The Definitive Guide to Aer Lingus’ Direct Routes from The U.S. [Plane Types & Seat Options]

Full Disclosure: We may be compensated when you click on links to credