

  • Restaurants and Bars – A service charge of about 10 percent is included in restaurant and hotel bills. Otherwise, you may add it yourself if you want to.
  • Hotels – Tipping at hotels is also at your discretion, and you may want to tip the porter or the maid small bills or loose change.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – It is common practice to tip guides and drivers at the end of your trip or tour, although there is no set amount, and you and the other guests should decide how much between you.

Somalia

With an infrastructure that is still recovering from a quarter of a century of civil war, Somalia is a faded beauty that has yet to be considered safe enough to entice visitors back to its shores. That said, internal investments are slowly starting to bring back hope to the country’s pristine beaches and varied landscapes. Tipping is not standard procedure in Somalia.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If you wish to leave a tip, follow the general 10 percent rule.
  • Hotels – Keep a supply of small bills, either in U.S. dollars or in the local currency, to hand to bellboys or leave for your maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Again, there is no set protocol, so tip your tour guide or driver in cash at the end of your tour.

South Africa

South Africa is a beautiful country, packed full of diverse landscapes, rugged coastlines, fantastic wildlife watching opportunities, cosmopolitan cities, and some of the most beautiful vineyards in the world. Despite a sometimes difficult past, the country now has a thriving tourist industry. Tipping is expected across the service and hospitality industries.

  • Restaurants and Bars – 10 percent of the bill is the standard procedure here in South Africa, although restaurants may apply the service charge automatically for larger groups of diners. Bars will also usually expect the same.
  • Hotels – Hotel porters should be tipped 10-20 rand (that’s up to $1.50), and depending on the length of your stay, housekeeping staff should receive the same per day when you check out.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – For your taxi rides in South Africa, round up to the nearest 100 rand; for organized guides and tours, you could leave the local equivalent of as much as $7 per day for your guide and half again for the driver.

Sudan

Sudan may have had its troubles in recent years, but as home to more pyramids than Egypt and some of the friendliest people on earth, a visit to this mostly undiscovered country will take your breath away. Still waiting to realize its full potential on the tourist trail, tipping has not been standardized in Sudan.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Service charges in Sudan are generally always included in the bill which means that there is no need for you to tip any extra.
  • Hotels – Keep small bills in U.S. dollars to hand to porters, bellboys, and housekeeping staff as and when you want to.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You may want to hire the services of a guide during your stay, and you might be with them for some time. Expect to tip the tour guide up to $10 per day and the same again for the driver.
Swaziland
Image Credit: Amar Hussain

Swaziland (eSwatini)

The tiny kingdom of Swaziland, now renamed eSwatini, is bright, beautiful, and full of authentic African landscapes and cultures. It is also considered to be much safer than its neighbor, South Africa. There are lots of Westernized bars, restaurants, and hotels in the more urban areas, and with them come standardized tipping procedures and expectations.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You should expect to pay 10 percent of the total bill if it is not already included as a service charge.
  • Hotels – You should expect to hand over 10 rand (less than $1) to your bellboy or porter, and leave a little more for your maid or housekeeping staff per day.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should set aside at least $5 in local currency for a half-day tour and $10 for a full-day tour, with more to be given on multi-day tours. Taxi fares should be negotiated before you set off.

Tanzania

Tanzania is a country of contrasts. Whether you come to climb Kilimanjaro, relax on the beaches for your honeymoon, or trek out to explore the spice island of Zanzibar, this is a country that is popular with adventurers from all over the world. The rise in Western visitors has led to tipping becoming customary in restaurants and resorts in more touristy areas.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You should expect to pay 5 percent in bars and restaurants where the service charge is not already included.
  • Hotels – Keep small local notes to hand for fast tipping and tip around $2 for the bellboy and $4 for the maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers -Safari tours are a huge draw in Tanzania, and you can expect to hand over around $15 a day in local currency for your tour guide and the same again for the driver.

The Gambia 

As one of the smallest nations in Africa, the Gambia is home to a stunning Atlantic coastline and year-round sunshine, making it a popular destination for Northern Europeans looking for some affordable winter sun. With a wealth of resort hotels, bars, and restaurants set up to accommodate its rise in popularity, tipping is becoming a more commonplace, too. Wages are also very low, so tipping goes a long way towards supplementing the wages of many local workers.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You should expect to pay up to 7.5 percent in bars and restaurants where the service charge is not already included.
  • Hotels – You should expect to tip the bellboy $2 in local currency for carrying your bags and leave a few more for your maid. Most hotels will have tip boxes if you don’t want to leave money lying around in your room.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – For safari and tour guides at camps and lodges, you should tip $10-$15 per person per day in local currency and half that for the driver.

Togo

Togo is a poor country with a rich history, a stunning Atlantic coastline, lush green forests, and open savannah. Visitors come to explore the country on foot and take long hikes through Togo’s diverse landscapes. Tipping is not expected in most establishments in Togo.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You should only expect to pay 10 percent service charge or tip at upscale eateries or bars.
  • Hotels – Wages are poor here, so tips for your bellboy, porters, servers, and maids will be gratefully received. A couple of dollars in local bills here goes a long way.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – For organized tours, you should keep $5-$10 per person per day (in local currency) and half that for the driver.

Tunisia

With a wealth of gorgeous Mediterranean beaches, year-round sunshine, bustling markets, and affordable accommodation, Tunisia is the perfect North African location for a sunshine vacation. With lots of great tourist destinations to choose from all along the coast, and hotels, bars, and restaurants to suit all budgets, tipping here has become the norm. In fact, tips make up a considerable percentage of the local workers’ wages, so it is important to tip every time.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Help bolster your server’s wages by including a tip of around 10-15 percent of the bill, or round up the bill to the nearest 10 dinars.
  • Hotels – You should expect to provide the bellboy or porter with $2 in local currency for their assistance, and you should leave the maid as much as $7 per week.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – For organized tours, you should be ready to give your tour guide as much as an extra $7-$18 in local currency for full tours and multi-day visits.

Tipping Etiquette & Guide for the Americas

Antigua
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Antigua and Barbuda

These West Indian islands that lie perfectly between the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean offer tropical rainforests, luscious beaches, and upscale tourist resorts. Tipping on the islands is customary and expected.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Service charges in restaurants will usually be 10 percent when added. If they are not, diners should leave at least 5 percent on top of their bill and even leave a little more for waitstaff that has provided good service.
  • Hotels – Many all-inclusive resorts do not encourage tipping, and it could jeopardize the employment status of the staff. Ask before you tip, and if you can, around $1 per bag in local currency is good for bellboys with a little more for the maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers expect a 10-15 percent tip and a small tip for handling luggage. Guided tours and chartered crew boats can also command as much as 10-15 percent per day on top of the cost of the tour.

Argentina

Argentina is a huge country lying at the southernmost point of South America. As a country where you can find glaciers, deserts, mountains, jungle, sandy beaches, and vibrant cities all in 1 place, many visitors come every year to experience its beauty. Tipping is very much the norm here.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Service charges in restaurants will usually be 10 percent when added. If they are not, diners should leave at least 5 percent on top of their bill and even leave a little more for waitstaff that have provided good service.
  • Hotels – You should leave the doorman or bellboy at least 1 peso per bag and a few for the maid every day.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Paid tours command around 10-20 percent as a tip, and for “free” tours you should budget for around 100 pesos ($1.67) for half-day tours or more for full-day tours.

Barbados

The island of Barbados is home to endless white sandy beaches, historical monuments, grand plantation houses, and exquisite botanical gardens, as well as luxurious all-inclusive hotels and first-class water sports, food, and nightlife. With such a booming tourist trade, tipping is customary in Barbados. U.S. dollars are accepted across the island, though you may receive change in Barbados dollars. The Barbados dollar is fixed at 2:1 U.S. dollars.

  • Restaurants and Bars – While the standard rate of tipping in Barbados is 10 percent, restaurants will often add a service charge of 10-15 percent in tourist resorts. Bartenders should also be tipped 10-15 percent of the total bill.
  • Hotels – Aim to tip your bellboy or porter around $1 per bag, and leave $2 in your room every day to tip the maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tipping your tour guide is not expected but gratefully received. Consider offering them around 10 percent of the total cost of the tour and half that again for the driver.

Belize

Situated on the western edge of the Caribbean Sea, Belize is home to world-class scuba diving, ancient Mayan ruins, and vibrant cities. Not yet firmly on the tourist map, Belize is a great destination for adventurous explorers. Tipping is not standardized, but it is commonplace. The Belize dollar is tied to the U.S. dollar at a rate of 2:1 and both currencies are widely used.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Most upscale eateries and bars will add a service charge of 10-15 percent to your bill. You may leave more if you feel the service was exceptional.
  • Hotels – Many hotels add a 10 percent service charge to your bill when you check out. This is to cover the costs of the bellboys, maids, and other staff. You may leave more if you wish to.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides expect to receive around 10-15 percent of the price of the tour or $5-$10 per person per day. Diving instructors should also expect to receive anything from 10-20 percent of the dive costs or the equivalent of a dive tank hire instead.

Bolivia

Bolivia is a big hit with adventurers looking to hike, climb, ride, and even glide across some of the most diverse and interesting landscapes in all of South America. A warm and welcoming people, Bolivians don’t so much believe in tipping, but they are likely to expect you to pay for small favors and help.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If you are happy with the service you have received, expect to add 5-10 percent to the total cost of the bill.
  • Hotels – You can keep loose change and low-value notes at hand to give to the bellboy, the doorman, and even the bartender, or leave in your room for the maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides command more than waiting or hospitality staff. You should expect to pay your guide an additional 10-15 percent of the tour price and maybe half of that for the driver.
Brazil
Image Credit: Agustín Diaz via Unsplash

Brazil

This bright, beautiful, and brilliant nation is a major draw for tourists from all over the world. With white sandy beaches, vibrant nightlife, stunning scenery, and acres of rainforest, Brazil is always in fashion. Tipping here is very much the norm, and something you should expect to pay on top of your bills.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You should expect to add at least 10 percent to the cost of your bill.
  • Hotels – You will need to have the cash to hand to tip the bellboy, porters, doormen, bar staff, and the maids. 1-2 real ($0.25-$0.50) should be enough.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – At the end of the tour, the driver or guide will usually pass a hat around. You can give what you feel they deserve, but around 10 percent of the tour price is typical. Taxi drivers do not expect a tip but appreciate the fare being rounded up.

Canada

Canada is a country of snowcapped peaks, deep green forests, vibrant cities, and friendly, welcoming locals. Tourists come to enjoy camping, skiing, snowboarding, golfing, fishing, hiking, mountain biking, climbing, kayaking, and a wealth of other outdoor activities. Tipping here is expected and commonplace. U.S. dollars may be accepted in tourist areas and border cities.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Expect to pay anywhere 15-20 percent on top of your bill as a minimum. Bartenders should also be tipped $1-$2 in local currency on every round of drinks you buy.
  • Hotels – Tip the porter or bellboy $1-$2 per bag, the housekeeper and valet $2-$3 per day, and the concierge $10-$20, all in local currency.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – If you have enjoyed the tour, you should tip your driver and tour guide at the end of the activity. Around 10 percent of the tour price is a good start.

Cayman Islands

As one of the most upscale areas of the Caribbean, the Cayman Islands has plenty of exclusive retreats, beautiful empty beaches, and first-class amenities, as well as water sports for everyone. Tipping is very much expected across the islands. U.S. dollars are readily accepted island-wide.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Your tax and service will already be included at around 15 percent, but you can leave more on top if you wish. You should also tip your bartender at least an extra $1 for each order.
  • Hotels – You may have a service charge added to your bill, but you will still be expected to tip. Consider tipping the bellboy around $1-$2 per bag and the maid $1-$2 a night. Your concierge should receive around $20 at the end of your stay.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – For tours by car or by boat, as well as trips out on the water, you should add at least $5-$15 per person per day.

Chile

Chile is the perfect destination for outdoor enthusiasts who want to enjoy a diverse variety of landscapes, including volcanoes, deserts, beaches, and forests, as well as friendly and welcoming people. Tipping is expected in all of the tourist areas.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You should add at least 10 percent to your restaurant bill if it is not already included. Even if it is, you should still consider leaving an extra 5 percent that should be handed directly to the waiter.
  • Hotels – You should leave a tip for everyone that helps you out. Consider 1000 pesos (~$1.26) for the maids, 500 pesos (~$0.63) for the bellboy, and 5,000-10,000 pesos (~$6.30-$12.61) for the concierge.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides rely heavily on tips in Chile. You should, therefore, offer them at least 5,000-15,000 pesos (~$6.30-$12.61) per person per day. Taxi drivers will expect you to round up the fare when you ride.

Colombia

With both Caribbean and Pacific coastlines, long sandy beaches, snowcapped mountains, and lush green forests, Colombia has something for everyone. Visitors come to explore the great outdoors or mingle with locals in the vibrant cities — tipping is customary but not compulsory.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Most restaurant bills will have a 10 percent voluntary service charge (“propina voluntaria”), and some upscale eateries may even include a 15 percent service charge. You can add more if you wish to.
  • Hotels – You should tip in local currency around $1 per bag for your bellboy or porter and around $2 per day for the maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tipping your tour guide is customary, but you can choose how much you wish to leave, although somewhere 5-10 percent of the tour cost is pretty standard.
Toucan Costa Rica
Image Credit: FINTAN O’ BRIEN via Pixabay

Costa Rica

With jungle-lined beaches and wildlife such as monkeys, sloths, parrots, and toucans within easy reach, Costa Rica is a paradise for nature lovers from all over the world. A growing tourist industry and a stable political situation mean that tipping is becoming more commonplace but not mandatory. U.S. dollars are widely accepted.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Upscale restaurants will add a 10 percent service charge to the bill, but if the service was excellent, consider leaving more. A standard gratuity is 10-15 percent for waiters and bar staff.
  • Hotels – You should leave the bellboy around $1 per bag, and the maid should receive around $2 per day.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides are invaluable in Costa Rica and can keep you safe and well-informed. Aim to tip around $3-$10 per person a day and the same for the driver.

Cuba

As an island filled with beautiful beaches, captivating culture, unique landscapes, and amazing music, Cuba may not be without its problems, but it is still a popular destination. Wages are low for the islanders, and tipping, although not compulsory, is very much appreciated.

  • Restaurants and Bars – It is usual to leave 10-15 percent of the total bill, but you can leave more if you feel that the service warrants it.
  • Hotels – Leave your bellboy at least $1 in local currency if he carries your bags to your room, and leave the same again for the maid. Gift-giving is also part of the Cuban culture, and it is perfectly acceptable to give a small gift to the maid on the last day of your stay.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should always be prepared to tip your tour guide as they will show you the very best parts of the island and usually stay with you all day. Leave around $2-$5 in local currency, per passenger.

Dominica

Dominica offers an unspoiled island habitat that offers lush green forest and mile upon mile of white sandy beaches. The island has suffered at the hands of hurricanes in recent years, but local communities are committed to rebuilding their beautiful island. Tipping is commonplace in tourist areas.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Service is usually included in your bill, but if it doesn’t, simply add the 10 percent on top instead. You should tip your bartender on every round, and hand extra to the waiter if you want to.
  • Hotels – You should tip the bellboy around $1 per bag and the maid $1-2 per night in local currency.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Organized tours may already have a service charge included in the price. If not, aim to offer the tour guide and driver around 10 percent of the total cost.

Dominican Republic

Just 2 hours south of Miami, the Dominican Republic is an island paradise full of beautiful beaches, lively tourist resorts, and friendly locals. The islands have suffered at the hands of hurricanes in recent years, but communities are slowly being rebuilt to welcome visitors once again.

  • Restaurants and Bars – It is customary to leave 10 percent as a tip, so if the restaurant hasn’t added this to the bill, you should add it yourself.
  • Hotels – Tipping is not expected in all-inclusive resorts, but if the service is exceptional, you can leave $1-$2 in local currency for the bellboy, the doorman, and the maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You can easily pick up a private tour on the island or out at sea. You should be prepared to leave as much as $25 per day and give the driver (if you have one) $10 in local currency.

Ecuador

Ecuador is a wonderfully undiscovered nation that is home to the most extraordinary wildlife, breathtaking scenery, and captivating culture. Often under the radar, adventurers often choose other South American destinations, meaning the country remains authentic. Tipping is appreciated but not expected. The U.S. dollar is legal tender in Ecuador.

  • Restaurants and Bars – In upscale restaurants, a 12 percent tax and a 10 percent service charge will be included. In smaller establishments, you should offer a tip of 5-10 percent.
  • Hotels – Tips are discretionary, and you can leave small bills for your bellboy, maid, and valet if you are happy with the service.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Guides do not get paid very much, so be generous if you can. For a group tour, a gratuity of about $5 per person per day and about $2-$3 for the driver is appropriate.
Apaneca, El Salvador
Image Credit: Hugo Brizard via Shutterstock

El Salvador

A country of archaeological sites, volcanic lakes, lush forests, and beautiful beaches, El Salvador, is another often overlooked South American country that is very much worthy of a visit. Tipping here is the norm in the more popular tourist destinations. The U.S. dollar is the official currency of El Salvador.

  • Restaurants and Bars – A 10 percent tip is usually automatically added to most restaurant checks, but if it isn’t, you should add the same amount yourselves.
  • Hotels – Tips are discretionary for hotel staff, but consider leaving around $1 for the bellboy, maid, and valet if you are happy with the service.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Many tour guides in the region work on tips alone. You should, therefore, consider paying as much as $5 per hour, at least.

Grenada

The island of Grenada is famous for its spectacular beaches, picture-perfect coves and waterways, and excellent water sports facilities. As one of the quieter islands in the Caribbean, tipping is not compulsory, but it is pretty standard.

  • Restaurants and Bars – A 10 percent service charge is often already included in your bill, but if not, you should add the same amount yourself.
  • Hotels – Tips are discretionary for hotel staff but consider leaving the local equivalent of around $1 for the bellboy and $2-3 a night for your maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – If you are going on a boat trip, sailing charter, or any other kind of tour, you should be prepared to tip around 10 percent of the total fare.

Guatemala

While some regions of the country are undoubtedly safer than others, there are plenty of natural wonders, quaint villages, and stunning scenery to enjoy in Guatemala. Tipping, or rather rewarding good service, is becoming more commonplace.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Your restaurant bill is highly unlikely to include a service charge, so you should always aim to add 10 percent of the bill as your gratuity.
  • Hotels – Bellhops and maids in upscale hotels may expect a small tip, but most hotel staff won’t be waiting for you to tip them. If you do, $1 in local currency is a great place to start.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should give local guides $2-$3 for small tours or $5-$10 per person for the guide and half that for the driver (all in local currency). If you are planning on taking pictures of the locals, you should offer them a small donation, too.

Guyana

With dense forests and a commitment to ecotourism, Guyana is coming out of the shadow of its troubled past and starting to become one of the continent’s best-kept secrets. Tipping is widely practiced but not expected in Guyana, and while you can use U.S. dollars in Georgetown, always use Guyanese dollars everywhere else.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If your restaurant has not already included a service charge of up to 10 percent, then they do not expect to receive a tip. You can round up your bill or leave loose change if you want to.
  • Hotels – Hotel staff do not expect to receive a tip, but again, you can leave loose change or small bills if you want to.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You will not be expected to leave a tip for your tour guide, but you can leave whatever you like if you feel the service was exceptional.

Haiti

Haiti has a long history of troubled times, both at the hands of mother nature and its own political hierarchy. There are still historical ruins to be explored, beautiful beaches, and welcoming locals to drink and dance with. Tipping is not customary across the island but is appreciated.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Upscale restaurants and those designed for tourists will expect around 10 percent of the bill. You may round up the bill in smaller establishments. You can tip your bartender at the end of the night if you wish to.
  • Hotels – Look to tip local currency — $1 per bag to the bellboy and around $1-2 a night to the maid for cleaning the room.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You can choose to tip your tour guide and driver if you wish to, but it is not expected.
Honduras
Image Credit: Hans Schwarzkopf via Pixabay

Honduras

Home to some of the most bio-diverse reef systems in the world, Honduras and the Bay Islands are popular with visitors looking to snorkel and dive, as well as those who want to explore the Mayan ruins. Tipping is not necessarily expected in Honduras, but it is fairly commonplace in tourist resorts. U.S. dollars are accepted by most businesses, in addition to local currency.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Upscale bars and eateries will usually include the 10 percent service charge on your bill; lower-end establishments will not, but rounding up the bill is a nice gesture.
  • Hotels – Tipping the bellboy and the maid around $1 is a nice touch, or you could leave your loose change and small bills for the housekeeping staff when you leave.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Local guides will be eager to please, so you could leave them a few dollars for a tip, but for full-day tours with drivers expect to leave up to $10 per person for the guide and the same again for the driver.

Jamaica

Beautiful beaches, majestic waterfalls, live reggae music, carnivals, and upscale all-inclusive resorts are just a few of the reasons why tourists love to visit Jamaica all year round. This most popular of all of the Caribbean islands has a booming tourist trade, but even so, tipping is not yet commonplace outside of areas favored by visitors.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If there is no service charge on your bill, consider tipping 15-20 percent in upscale eateries and up to 15 percent elsewhere.
  • Hotels – Be discreet about tipping hotel staff as some establishments operate strict policies about staff taking money or gifts from guests. If you do, $1-$2 in local currency should be fine for the bellboy and the maid service.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides, drivers, and tourist buses will expect a tip in Jamaica. Aim for around 10-20 percent of the total cost of the trip cost or $5-$10 in local currency to the guide per passenger.

Mexico

Mexico has the second-largest economy in Latin America and is home to cosmopolitan cities, ancient civilizations, great food, lively people, and some of the very best beaches in the world. The rise of tourism in Mexico, as well as the country’s proximity to the U.S., makes tipping commonplace in most parts of the country. U.S. dollars may be accepted in tourist areas and border towns.

  • Restaurants and Bars – A tip of 10-20 percent for good or exceptional service is expected across the country, although some establishments will add a “propina” (service charge) to your bill. If you do leave a tip, it should be in pesos, not dollars.
  • Hotels – Bellboys and porters should receive around $0.50-$1 per bag. Maids should expect to receive $1-$2.50 per night, and if your concierge is helpful, tip them up to $8, too (all in local currency).
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Your tour driver and guide will expect a tip. For full tours, expect to leave around $3 per day per person in local currency.

Nicaragua

With stunning landscapes and as many as 19 active volcanoes in the country, Nicaragua offers some of the best hiking on the continent. The country is considered fairly safe and the small but growing tourism trade means that tipping is becoming more commonplace. Though a local currency is used, most businesses also accept U.S. dollars.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Most restaurants will expect to receive a 10 percent tip, while some diners will leave an extra 5-10 percent for exceptional service. Your bartender should also be tipped when you buy your drinks.
  • Hotels – You should expect to tip the bellboy ~$0.75 per bag (in local currency) and the housekeeper the same daily.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should keep enough cash on you to tip the tour guide 5-10 percent of the cost of the tour and the driver about half of that.

Panama

This tropical paradise is home to some of the most diverse and exotic species of animals and plants of the planet. The famous Panama Canal is visually stunning and Panama City is cultured and cosmopolitan. Tipping is pretty customary across the country. U.S. dollars are legal tender in Panama, though local coins under $1 are also in circulation.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Most restaurants do not include a gratuity, but it is customary to tip around 10 percent of the final bill. It is customary to only tip for good service.
  • Hotels – Most hotels already include a 10 percent service charge in the final bill, but you may want to tip the bellboy an extra $1 per bag and the maid a little more.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – It is usual to tip the tour guide an additional $10 per day and the driver half of that if there is one.
Paraguay
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Paraguay

Paraguay is home to some spectacular national parks and some of the most significant Atlantic forests that have not yet been destroyed by deforestation. Visitors come to experience rustic farm life, extensive wildlife sanctuaries, colorful towns, and unforgettable adventures. Tipping has become more prevalent as tourism increases across the country.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If the service charge is not included on the bill, you should add 10 percent on top. Restaurants are the only places where tips are expected in Paraguay.
  • Hotels – You should aim to tip the bellboy around $1 a bag (in local currency) and the same again for the maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You are not expected to tip the tour guide or the driver, but you can do so if you want to.

Peru

A country with a vast history dating back as far as the Inca civilization, Peru is home to a wealth of fascinating archaeological sites, world-class museums, and a wealth of different cultures. Visitors come from all over the world to step back in time, and as the tourist industry grows, tipping has become more commonplace.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Most bars and restaurants will already include a 10 percent service charge. If you do not see one on the bill, you should add your own.
  • Hotels – You should be ready to tip the bellboys around $1 per bag (in local currency) and the same again for your maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You are not expected to tip the tour guide or the driver, but you may want to leave a cash gratuity at the end of the tour.

Puerto Rico

With a rich and fascinating cultural heritage, as well as beautiful beaches and lush green forests, Puerto Rico is just a short plane ride from Miami. It is also now mostly recovered from the damage caused by Hurricane Maria, with most tourist hot spots well and truly open for business. Tipping here is similar to the U.S. and is very much expected. The U.S. dollar is the official currency.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Most restaurants will expect you to tip at least 15 percent of the total bill and bartenders should receive $1 per drink.
  • Hotels – You should be ready to tip the bellboys around $1-$2 per bag and the same again for your maid or anyone else who helps you during your stay.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers will be looking for 15 percent of the fare, and you should add at least $10 per day for tour guides and their drivers.

St. Kitts and Nevis

These twin islands in the southern Caribbean offer a wealth of breathtaking scenery, picture-perfect beaches, and an array of luxury hotels and vacation resorts. Visitors are drawn to the islands to relax and enjoy the good life, and tipping is very much part of the culture. Many businesses will accept U.S. dollars and give change in local currency.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Most restaurants will add a service charge that equals 10-15 percent of the total. You can add extra if you want to, or work out the percentage yourself if it is not on the bill. You should also add a small extra for every drink you buy at the bar.
  • Hotels – Many hotel staff rely on tips to make a living, so be sure to leave the porters and bellboys an extra $1 per bag, and your housekeepers should receive as much as $3 per night.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers, who are often also tour guides, should be tipped 10-15 percent of the final fare.

St. Lucia

St. Lucia is more mountainous than most of the other Caribbean islands, and it has a rich history as a military fortress. It is also a volcanic island, with beautiful sandy beaches, luxury hotels, and a thriving tourist industry. Because of this, tipping is commonplace on St. Lucia.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Many restaurants will add the 10 percent service charge to the bill, but if not, you should go ahead and tip 10-15 percent yourself. You should also aim to tip your bartender a further 10 percent of the bill.
  • Hotels – Hotels in St. Lucia are pretty upscale. You should, therefore, aim to tip around $1 in local currency to the porter per bag and same again to the maid per night.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should aim to tip taxi drivers and tour guides around 10 percent of the final fare or cost of the tour, to be handed over at the end.
St. Vincent and the Grenadines
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St. Vincent and the Grenadines

This chain of islands in the Caribbean Sea offers a real taste of paradise with white sandy beaches, clear blue waters, and a noticeable lack of tourists compared to some of the bigger islands.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Many restaurants will add the 10 percent service charge to the bill, but if you do not see it on there, you should tip 10-15 percent.
  • Hotels – You should aim to tip the bellboy or porter around $1 in local currency and the same again to the maid, per night.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers and tour guides will expect at least 10 percent of the fare as a tip at the end of your journey.

Suriname

As the smallest country in South America, and one of the world’s poorest countries, not many adventurers get to visit this lush green Atlantic outpost. Covered in swathes of rainforest and with a vibrant Dutch-colonial capital, tipping is not common here as it isn’t part of the culture.

  • Restaurants and Bars – These are the only places that you would really be expected to tip and even then, only when the 10 percent service charge is already included in the bill.
  • Hotels – You should keep loose change to tip the bellboy, porter, and maid if you want to.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers and tour guides will not expect a tip, but will gratefully receive any you choose to give them.

The Bahamas

The tropical islands of the Bahamas offer crystal blue waters, white sandy beaches, and perfect year-round weather — just a few of the reasons why visitors head there in droves. There are over 700 islands to choose from, but the largest and most popular islands are major tourist hotspots, meaning that tipping is very much a way of life here. Local currency is pegged 1:1 to the U.S. dollar which is widely accepted.

  • Restaurants and Bars – A service charge of 15 percent is usually added to the bill, and in the rare occasion that it isn’t, you should leave a gratuity of at least 15 percent. In a bar, you should tip waitstaff tip 10-15 percent, and add a further $1 per round of drinks for the bartender.
  • Hotels – You should tip the porters and bellboys at least $1 for each bag they carry, and maids should receive a tip of $2 for each day. You should also leave behind your remaining currency on the day of your departure.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Your tour guide and driver should receive 5-10 percent of the total cost of the tour, but this is at your discretion.

Trinidad and Tobago

The beating heart of the Caribbean, both of these islands offer warm waters, long sandy beaches, and first-class resorts, combined with one of the warmest welcomes in the world. Tipping is not part of the culture in either Trinidad or Tobago, but the ever-increasing tourist trade is making it much more commonplace.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Restaurants often add a service charge to the bill of 10-15 percent. If this is not the case, you can add it yourself. You should tip the bartender $1 or so for each round of drinks.
  • Hotels – You should tip the porter, bellboy, and even the maid, either in U.S. dollars or Trinidad and Tobago dollars. $1 per bag and a little more for the maid is perfect.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Your tour guide and driver should receive 5-10 percent of the total cost of the tour, but this is at your discretion.

Uruguay

Sandwiched between Argentina and Brazil, the country of Uruguay is a hidden charm that offers delicious food, stunning beaches, unique scenery, and tons of colonial charm. Easy to reach from the U.S., it is becoming more popular with adventurers looking to move away from the more traditional tourist routes. Tipping is pretty much commonplace throughout the country.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Some restaurants will add a service charge of 10 percent. If you don’t see this on the bill, you should add it yourself.
  • Hotels – You should tip the bellboy the equivalent of $0.50 in local currency and about the same for the maid every night.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides and drivers should receive a daily tip of around 5-10 percent of the tour price. Taxi drivers will not expect a tip, but you could round up the fare.

United States of America

Tipping is commonplace in the U.S. and very much a social expectation. Service wages can be low, and many workers make up their pay in tips.

  • Restaurants and Bars – 15-20 percent is normal for sit-down restaurants and slightly less for buffets. This should be applied to your pre-tax bill rather than the whole amount. For bartenders, $1-$2 dollars per drink is an acceptable tip.
  • Hotels – For bellboys, $1-$2 is just right and $2-$5 dollars for the maid per day is an acceptable tip.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides and drivers should receive a tip of around 10-20 percent of the tour price. Taxi drivers can expect a tip of around 15 percent or maybe more.
Morrocoy National Park, Venezuela
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Venezuela

This South American republic may have a reputation for civil unrest and high crime rates, but in more stable times, it has become a hotspot for beach lovers from all over the world. Tourism figures have been declining in recent years, and tipping is never mandatory, but certainly desired.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If you receive good service, let them know by leaving around 10 percent of the bill for your waiter, and hand it to them in cash.
  • Hotels – You should leave the doorman or porter at least $1 per bag, and leave the maid $2 every day (both in local currency).
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – On a paid tour, it is proper etiquette to tip your guide around 10-20 percent of the price of the tour.

Tipping Etiquette & Guide for Asia-Pacific

Afghanistan

This ancient nation has become increasingly inaccessible and potentially dangerous to Westerners. In more favorable times, it is a fascinating country full of Central Asian charm.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You should tip the standard 10 percent in restaurants, and as this is a Muslim country, bars are few and far between.
  • Hotels – You should provide your bellboys, porters, and maids with small change.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should tip your guide generously as it can be dangerous to take tourists away from the main cities in Afghanistan.
Sydney Opera House
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Australia

This vast landmass is home to vibrant cities, beautiful beaches, scorched earth deserts, and so much more. In Australia, it is generally believed that staff in the service industry are paid well and therefore tipping is not standard practice.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You will not usually see a service charge on the bill, but you can add a cash tip for excellent service. This applies to both bars and restaurants. Rounding up is a good practice or add 10 percent for great service.
  • Hotels – Porters and bag carriers will not expect to receive a tip, but you can hand them $1-$2 in local currency if you want to, or leave the same for your maids.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – If you feel that your tour guide did an excellent job, feel free to tip him or her a few dollars at the end.

Bangladesh

Home to enormous mangrove forests, the royal Bengal tiger, and a winding maze of waterways, Bangladesh is a South Asian country that is largely untouched by mass tourism. Tipping in Bangladesh is known as baksheesh, and it used as a way to show appreciation for good service.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Many restaurants have a service charge included in bills, but for those that don’t, you should add 5-10 percent of the total. Alcohol is restricted in Bangladesh, but you can find it in Western hotels.
  • Hotels – You should leave about 20-30 taka (~$0.24-$0.35) for the bellboy and the same again for the maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tipping tour guides is not customary, but you could leave your guide and driver 30-50 taka (~$0.35-$0.60) per day, per person. You could also tip your driver 50 taka (~$0.60).

Bhutan

This Buddhist kingdom on the eastern edge of the Himalayas is famous for its monasteries, fortresses, and dramatic landscapes. A popular trekking destination, tipping is not compulsory in Bhutan but has come to be expected from Westerners.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You will usually find a service charge of around 20 percent already added to your bill, so you don’t need to add any more unless you want to.
  • Hotels – You should tip the porter and the maid the equivalent of $1-$2 per bag or per day in local currency.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Guided tours are commonplace here and should be tipped in local currency. You should tip the tour guide $10 for the guide and around half of that for the driver. There may also be cooks or horsemen to tip, too, and you should consider around $5 per day.

Brunei

Brunei is a tiny nation on the island of Borneo, famous for its beautiful beaches and diverse rainforests. Tipping is not standard practice in Brunei.

  • Restaurants and Bars – A 10 percent service charge is normally included in your hotel bill, so further tipping is not usually necessary.
  • Hotels – For bellboys, valets, porters, and maids, leaving up to $4 in local currency is acceptable.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers expect you to round up the bill, and tour guides and drivers will accept tips, but how much you leave is up to you.

Cambodia

Cambodia is most famous for the beautiful Angkor Wat, but it is also home to stunning beaches, forests, and rivers.  Tipping is not part of the culture here, but due to low wages, it is very appreciated. U.S. dollars are widely used and change may be given in local currency.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Tipping is not expected, but for good service, you could leave between 5-10 percent.
  • Hotels – For bellboys, you’ll want to give $1 per bag and the maid $1 per day that you stay.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides will expect a tip of around 10% of the tour price and drivers about $2 per day.

China

China is a land of ancient treasures, World Heritage sites, extreme landscapes, and friendly people. Tipping is not part of Chinese culture.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Some restaurants will refuse to accept tips. Others will already add 10-15 percent of your bill as a service charge. In other establishments, tipping is not expected.
  • Hotels – Tipping is not expected in hotels, but in very fancy ones, you may want to leave around $10 in local currency for the concierge.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers do not expect a tip, but tour guides do. You should, therefore, consider around $10 per day in local currency.
Fiji
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Fiji

This archipelago in the South Pacific is famous for its rugged landscapes, palm-lined beaches, and coral reefs. Tipping is not expected or required in Fiji because it’s a communal society.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You are never obligated to tip your servers, but if you choose to, you should give the money directly to them.
  • Hotels – You are not expected to tip hotel staff, but again, you can hand them small amounts in local currency if you want to.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers are grateful if you round up the bill, and tour guides and drivers will not expect a gratuity, but you can add an additional 10-20 percent if you want to.

Hong Kong SAR, China

This vibrant island is a land of bright lights and dizzying culture, as well as being one of the most important financial hubs in the world.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Restaurants in Hong Kong will often add a 10 percent service charge to the bill and may refuse a tip if you try to leave one.
  • Hotels – You can try to leave a few extra dollars in local currency for bellboys and porters, but they might not take it.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers are grateful if you round up the bill, and tour guides and drivers will not expect a gratuity, but you can add 10-20 percent if you want to.

India

India is a vast country known for its bustling cities, beautiful countryside, vibrant colors, and wonderful people. Tipping (known as baksheesh in India) is pretty uncommon and is usually only accepted in restaurants.

  • Restaurants and Bars – In larger restaurants, a service charge of around 10 percent is usually included. If it is not, you can work this out yourself. It may be best to hand the tip directly to the waiter.
  • Hotels – You should offer the bellboy around $0.50 per bag in local currency, and you should leave a similar amount per day for housekeeping.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should round up the fare with taxi or rickshaw drivers. For organized tours, you should tip your guide around $1-$4 per day in local currency.

Indonesia

This Southeast Asian nation, made up of thousands of tiny volcanic islands, is famous for its beautiful beaches, active volcanoes, and mile upon mile of jungle. Tipping is commonplace across Indonesia.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If there is a service charge of 5-10 percent added to your bill, you do not have to add more. But if you do not see it, you should personally tip the waitstaff at least 10 percent of the total bill.
  • Hotels – Hotels charge a 21 percent tax, of which 11 percent is a service charge. This means that you do not need to tip the staff, but you can leave them a few rupees here and there if you want to.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You are not obligated to tip your tour guide or driver, but you should leave some extra money at the end of the tour if you want to. Taxi drivers will not expect to receive a tip either, but rounding up the fare is common practice.

Japan

Japan is a South Pacific island nation that seamlessly fuses ancient culture and modern-day life, and is one of the most fascinating and eclectic places in the world to visit. Tipping is not customary in Japan, and in some instances, can even be considered rude.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Tipping is tricky. You are not expected to tip, and service is included in the bill already. The same applies to bars.
  • Hotels – Hotel staff are trained to refuse tips politely. The only exception to this rule is in some upscale hotels where you should place a small tip in local currency in an envelope and hand it to the staff directly.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You are not obligated to tip your tour guide or driver or even your taxi driver or chauffeur.
Kazakhstan
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Kazakhstan

This former Soviet state is now making a name for itself with its emerging cultural and nightlife scene, as well as excellent shopping, dining, and other popular attractions. Tipping is not customary in Kazakhstan.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Your service charge will be included in your bill. If you want to, you can give a little more directly to the waitstaff.
  • Hotels – Your hotel bill will also usually include a service charge, so again, only tip small amounts in local cash directly to staff if you want to.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Public transport has fixed fares, so drivers won’t expect a tip, but you can leave one if you wish to. The same applies to tour guides.

Kiribati

Situated in the equatorial Pacific, Kiribati offers world-class fishing and beautiful beaches, and the islands are an undiscovered tropical paradise. Tipping is not commonplace across the islands.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Most restaurants will not include a service charge, and you should leave a tip if you are happy with the service.
  • Hotels – You should tip the hotel staff with small denomination local currency if you want to receive excellent service.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides and drivers also appreciate a tip at the end of the tour.

Kyrgyzstan

This Central Asian nation is made up of rugged terrain and is home to snow leopards, lynx, and lots and lots of sheep. Tipping is not commonplace in Kyrgyzstan.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Some larger restaurants will include a service charge of around 10 percent, if not, only leave a tip if you are happy with the service.
  • Hotels – You can tip the hotel staff with some local currency to the equivalent of $1 or so if you receive excellent service.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides and drivers also appreciate a tip at the end of the tour, but it is not required.

Lao PDR

Lao PDR is famous for the Mekong River, stunning mountain terrain, French colonial architecture, and Buddhist monasteries. Tipping is not customary in Lao PDR.

  • Restaurants and Bars – In restaurants frequented by tourists, up to 10 percent of the bill can be added as a service charge. If you do not see it on the bill, round up the 10 percent yourself if you want to.
  • Hotels – You should tip the bellboy, porter, and the maid using local currency. This can be the equivalent of $1-$2.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides and drivers also appreciate a tip at the end of the tour. You should consider leaving 5-10 percent of the total cost of the tour.

Macao SAR, China

Macau is a heady mix of cultural influences, and with its giant casinos and malls, it has come to be known as the “Las Vegas of Asia.” Tipping is not yet commonplace across Macao.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Restaurants will include a service charge of around 10 percent in your bill or you could leave 10 percent if it is not included.
  • Hotels – You can tip the hotel staff with small denomination local currency if you receive good service.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides and drivers also appreciate a tip at the end of the tour. You should consider leaving 5-10 percent of the total cost of the tour.
Kuala Lumpur
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Malaysia

This stunning peninsula is known for its beautiful beaches, dense rainforests, and eclectic mix of cultures. Despite being known as a popular tourist destination, tipping is not commonplace in Malaysia.

  • Restaurants and Bars – A 10 percent service charge is pretty standard in Malay restaurants and bars. If it is not included, you should consider leaving the same.
  • Hotels – Maids, bellboys, porters, and other staff would all appreciate tips in the local currency, but it is discretionary.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – If you go on an organized tour, you should consider leaving around 10 percent of the total cost as a tip when the tour has ended and half that for the driver.

Maldives

Year-round great weather, romantic resorts, stunning beaches, and clear blue water make the Maldives an attractive prospect. Tipping here is not expected but always appreciated. The U.S. dollar is accepted as legal tender in the Maldives.

  • Restaurants and Bars – A 10 percent service charge is pretty standard in restaurants and bars here, so a tip is not usually necessary.
  • Hotels – Maids can expect a tip of around $2 per day. Depending on your accommodation, you may have the same waiter for the duration of your stay in an all-inclusive resort. You could tip around $10-$20 for exceptional service.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You can tip your boat staff between $5-$10 and your dive instructor the price of a tank hire.

Marshall Islands

This chain volcanic islands and coral atolls in the central Pacific Ocean include the world-famous Bikini Atoll, now a popular dive site, and home to some of the most amazing marine life in the world. Tipping is not customary across the Marshall Islands, where the U.S. dollar is the national currency.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Service charges are not standard even in larger restaurants, but you can leave a tip if you want to.
  • Hotels – Maids, bellboys, porters and other staff would all appreciate tips in the local currency. Feel free to leave a tip at your discretion, though.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – If you go on an organized tour, you could consider leaving a cash tip (10 percent of the tour price) at the end of the tour for your guide.

Mongolia

Famed for its nomadic culture, ancient Mongol empire, natural beauty, and incredibly friendly people, Mongolia is a huge country that is very much on the map for adventurous explorers. Tipping isn’t common and rarely expected, but is becoming more prevalent in tourist areas.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If you are in a restaurant that caters to Westerners, you should consider leaving 5-10 percent as a tip.
  • Hotels – Western-oriented hotels will expect you to tip the bellboy around 2000 tugrik (~$0.73) and the maid 1000 tugrik ($0.36) a night.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – If you take an organized tour, you should expect to tip the guide 5-10 percent of the cost of the tour and the driver an additional 2-5 percent.

Myanmar

Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, is home to over 100 different ethnic groups, making it rich in culture, history, and modern-day tourist attractions. Tipping is not yet customary, but with low wages, tips and gratuities are very much appreciated. U.S. dollars may be accepted in tourist areas.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You are not expected to tip in a restaurant, but if you feel that the service was excellent, 10 percent of the bill is the recommended guideline.
  • Hotels – Tipping only really takes place in high-end hotels where you can tip the staff $1-$2 if you feel the service warrants it.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Guides can expect to receive around $10 per day for their services, and you should consider paying the driver as much as half again.

Nauru

This tiny island lies northeast of Australia and offers glorious coral reefs, white sandy beaches, and inland lagoons. Tipping is not common in Nauru.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You are not expected to tip in restaurants, and there aren’t many on the island to choose from.
  • Hotels – Again, there aren’t many places to stay on the island, and you won’t be expected to tip.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Your tour guide or driver may be grateful to receive a small tip in local cash at the end of the tour.
Nepal and Everest
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Nepal

Most commonly known as home to Mt. Everest, Kathmandu, and Buddhist temples with resident monkeys, Nepal is a challenging country but one that is popular with those looking to really see the world. Tipping is commonplace in Nepal.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Large restaurants will include a service charge in the final bill, but at smaller ones, you should leave the standard 10 percent as a tip.
  • Hotels – For your bellboy or porter, a tip of 20 rupees (~$0.18) should be sufficient.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Guides and drivers are necessary for many parts of Nepal, especially in the Himalayas. They risk adverse weather conditions and extreme conditions regularly, so tip them fairly — at least $10 per day (in local currency) for guides and half that for porters.

New Caledonia

Comprised of dozens of islands in the South Pacific, the French territory is popular with scuba divers due to a massive barrier reef that is rich in native marine life. Tipping is generally not expected in New Caledonia.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Taxes and service charges are usually included in New Caledonia. You can round up the bill if you wish.
  • Hotels – You can tip the hotel staff small amounts of local currency if you wish to. Around a dollar would be acceptable.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Guides and drivers will welcome small tips in local currency. As it is not part of the culture you can give as much or as little as you like.

New Zealand

The 2 islands of New Zealand are famous for their volcanoes and dramatic scenery, as well as being home to vibrant cities and welcoming residents. Often referred to as Australia’s friendlier neighbor, tipping is not customary or expected in New Zealand.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You waiter will not expect a tip, and service charges aren’t usually included. If you wish to, you can leave spare change for your server or bartender.
  • Hotels – There is no need to tip your bellboy, maid, or porter, as workers in the service industry in New Zealand are deemed to receive a fair wage.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You may round up your taxi fare if you wish to, but tour guides and drivers won’t expect anything more than loose change.

Pakistan

Pakistan is the sixth-most populous country in the world and a huge country full of dramatic landscapes, vibrant cities, and stunning scenery.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Most upscale restaurants add a 10 percent service charge to the bill, and you should add extra rupees to the bill in smaller eateries.
  • Hotels – A government room tax of up to 17.5 percent is usually added to the bill in larger establishments, and you can tip your maid, porter or bellboy around 30-40 rupees (~$0.20-$0.26) for their services
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tip your tour guide $2 per day (in local currency) for individual tours and half that for a group tour.

Palau

Palau is an archipelago of over 500 islands located in the western Pacific Ocean. The islands are a popular destination for scuba divers. Tipping is not expected, but very much appreciated. The official currency is the U.S. dollar.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You should tip your server if you have received good service, and no service charge is included in the bill.
  • Hotels – You can leave loose change for the maids, or hand your porter or bellboy a small amount for every bag they help you with.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – At the end of the tour, you should leave some money for your tour guide, driver, or boatsman. $5-$10 per dive or activity is a good starting point.
Papua New Guinea
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Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea is known for volcanic interiors, beautiful beaches, and lush tropical rainforests. The island nation is a destination for those who want to stray from the beaten path. There is no tipping culture in Papua New Guinea.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If you wish to, you can leave small denomination local currency for your server.
  • Hotels – The same applies to hotel staff — tip if you wish.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides may appreciate a cash tip at the end of the tour, and be careful taking pictures of local residents as some may want a monetary gift in return.

Philippines

The Philippines are always beautiful but sometimes complicated, with ongoing clashes between the military and insurgent groups in some parts of the country. Modern cities and beautiful beaches, though, are still a draw for travelers. Tipping is not customary but is becoming increasingly popular. U.S. dollars may be accepted in tourist areas, otherwise use local currency.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If there is a service charge added to the bill, you do not have to tip. If you cannot see it on the bill, you should give around 10 percent of the total of the bill to your waitstaff directly.
  • Hotels – High-end hotels may expect their bellboys, bar staff, porters, and maids to receive a tip, but otherwise, you will not be expected to leave one.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides in the Philippines are often on extremely low wages, so tip generously if you can. 10 percent or more of the total bill is a great place to start.

Samoa

This group of Polynesian islands has coral reefs, sandy beaches, and rainforests galore, and some of the islands are still completely uninhabited. Tipping is not part of Samoan culture, but many workers are severely underpaid.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Tipping is not expected at Samoan restaurants, but you can leave a tip in the hand of your servers if you think the service was good enough.
  • Hotels – It is not customary to tip the hotel staff, but some tourists do leave small tips for bellboys, porters, and maids of about $1 or so in local currency.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tips are gratefully received by tour guides and drivers, so you should add 5-10 percent of the cost of the tour.

Singapore

Singapore is a vibrant, multi-cultural island city-state with a rich colonial history and an important financial center. Tipping is not customary in Singapore, but Western tourists are often expected to tip anyway.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Most upscale restaurants will add a service charge of at least 10 percent to the bill but may expect tourists to tip more. Conversely, tipping is not expected at hawker food stalls.
  • Hotels – It is only really the bellboys that receive tips in Singapore. $1 or $2 per bag in local currency is about right.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You do not need to tip your tour guide. Taxi drivers also won’t expect a tip, but you can round up the fare if you wish.

Solomon Islands

The Solomon Islands in the South Pacific is famous for its U.S. War Memorial that honors fallen allied soldiers. There is no tipping on the Solomon Islands, and visitors should honor this tradition.

South Korea
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South Korea

South Korea is a land of beautiful countryside, Buddhist temples, and fast-paced, high-tech cities like the capital, Seoul. Tipping in South Korea isn’t customary, and some establishments will even refuse it.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Add a 5-10 percent tip in Western-style restaurants, but do not include a tip in Korean establishments.
  • Hotels – Tipping isn’t common in hotels, but you can give loose change to the bellboy, or leave some for the maid if you want to.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides in South Korea won’t expect a tip and won’t be offended if you choose not to leave one. Many Western visitors do, however, tip 5-10 percent of the cost.

Sri Lanka

This beautiful and bold island nation in the Indian Ocean is home to ancient ruins of monasteries, arid interiors, and beautiful beaches. Tipping is very much expected in Sri Lanka.

  • Restaurants and Bars – It is customary to leave 10 percent of the bill in a restaurant, and you should hand it directly to the server.
  • Hotels – You should tip the porter and bellboy around 50-100 Sri Lankan rupees (~$0.28-$0.55) per bag, and the same again for the housekeeper. Some hotels will have a tip jar, too, where you can leave larger amounts at the end of your stay.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Many organized tours will already have a service charge included. If you don’t see one, leave around 10 percent per day for your tour guide. Local tours and unauthorized guides should only receive a small cash tip at the end.

Taiwan

Taiwan is home to modern cities, traditional temples, and stunning scenery. Despite the rise of Western tourism in the country, tipping is not customary in Taiwan.

  • Restaurants and Bars – There will usually be a service charge of 10-15 percent added to your bill. You are not expected to tip any more on top of that. You can leave 10 percent if there is no service charge included.
  • Hotels – You are not expected to tip in hotels, but it’s a nice gesture to tip around $1 in local currency to the bellboy and the same again for the maids.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should tip your tour guide at least 10 percent of the cost of the tour and around 5 percent for the driver. Taxi drivers do not expect a tip, but you can tell them to keep the change.

Tajikistan

Tajikistan is known for its mountainous interior, and the country is a popular destination for those who enjoy extreme hiking and climbing. Tipping is not expected in Tajikistan.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Upscale bars and restaurants in bigger towns and cities will often add a 10 percent service charge to the bill. Other than that, there is no need to tip.
  • Hotels – Tipping is not expected during your stay here.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Your taxi driver and tour guide will not expect to receive a tip.

Thailand

Famous for its tropical beaches, vibrant party scene, and ultra-modern cities, Thailand is one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations. Despite the huge numbers of travelers that arrive here every year, tipping is still not customary in Thailand.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Leave your loose change in mid-range restaurants, and calculate 10 percent of the bill for more upscale establishments. If there is a service charge on the bill, you do not have to worry about tipping any extra.
  • Hotels – Tip the bellboy or porter around ~$1.50 per bag in local currency and the same again in an envelope for your maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Round up the fare for taxi drivers and add $10-$20 per day in local currency for the tour guide.
Timor-Leste
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Timor-Leste

This Southeast Asian island nation is best known for its coral lined beaches and vibrant marine life. Following decades of brutal struggle to achieve independence, it is now still largely undiscovered and tourist-free. Tipping is not customary in Timor-Leste. The official currency is the U.S. dollar.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Tipping is not mandatory here, and restaurants do not have a service charge added to them. If you feel like tipping, you can tip 10 percent as a guide.
  • Hotels – You can tip loose change, but it is not expected.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Round up the fare for taxi drivers and add a small tip for your tour guide if you feel they deserve one.

Tonga

This Polynesian kingdom comprises more than 170 islands lined with white sandy beaches, coral reefs, and interiors covered with tropical rainforests. Tipping is not part of the culture in Tonga, but it is appreciated.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Restaurants do not have a service charge added to them, but if you want to tip, you should hand the money directly to your servers. The same rules apply to bars.
  • Hotels – You do not have to tip hotel staff, but many guests leave something small for the bellboy and the maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – It is a nice gesture to tip 5-10 percent of the tour price to both the guide and the driver. Taxi drivers only really receive a tip if they help load luggage or go that extra mile.

Turkmenistan

Set on the ancient Asian Silk Road and bordered by the Caspian Sea, this Soviet-style country is an unusual, but rewarding, travel destination. Tipping is not part of the culture in Turkmenistan.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Restaurants do not have a service charge added to them, and tipping is not expected or required in traditional restaurants. Servers in Western-style establishments will appreciate a small tip.
  • Hotels – You do not have to tip hotel staff, but many guests leave something small for the bellboy and the maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – It is a nice gesture to tip 5-10 percent of the tour price to both the guide and the driver. Taxi drivers do not expect to receive a tip.

Tuvalu

These sparsely populated islands are part of the British Commonwealth and are famous for palm-fringed beaches, extensive birdlife, and historical sites from WWII. Tipping in Tuvalu isn’t common and never expected.

  • Restaurants and Bars – There is no service charge, and tipping is not expected. If you frequent an upscale establishment, you can leave a tip if you wish to.
  • Hotels – Only upscale hotels would expect you to leave a small tip for the bellboy, maids, or other hotel staff. Leave what you think they deserve (in local currency).
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers do not expect a tip, and tour guides should only receive one if you want to reward them for their services.

Uzbekistan

Another of the Silk Road nations, Uzbekistan is best known for its ancient Islamic landmarks and architecture, ornate mosques, and the city of Samarkand. Tipping is not compulsory in Uzbekistan.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Because most establishments already add a 10 percent service charge to the bill, additional tips are not required. Bars and clubs are on the rise in Uzbekistan, so feel free to pass a small tip to your bartender in local currency.
  • Hotels – The service charge is always included, but bellboys, porters, and maids may expect a small gratuity.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You can show your appreciation for your guide and driver by leaving them a tip of your choice at the end of the tour.

Vanuatu

Made up of 80 islands, this South Pacific nation attracts adventurers looking to dive the coral reefs and explore the underwater caverns and WWII-era wrecks. Tipping is not encouraged in Vanuatu, and can even be considered an insult in some instances. Local residents believe that if they receive something for nothing, they will be in your debt. Therefore, play it safe and don’t tip in Vanuatu.

Vietnam
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Vietnam

Vietnam is another much loved Asian nation famous for its beautiful beaches, bustling cities, and Buddhist pagodas. Tipping in Vietnam is appreciated but not expected. U.S. dollars may be accepted in shops or hotels in tourist areas, but paying in local currency may be more advantageous.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Most restaurants in Vietnam will add a 5-10 percent service charge to the bill. If you cannot see this on the bill, add about the same yourself, and hand it directly to your server. Bartenders often rely on tips to make a living, so round up your bills or add an extra $1 per round (in local currency).
  • Hotels – Look to leave your bellboy around $1 per bag (in local currency), and your maid or housekeeper a little more. You can also leave a few extra dollars at the reception desk when you leave.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides also rely on tips to supplement their income, so add $3-$5 per day (in local currency) for your guide and the same for your driver.

Tipping Etiquette & Guide for Europe

Albania

The Eastern European nation of Albania is a popular destination for adventurers looking to enjoy the great outdoors. Tipping is commonplace in Albania, but not mandatory.

  • Restaurants and Bars – The usual practice is to leave a tip of around 5-10 percent of the total cost of the meal. Your bartender won’t expect a tip, but you can add an extra 5 percent if you are happy with the service.
  • Hotels – Cleaning staff, bellboys, and porters will appreciate around $1-$2 in local currency as a tip.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – For tour guides, the normal tip amount is 10 percent of the price of the tour and about half that for the driver if there is one. Taxi drivers will not expect a tip, but you can round up the fare.

Andorra

A popular ski resort, Andorra is a tiny, independent principality that has tax-haven status making it equally as popular with duty-free shoppers. Tipping isn’t really customary in Andorra.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Some restaurants will add a 10 percent service charge to the bill, meaning there is no need to leave a tip. If you don’t see a service charge, add the extra 10 percent and give it to your server instead.
  • Hotels – You are not expected to tip your hotel staff in Andorra.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tipping a taxi driver isn’t expected or custom in Andorra, and you should agree upon your fare before you ride.

Armenia

The tiny nation of Armenia is the place to visit if you like tranquil scenery, ancient churches, and warm, welcoming locals. Tipping is starting to become increasingly popular in Armenia.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Restaurants are starting to add around 10 percent of the bill as a service charge, but this may not go to the serving staff. If there is no service charge on the bill, you should aim to tip about 10 percent in restaurants, cafes, and bars.
  • Hotels – Tipping in hotels isn’t expected or custom in Armenian hotels, but you can leave a small amount of local currency with the bellboy or for the maids if you want to.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should round up the fare for your taxi driver, and leaving spare local change for your tour guide or driver is always appreciated, especially in bigger towns and cities.
Hallstatt, Austria
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Austria

Once home to such famous residents as Mozart, Strauss, and Freud, Austria is a land of historic cities, perfect peaks, and stunning scenery. It is popular with visitors looking to ski, hike, and explore the cities. Tipping is common in Austria.

  • Restaurants and Bars – There is often a service charge of around 12.5 percent added to the bill, but you should round up the total on top of this. If there is no service charge, tip around 5-10 percent.
  • Hotels – Hotel bills often already include a service charge, but you can leave small gratuities for personalized service. Leave a couple of euros for your bellboy or porter and the same again for the maid per night.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You can tip your tour guide with ~$11 in local currency at the end of the tour, and you should also leave a tip for the driver.

Azerbaijan

Azerbaijan is a country where Eastern history blends seamlessly with Western culture, and it is a popular destination with those looking for skiing, water sports, and even beach holidays. Tipping is still fairly uncommon in Azerbaijan.

  • Restaurants and Bars – More upscale hotels may add a service charge to the bill, but in regular eateries, there is no need to tip.
  • Hotels – Tipping is not expected in hotels in Azerbaijan.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You are not expected to tip your tour guide or driver. Taxi drivers will expect you to round up the fare.

Belarus

The Republic of Belarus is a fascinating country with a rich cultural heritage and extraordinary landscapes. It is a nation that is still pretty much undiscovered by Western tourists, but it has lots to offer. Tipping is not common in Belarus.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Tipping isn’t expected in Belarus, but if you want to add a gratuity, leave around 5 percent of the bill.
  • Hotels – Tipping is not expected in hotels, but you can leave small change for the bellboy, porter, or maid if you want to.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You are not expected to tip your tour guide or driver, but you can leave them small local currency if you want to.

Belgium

Belgium is a country of medieval cities, seriously scrumptious chocolate, and finely-honed craft beers, among many other things. Tipping isn’t standard practice in Belgium.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You will often find a service charge of 10-15 percent added to your bill in Belgium restaurants. Because of this, there is no need to tip further.
  • Hotels – A service charge will be included in your bill, but feel free to leave a couple of euros for the doorman, bellboy, and maids.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You are not expected to tip your tour guide or taxi driver, but you can leave a few extra euros if you want to.

Bosnia and Herzegovina

This combined nation on the Balkan Peninsula is home to medieval castles, romantic villages, rivers, lakes, and mountains. Still one of the hidden gems of Europe, tipping is common practice in many of the larger towns and cities.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Tipping is expected in restaurants in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and you should always aim to tip 5-10 percent of the bill. The same percentage is also expected when tipping your bartender.
  • Hotels – Hotels will often round up the bill, but carry a little extra local cash to tip the bellboy, porter, and maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Wages here can be quite low, so always tip your tour guide when you can. You should also round up the fare for your taxi driver.
Bulgaria
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Bulgaria

Bulgaria is a Balkan nation with Black Sea beaches, a rich cultural history, and the beautiful capital city of Sofia. As Bulgaria finds its feet on the tourist maps of Europe, tipping is starting to become more commonplace.

  • Restaurants and Bars – It is standard practice to tip 10 percent of the bill. Most waitstaff makes up their salaries in tips, so if the service was excellent, you should tip even more.
  • Hotels – Tipping is expected and very much appreciated in Bulgarian hotels. You should tip the porter, doormen, bellboy, and maids with local currency of around $1 per bag and the same again for each night stayed. Avoid tipping in coins.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – It is customary in Bulgaria for tour guides and drivers to receive a tip of around 10 percent at the end of the tour. Taxi drivers also expect a similar percentage.

Croatia

Croatia is a land of mountains and lakes that run into beautiful beaches on the Dalmatian Coast. Visitors come to ski in the winter and enjoy quieter beach holidays than can be found in the more traditionally Spanish, French, and Portuguese resorts. There is not a huge tipping culture in Croatia.

  • Restaurants and Bars – It is expected that you leave the standard 10 percent on your bill in most restaurants, or round up the bill in bars or smaller establishments.
  • Hotels – Tips are not expected in hotels, but you can show your appreciation by leaving $2-$3 in local currency for the bellboys and maids.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should tip your tour guide around $1.50-$2 per person in local currency, and about half of that for the driver. Taxi drivers do not expect a tip, but it’s a nice gesture to round up the fare.

Cyprus

The island of Cyprus is famed for its beautiful beaches, rugged interior, and ancient ruins of palaces, tombs, and mosaic-tiled villas. Cyprus is a popular winter sun destination, and there are lots of great resorts to choose from. Tipping is optional here.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Most restaurants will charge a 10 percent service charge on the final bill. If you want to leave anything extra, a couple of euros will suffice. You are not expected to leave a tip in bars and cafes, but again, that is up to you.
  • Hotels – Most hotels already include a 10-15 percent service charge in your bill. You can tip your bellboy or maid a few euros extra if you wish.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides and drivers will appreciate a tip of around 10 percent of the cost of the tour. You can round up the fare for taxi drivers.

Czech Republic

Home to historical cities, craft beers, and castles, the Czech Republic has a thriving tourist trade and is popular with visitors from all over the world. Tipping is very much expected here.

  • Restaurants and Bars – A service charge of around 10 percent is usually included in the bill. If it is not, it is good manners to tip your servers 10-15 percent.
  • Hotels – You should tip your bellboy and maid with local currency and also leave the local equivalent of ~$20 for the concierge at the end of your stay.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should tip your tour guide (in local currency) as much as $15-$20 per person per day for small groups and $10 per person per day for larger groups.

Denmark

Denmark is alleged to be the “best place to live in the world” and millions of travelers visit every year to test out that theory. According to Danish law, any service charge or gratuity should be included in the bill, but there are certain instances where you may still need to tip.

  • Restaurants and Bars – A service charge should be included in your bill. If it is not, you should consider leaving around 10 percent of the bill to be given directly to your server.
  • Hotels – You do not need to tip any of the staff at your hotel.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You don’t need to tip your taxi driver, and tour guides would not expect to receive a tip either.
Estonia
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Estonia

Estonia is a land of churches and castle, rugged beaches, and deep blue lagoons. Visitors come to take in the scenery or explore the ancient cities, and tipping is a relatively new tradition that is becoming much more commonplace.

  • Restaurants and Bars – It is usual to tip your servers 5-10 percent of the total bill, but you have to offer this as it is illegal for the establishment to add it to the bill.
  • Hotels – Tipping your hotel staff is not expected or customary.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You can round up your taxi fare if you want to, and offer to leave your tour guide 5-10 percent of the cost of the tour if you think the service warrants it.

Finland

With numerous ski resorts, vibrant modern cities, a rich cultural history, and the world-famous Northern Lights, Finland is popular with visitors from all over the world. Tipping in Finland is complicated, and it is how and when you leave the gratuity that is more important than how much.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Service charges are not commonplace in Finland, and you are not expected to tip. If, however, you find that the service you have received has been exceptional, you can leave your server a tip and give it to them directly. €5-€10 (~$5.50-$11) would be sufficient.
  • Hotels – Tipping your hotel staff is not expected or customary, but you may want to leave €10-€20 (~$11-$22) at the end of your stay, to be divided between the porters, maids, and other staff.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You are not expected to tip tour guides at all, and you only need to round up the taxi fare if your driver has been exceptionally helpful.

France

As one of the most popular tourist nations in the world, France offers everything from ancient cities and world-famous landmarks to tropical beaches, fine cuisine, and world-class skiing. Tipping in France is not mandatory, but it is good etiquette to leave one.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Under French law, service charges cannot be included in your bill, but if the service has been good, you should leave 10 percent for your servers. In bars or cafes, leave a few extra euros with your bill as a tip.
  • Hotels – You should leave €1 (~$1) per bag for the porter or bellboy and the same per day for the maid. Be sure to offer the concierge a larger gratuity of around €10 (~$11) at the end of your stay.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should tip your tour guide around €5 (~$5) and a little less for the driver, per person, per day.

Georgia

Georgia lies at the borders of both Europe and Asia and is a melting pot of ancient cites, diverse modern cultures, and Soviet history. Tipping in Georgia is commonplace but not mandatory.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Many eateries already include the 10 percent service charge in your bill. If you do not see it, you should consider leaving the same but only if you were happy with the service.
  • Hotels – Upscale hotels will expect you to tip the bellboy, porter, and maids about $1 in local currency depending on the service they provide. You do not usually need to worry about tipping in lower-end establishments.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should be prepared to tip your tour guide as much as 10-15 percent of the cost of the tour and a further 5 percent for the driver. If you are on a group tour, you may wish to all put your money together at the end instead.

Germany

Offering a ton of traditional charm combined with state-of-the-art amenities, modern cities, great food, and a vast array of culture, visitors come to sample to world-famous beer and experience the German way of life. Tipping in Germany is customary within the service industries.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Cash is king in Germany, and most restaurants will simply expect you to hand 5-10 percent of the cost of your meal directly to your server.
  • Hotels – You should expect to leave around €1 (~$1) per bag for the porter and a further €3-€5 (~$3-$5.50) for the housekeeper.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You don’t need to tip your taxi driver, but you should round up the fare at the end. You should also consider leaving a tip as much as 10 percent of the tour cost for the guide and the driver.
Greece
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Greece

The European nation of Greece plays host to millions of visitors every year, all looking to experience miles of sandy beaches, tranquil waters, great food, and amazing culture. Tipping in Greece is definitely customary, but it’s not obligatory.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Some restaurants will round up the bill instead of adding a service charge. If there is no extra charge, then a gratuity of 5-10 percent should be left on the table or given to the waiter directly.
  • Hotels – It is customary to leave the bellboy or porter €1 (~$1) per bag, and leave the same again next to the bed for the housekeeper.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – It is customary to tip the tour guide and you should consider leaving €3-€5 (~$3-$5.50) per person, per day.

Hungary

Hungary is a country of amazing architecture, fabulous folklore, delicious food, and vibrant nightlife. The capital city of Budapest is one of the top city break destinations in the world. Tipping in Hungary is appreciated, but not mandatory.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Many restaurants will add as much as 12.5 percent service charge to your bill, so you don’t need to worry about leaving any extra.
  • Hotels – You should tip the bellboy around ~$1.50 in local currency and your housekeepers around $1 every day that you stay there.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tip your taxi driver 10 percent of the cost of the total fare, and tip your tour guide based on the length and duration of the tour. The average tip for tour guides in Hungary is $1-$2 in local currency.

Iceland

Iceland is diverse and beautiful with fantastic scenery, fun-filled towns and cities, and some of the most incredible natural phenomenons in the world. Visitors come to party in Reykjavik, and it is especially popular from mid-May to late July when the country is bathed in 24-hour sunlight. Tipping is not commonplace in Iceland.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Restaurant bills often include a service charge, but if not, you should tip around 10 percent of the bill. In smaller establishments, you could also round up the bill.
  • Hotels – It is not customary to tip bellboys, porters, or other front-of-house staff in Icelandic hotels. It is a nice touch, however, to leave some local money for your maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You will not be expected to leave a tip for your taxi driver or tour guide, but if the service was exceptional, you might leave them a small tip to show your appreciation.

Ireland

From natural wonders like the Cliffs of Moher and the Giant’s Causeway to cities full of culture and vibrant nightlife, Ireland is a small country with a lot to offer. Tipping is commonplace in Ireland.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Many restaurants already add a service charge to the bill, but if you do not see one, you should tip 10-15 percent of the cost of the meal. You can dispute the service charge if you do not feel the service was good enough.
  • Hotels – You should tip the porter about $1 in local currency and leave the same for housekeeping.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – If you are on a group tour, a hat or bucket is usually passed around at the end of the tour. If you have booked to be privately shown the sights, you should leave 10 percent of the cost as a tip.

Italy

Italy is another of the most visited countries in the world, home to some of the most romantic and beautiful cities in the world, as well as the Vatican, a ton of famous artwork, and fantastic food. Tipping is not expected in Italy.

  • Restaurants and Bars – A service charge may be added to your bill, but the restaurant must make you aware of it. If there is no service charge, you can simply round up the bill, or hand a few euros to your server instead.
  • Hotels – You should leave a couple of euros for the porter and the same again for the housekeeper. When you leave, you can tip the concierge if they offered you a good service.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tours are popular in Italian cities, and you should tip the guide €5-€10 (~$5-$11) depending on the length of the tour. Your taxi driver will not expect a tip, but round up the bill if you want to.
Latvia
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Latvia

This Baltic nation is full of surprises, including beautiful beaches, quaint cobbled streets, and warm and welcoming people. Tipping in Latvia is not commonplace, but always appreciated.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Many restaurants already include a service charge on the bill. If you do not see it, you should leave a tip of 5-10 percent if the service was good.
  • Hotels – You are not expected to tip the staff in your hotel.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You can round your taxi fare up to the nearest euro, but you do not need to leave a tip, and tour guides and drivers can be given your loose change at the end of the tour.

Liechtenstein

This tiny German-speaking principality is packed full of medieval castles, alpine landscapes, and quaint Germanic villages. Tipping is not commonplace and never expected in Liechtenstein.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Many restaurants will include a service charge in your bill. If there isn’t one, and the service was great, add around 5 percent to your bill.
  • Hotels – Most hotels will include a service charge in your final bill, so there is no need to tip the hotel staff separately.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Service charges will be included in both taxi fares and guided tours, so you do not need to tip extra here either.

Lithuania

Deserted sand dunes, castles, lakes, and vibrant cities full of friendly people make Lithuania a real jewel in the crown of Europe. Tipping in Lithuania is not very commonplace, but always appreciated.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Check to see if there is a service charge already added to your bill. If there isn’t one, you should tip your server 5-10 percent.
  • Hotels – Tipping hotel staff is not common or really warranted in Lithuania.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You don’t need to tip your taxi driver, and you won’t be expected to tip your tour guide either.

Luxembourg

The tiny Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg is one of the safest nations in the world, and travelers come to take in the rich cultural, historical, architectural, and industrial heritage of the country. Tipping in Luxembourg is much more commonplace than it is in most other European countries.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Most restaurants will add a service charge of 15 percent to your bill. At really fancy establishments, you will be expected to leave as much as 10 percent more on top of that.
  • Hotels – You should be ready to tip €1 (~$1) for the bellboy and double that per night for the housekeeping staff.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers and tour guides will expect a tip equivalent to around 10 percent of the total fare or cost of the tour.

Macedonia

A country rich in Greek, Roman, and Ottoman heritage, Macedonia is equal parts Balkan and Mediterranean and offers a completely different kind of European experience. Tipping in Macedonia is not uncommon, but not yet well-practiced.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Some restaurants will add a service charge to the bill. If you don’t see one, tip 10 percent of the bill instead, or just leave loose change in smaller eateries.
  • Hotels – There is no need to tip the hotel staff, but if you want to, you should keep a few euros spare for the porter and the housekeeper.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should round up the taxi fare, or add 10 percent of the cost of the tour to keep your tour guide happy.
Malta
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Malta

Malta is one of the smallest countries in Europe and is a popular destination for beach lovers and history buffs alike. Famous for its dramatic cliffs and stunning landscapes, tipping has become customary in Malta.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Some restaurants may include a service charge in your bill, but if there isn’t one, you should tip 5-10 percent of the bill.
  • Hotels – In Malta, hotels often command a service charge of around 10 percent, as well as expecting tourists to tip staff directly. For porters and bellboys, €1-€2 (~$1-$2) per bag is about right, and you should leave a little bit more for the maid every morning.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Your tour guide should receive 10 percent of the total cost of the tour, and the driver should receive at least half that again. For taxi drivers, you should round up the fare.

Moldova

With the dubious honor of being Europe’s most impoverished nation, Moldova still has lots to offer, including stunning scenery, fantastic wineries, and vast cultural history. Tipping is starting to become increasingly popular in Moldova.

  • Restaurants and Bars – A service charge is often included in restaurant bills, but a further 5-10 percent tip is expected on top.
  • Hotels – You should keep loose change to tip the bellboy, porter, and the maid at your hotel.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers and tour guides would both welcome a tip at the end of the journey or tour; leave as much as you feel is appropriate.

Monaco

This independent city-state on the Mediterranean coastline is famous for its casinos, yachts, fancy hotels, and the prestigious Grand Prix that takes over the streets once a year. Tipping is customary in Monaco.

  • Restaurants and Bars – A service charge of around 15 percent will be added to the bill in most restaurants, but if it is not, you should add 15 percent yourself. It is also customary to add 15 percent to your bar bill, too.
  • Hotels – Tipping is customary in all hotels, and you should expect to tip the bellboy, porters, and valet a couple of euros per bag, and a little less for the housekeepers.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers don’t expect to receive a tip in Monaco, but your tour guide will. Leaving around 10 percent for the guide and their driver is a nice gesture.

Montenegro

The Balkan country of Montenegro is famous for its stunning black mountains, sun-drenched beaches, and quaint towns and villages. Tipping is becoming increasingly commonplace in Montenegro.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Check for a service charge on the bill, but if there isn’t one, you should leave a tip of around 10 percent.
  • Hotels – You should tip the bellboy or porter €1 (~$1) per bag and the maid a little more, but only in upscale hotels.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should tip the taxi driver around 5-10 percent of the fare and the same for your tour guide and driver.

Netherlands

The home of clogs, canals, and cafes, the Netherlands may be low-lying, but they are high on the list of many would-be adventurers. Tipping isn’t generally expected in the Netherlands.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If the service in a restaurant is above average, you should consider tipping 5-10 percent of the bill. If it was anything less, simply round up the bill. In bars and cafes, leave your loose change with the bill.
  • Hotels – Tipping is not expected in Dutch hotels, but if you want to show your gratitude, you can pass €1-€2 (~$1-$2) to the bellboy, porter, and the maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You do not need to tip your taxi driver, but you can round up the fare if you wish to. For your tour guide or driver, you can leave whatever you feel is appropriate.
Aurora Borealis Norway
Image Credit: Manolo Franco via Pixabay

Norway

Famous for outstanding natural attractions such as the fjords, mountains, and Midnight Sun, Norway is also home to vibrant cities that extend a warm welcome to visitors. Tipping is not customary in Norway.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Tipping is not common in Norway, but rounding up the bill is. The same tipping etiquette applies to bars and cafes, too.
  • Hotels – No need to worry about tipping hotel staff, as this is not done in Norway.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You do not need to tip your taxi driver, but you can round up the fare; tour guides will not except a tip either.

Poland

Extensive national parks, winding rivers, and great food are just a few reasons to visit Poland. The picturesque cities such as Kraków, Warsaw, and Gdańsk are also popular attractions for out-of-towners. Tipping in Poland is always expected, but it is customary to reward good service.

  • Restaurants and Bars – In big cities, it is customary to leave 10 percent of the bill as a tip. You should try to remember to tip in cash and hand it directly to your server. You can tip your bartender a little more on each round of drinks if you want to.
  • Hotels – It is not necessary to tip your bellboy or porter, but you could leave the maid a little something for their service.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – For well-executed tours, it is customary to tip your tour guide and driver 10-15 percent of the cost of the tour.

Portugal

The beaches of the Algarve, world-renowned cuisine, and spectacular landscapes make Portugal one of the Mediterranean’s most popular vacation destinations. There is no real tipping culture in Portugal.

  • Restaurants and Bars – There are no hard and fast rules for tipping here, but if you are in an upscale establishment, watch out for the service charge in the bill. If there isn’t one, you can tip as much as 10 percent if you want to. Leaving a cash tip will ensure that your servers receive it.
  • Hotels – You will not be expected to tip the hotel staff, but leaving €1 (~$1) for the bellboy or porter, and the same for housekeeping, helps to show your appreciation.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – If you are on a free tour, you should tip the guide at least €10 (~$11) to pay for their time. For paid tours, leave a tip at the end for both the guide and the driver.

Romania

This southeastern European country is best known for its beautiful medieval towns, ancient ruins, the city of Bucharest, and the legend of Count Dracula. Tipping is commonplace in Romania.

  • Restaurants and Bars – The service charge is not usually included in the bill in Romanian restaurants. Serving staff are not well paid, so it is customary to leave a tip of at least 10 percent of the bill. The same rules apply to bars.
  • Hotels – You should be ready to tip your maid at least $1 per day in local currency, and your porter or bellboy should be given the same per bag for their service (sometimes more).
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should tip your tour guide at least $2-$5 per day in local currency and a similar amount for the driver if there is one. Taxi drivers will also expect to receive a tip of around $1 per fare.

Russia

The largest nation on earth, Russia, is a vast landmass that offers everything from frozen tundras to sub-tropical beaches, modern cities, and ancient landmarks. Tipping in Russia is commonplace.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You should tip your server 10-15 percent of the cost of your meal, and always hand it directly to them in cash.
  • Hotels – You should tip the bellboy or porter the local equivalent of $0.50-$1.50 for each bag, and the maid should receive double that each day during your stay. If the concierge provides additional services during your stay, you should tip him or her, too.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should tip your tour guide at least $5 per day in local currency and half that again for the driver. Taxi drivers will also expect a tip, and you should be prepared to pay 10 percent of the fare.
San Marino
Image Credit: David Mark via Pixabay

San Marino

This tiny micro-state is situated close to north Italy and is known to be one of the world’s oldest republics with its mountainous towns and villages. Visitors come to explore the ancient citadels, and tipping is commonplace in San Marino.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You should tip your server around 10 percent of the bill.
  • Hotels – You should be ready to leave a small tip in local currency for the bellboy, porter, and maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should tip your tour guide and driver a small amount of local currency at the end of the tour.

Serbia

With a rich history that spans the Roman, Byzantine, Ottoman, Habsburg, and Yugoslav eras, Serbia is one of Europe’s best-kept secrets and has diverse landscapes, ancient ruins, and excellent cuisine. Tipping is not obligatory.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You can add up to 10 percent of the bill if you wish to leave a tip, but you should pay this in cash and hand it directly to your servers.
  • Hotels – You can keep some low denomination local currency to hand to tip the bellboy or porter, and then leave some more in your room for the housekeeper.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should round up the fare for taxi drivers, and tip your tour guide and driver at the end of the tour.

Slovakia

With a rich cultural history, ancient castles, and stunning scenery, Slovakia is fast-gaining a reputation for offering superb skiing at affordable prices. Tipping here is not particularly commonplace.

  • Restaurants and Bars – If there is no service charge on the bill, you could add up to 10 percent of the cost of the meal in cash and give it directly to your server.
  • Hotels – Loose change can be given to the bellboy or porter and housekeeper, too.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should round up the fare for taxi drivers. For tours, you can include some small amounts as a tip for your guide.

Slovenia

Famous for its mountains, ski resorts, medieval castles, and quaint cobbled streets, Slovenia is a heady mix of ancient facades and 20th-century architecture. Tipping is not obligatory in Slovenia.

  • Restaurants and Bars – In tourist rich areas, it is customary to add a 10 percent tip to the cost of your meal, and hand it to your server in cash.
  • Hotels – Hotel staff will be happy to receive a small tip for helping to carry your luggage or clean your room.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Round up the fare for your taxi driver and tip your tour guide if you were impressed by the tour.

Spain

With some of the most enjoyable climates in Europe, incredible landscapes, and beautiful beaches, Spain is one of the most visited tourist destinations in the world. Tipping is not very common.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Some restaurants may already include a small service charge on your bill, but if you do not see this written down, then go ahead and feel free to add up to 10 percent of your bill as a tip. Make sure that this money goes to the server and not just the restaurant.
  • Hotels – If your hotel has a porter, you should be prepared to leave a couple of euros for a tip, and you should also leave the maid a few euros extra every day.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Many tour guides are self-employed and rely on tips to supplement their incomes. Make them feel appreciated by paying them as much as €10 (~$11) per person, per day. Save some extra to pay the driver, too. Taxi drivers don’t expect a tip but round up the fare where you can.
Sweden
Image Credit: Wolfgang Heubeck via Pixabay

Sweden

Sweden is a land of saunas, endless sunshine, superb cities, and some of the best flatpack furniture in the world. Visitors come to experience the very best of Scandinavian living, and while tipping is generally not part of Swedish culture, it is becoming more popular in tourist areas.

  • Restaurants and Bars – More often than not, a gratuity is often included as part of a service charge, but if it is not included, you should leave 5-10 percent of the bill. In Sweden, not tipping too much is as important as tipping too little. If you are in a bar, you should leave a little extra when you pay.
  • Hotels – Service charges for the hotel staff are usually included in the bill when you leave. You can also leave small tips for porters, bellboys, and even the maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You are not expected to leave a tip for your tour guide or taxi driver, but you can leave change at the end if you want to.

Switzerland

Switzerland is famous for amazing chocolate, picture-perfect castles, scenic train rides, and superb skiing. Visitors come from all over the world to experience the Swiss Alps, and tipping is not particularly commonplace.

  • Restaurants and Bars – There will usually be a service charge included in your bill. If you want to leave more or leave a tip where no charge is included, you should round up your bill. Tips aren’t really expected in bars.
  • Hotels – Tipping hotel staff is one of the few places where tipping is prevalent. Keep loose change on hand to tip the bellboy, porter, and maid to thank them for their services.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You do not need to leave a tip for your tour guide and you don’t need to tip your taxi driver either.

Ukraine

Ukraine is famous for its Orthodox churches and Black Sea coastline, as well as the lively capital city of Kiev and the largest catacomb system in the world. Tipping in Ukraine is not part of the culture, but is expected from Westerners.

  • Restaurants and Bars – In larger eateries, you should tip around 10 percent for good service. In cafes and smaller establishments, you can simply round up the bill.
  • Hotels – In upscale hotels, you should tip the bellboy or porter the local equivalent of $1 and about the same for the cleaning staff. Check your final bill, though, as some hotels automatically add a 20 percent service charge.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should tip your tour guide the equivalent of $15-$20 per day, per person, and round up the fare for your taxi driver.

United Kingdom

Home to Buckingham Palace, London, and some of the most beautiful scenery in the world, the U.K. is a major tourist destination for visitors from every corner of the globe. Tipping here is a reward for good service rather than something expected.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Expect to pay a tip of around 10 percent in restaurants or anywhere where food is brought to your table. Some establishments include a service charge, but you can ask to have this removed if you are not happy with the service. It is also acceptable to hand cash tips directly to your waitstaff.
  • Hotels – You should tip the porter a couple of pounds per bag, and while you are not expected to tip the cleaner, you can leave some cash on the side when you leave.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers appreciate a rounded up fare, and you should consider tipping your tour guide as much as £5 (~$6.50) per day, per person.

Vatican

This tiny city-state in Italy is the headquarters of the Roman Catholic Church and home to the Pope himself and a myriad of iconic religious buildings, art, and architecture. Tipping in the Vatican is not really expected.

  • Restaurants and Bars – There are cafeteria-style restaurants inside city walls and you are not required to tip in any of them.
  • Hotels – There are no hotels in Vatican City.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – A tour of the Vatican is worth its weight in gold to ensure you don’t miss a single thing. You should, therefore, tip your tour guide generously, as much as $20 per day in local currency.

Tipping Etiquette & Guide for the Middle East

Bahrain
Image Credit: Todd Gardner via Unplash

Bahrain

This popular tourist destination in the Middle East is home to historic Arab settlements, state of the art cities, stunning beaches, glorious weather, and welcoming multi-cultural society. Tipping is customary in Bahrain.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Most restaurants will add a service charge of 10-15 percent to your bill. If they do not, you are not obligated to leave a tip, but you should if you feel the service warrants it. In bars and cafes, it is acceptable to round up the change.
  • Hotels – Service charges are again included in your hotel bill, but it not uncommon for Western tourists to tip the bellboy or the porter and leave local money in the room for the maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers will expect to receive about 10 percent on top of the cost of the fare, and you should tip tour guides or drivers about the same.

Iran

This Islamic republic on the Persian Gulf is one of the world’s oldest continuous civilizations, and these days it is also home to some of the most opulent cities and attractions in the world. Tipping is a strange game in Iran as gratuities are often refused before they are accepted.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Upscale restaurants will include a service charge of around 10 percent in your bill. In bars and other establishments, you can round up the bill or try to offer cash directly to your server.
  • Hotels – Tipping is only expected in Western-style hotels where you should tip the bellboy a few dollars (in local currency) per bag, and leave the same again in your room for the maids.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You can round up the fare to leave a small tip for the taxi driver. You should tip your tour guide about 10 percent of the tour cost and half of that again for the driver.

Iraq

Iraq is not an easy country to visit, with ongoing unrest and terrorism making it unsafe for Western visitors. In less turbulent times, it is a land of breathtaking scenery, vibrant cities, and countless historic attractions. Tipping in Iraq is not common and is mostly never expected either.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Some more fancy establishments may include a service charge of 10 percent in the bill. If you don’t see one, but felt that the service was good, you may leave your own.
  • Hotels – Tipping is not expected in Iraqi hotels, but you may leave small local denomination notes for the bellboy, porter, or maids if you wish to.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You can round up the taxi fare, and only tip your tour guide if you feel the service is worthy of it.

Israel

Home to the spiritual homeland of 3 world religions, Israel is a small country with a lot to offer. From beautiful beaches to vibrant cities, visitors come to Israel for a million different reasons. Tipping is commonplace in Israel.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You should leave 10-15 percent as a tip on top of your bill, but ask your server if any of the gratuity comes to them. If not, leave it in cash. You should tip your bartender per round, too.
  • Hotels – You should tip the bellboy or porter around $1.50 per bag carried, and leave $1.50-$3 per day for your maid, all in local currency.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You are not expected to tip your taxi driver, but you can round up the fare for good service. Your tour guide and driver should receive a tip of around 15 percent of the cost of the tour. Tipping tour guides is very common in Israel, and if you embark on a private tour, you may want to tip them even more.

Jordan

Jordan is an Arab nation that is home to a plethora of ancient sites and monuments, stunning beaches, and the famous archaeological site of Petra. Tipping in Jordan is very much part of the culture.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Most restaurants will add a service charge of 10 percent to your bill. You should also add 5-10 percent on top to give to your server. In bars, you should also expect to pay at least a 10 percent service charge.
  • Hotels – Hotels will also add a 10 percent service charge to your final bill, but this is not for the staff. Therefore, you should tip your bellboy or porter around $1.50-$3 per bag, your maid at least $3 per night, and the concierge up to $28 at the end of your stay, all in local currency.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Round up the fare for your taxi driver. Your tour guide should be given as much as 10 percent of the cost of your tour and half of that again for the driver.
Kuwait
Image Credit: luisqb via Pixabay

Kuwait

Home to the Grand Mosque and Kuwait Towers, Kuwait is a prosperous nation that has one of the lowest numbers of Western visitors in the Middle East. Tipping in Kuwait is very much discretionary.

  • Restaurants and Bars – A 10 percent service charge will usually be added to your bill, but you may also want to add a little more to give directly to your servers. Alcohol consumption in Kuwait is forbidden, so you are more likely to visit a coffee shop than a bar. You should leave a small tip for waitstaff in local currency.
  • Hotels – There will often be a 10 percent service charge added to your final bill. You are not expected to tip the hotel staff, but you can leave a small amount in local currency for the maids, or tip the bellboy or porter direct.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should tip your taxi driver around 10 percent of the fare, and if you are off on a guided tour, consider tipping a similar amount.

Lebanon

Lebanon is a country filled with ancient ruins, religious temples, and the vibrant city of Beirut. Tipping is customary in Lebanon.

  • Restaurants and Bars – In Western-style hotels, you will usually find a service charge of around 15 percent automatically added to your bill. If you do not see one, you should tip your waiter 10-15 percent anyway.
  • Hotels – Staff will expect to be tipped in local currency, and you should budget around $2.50 for bellboys, porters, valets, and maids. You may want to tip your concierge more.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You can round up the fare for your taxi driver, and you should add at least 15 percent to the cost of a tour for your guide and their driver.

Oman

From beach holidays in Muscat to diving, fossil hunting, and desert camping, Oman is the country for sophisticated travelers who like to do and see more. Tipping is not customary in Oman, but Western visitors often do so anyway.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You should add a tip of at least 10 percent of the total cost of your bill as a tip for your servers.
  • Hotels – You should carry local currency so that you can tip your bellboy, porter, valet, and cleaners to the value of $1-$2.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You can round up your taxi fares and leave a tip for your tour guide at the end in the region of $13 (in local currency) for a 5-day trip.

Qatar

The Arab nation of Qatar is known for its sand dunes and beaches, futuristic skyscrapers, and prolific Islamic art. Qatar is also one of the richest countries in the world, and tipping is commonplace in larger towns and cities.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Most restaurants in Qatar will include a service charge with the bill, but none of this will usually be passed on to the waitstaff. Be a nice tourist, and leave a further 10-15 percent for your servers.
  • Hotels – Tip your doorman, bellboys, porters, and maid at least $3-$4 in local currency to reward good service.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tour guides in Qatar are usually tipped about $5 a day in local currency, and the driver around the same. You should also tip your taxi driver by rounding up the fare.

Saudi Arabia

As the birthplace of Islam and home to the cities of Mecca and Medina, Saudi Arabia is one of the last great nations to not succumb to the lure of the tourist dollar, although this is changing. Tipping in Saudi Arabia is becoming more commonplace.

  • Restaurants and Bars – You will be expected to tip 10-15 percent unless there already is a service charge added to the bill.
  • Hotels – There are many luxury hotels in Saudi Arabia, and it is becoming increasingly common to tip the bellboys, valets, porters, and maid with the local equivalent of $1-$2.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Club together with other guests on your tour and provide your guide with an envelope of cash at the end. The final amount should equate to around $10 per day, per person (in local currency). You should also tip the driver about $5 per day.

Syria

Syria is home to some of the oldest civilizations in the world. It is a country of great beauty and diversely differing landscapes. Unfortunately, it is also besieged by civil war and terrorism, and currently travel to Syria is not recommended.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Some restaurants may include a service charge, but usually, it will be down to you to choose how much to tip. Westerners are often expected to tip where locals may not be.
  • Hotels – Keep small local cash handy to tip your bellboy, porter, and maid.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Tours in Syria can be dangerous, so you should show your appreciation to your tour guide and driver as generously as you can.
Turkey
Image Credit: Free-Photos via Pixabay

Turkey

Home to the iconic Hagia Sophia, beautiful beaches, and excellent value for money tourist resorts, Turkey is popular with those looking to enjoy the sunshine while enjoying a taste of the Middle East. Tipping is very much part of the culture in Turkey.

  • Restaurants and Bars – In Turkey, it is customary to tip 5-10 percent, depending on service. You should hand over your tips in cash (Turkish lira) where you can.
  • Hotels – You should be ready to tip your bellboy, porter, or valet around $1 per bag in local currency and the same amount again for room service.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – You should leave $1.50-$2.50 in local currency as a tip for your tour guide and a similar amount for the driver. If you need to take a taxi, be ready to round up the fare on arrival.

United Arab Emirates

Being a federation of 7 different Emirates, UAE is home to some of the most opulent destinations in the world, including Abu Dhabi and its Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque, Dubai with it’s extravagant Burj Khalifa tower, and the Jebel Jais in Ras Al Khaimah. Tipping is common practice in the Emirates.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Restaurants and hotel bars usually include a service charge of 10-15 percent to your bill. This will not go directly to the waitstaff, so you may want to leave them a cash tip on top of this.
  • Hotels – You should tip porters, bellboys, and the valet the local equivalent of $1.50-$3. It is customary to leave a larger tip for your cleaner at the end of your stay, and the same for the concierge if you have found them to be helpful.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – Taxi drivers do not expect a tip, but you can always round up the fare. Tour guides and their drivers do expect to be tipped, and you should consider leaving around 10 percent of the cost of the tour at the end of each day.

Yemen

Yemen has a rich cultural heritage and is home to the iconic Dar al-Hajar, the fascinating Socotra Island and cities steeped in ancient history. It also, sadly, a country that has suffered from decades of civil war. Tipping in Yemen is not very common.

  • Restaurants and Bars – Upscale restaurants will expect you to tip the standard 10 percent, while smaller eateries, cafes, and coffee shops will be happy with cash tips or rounding up the bill. Yemen is a dry country, so you probably won’t be drinking in a bar.
  • Hotels – Hotels do not expect you to tip in Yemen, but you can leave small amounts of local cash for the bellboy or cleaner.
  • Guides, Tours, and Drivers – If you are taking a taxi, you should round up the fare, and if you are planning on joining a guided tour, be mindful to include a 10 percent tip for the tour guide and half again for the driver.

Final Thoughts

Take the time to research your tipping obligations in each country you are planning to visit. After all, nobody wants to look like a lazy tipper, or come across a little too strong.

Finally, if you are still unsure of what you should tip, to whom, and when, ask your hotel concierge (if you have one), desk staff, or even the front-of-house team in the restaurant — they will be able to set you straight.

Other Tipping Guide Resources


Frequently asked questions

What is an appropriate tip?

This can vary a lot by country and situation, but a rough rule of thumb is that 10 percent works in most instances for tour guides. 10 percent is also a good restaurant tip except for countries that are heavily visited or influenced by American tourism, in which case 15-20 percent might be more appropriate.

Is it against the law to not tip?

There is no legal requirement to leave a tip but in some countries where wages are severely subsidized with tips, it is rude to not leave one.

Should you tip if gratuity is included?

Usually if a service charge or gratuity is included, you do not need to leave a tip. 2 instances where this may not be the case is if the service was exceptional and you wanted to show even more appreciation. Also, some restaurants include a service charge which does not go to the servers. If you are unsure, ask, and then hand a cash tip directly to the server.

Is it rude to tip in Europe?

Tipping is not considered rude in Europe, but tipping 15-20 percent is quite excessive. Rounding up the bill is quite common or tipping 10 percent for great service.

Amar Hussain

About Amar Hussain

Amar was born and raised in England, UK, embarked on an 11 country round the world gap year after graduation and then became well and truly hooked. The first gap year inspired a second which ended up being a 23 country down-the-world trip from Canada to Antarctica. Since then Amar has endeavored to turn his gap year into a ‘gap life’ and has spent the last 10 years traveling the 7 continents.

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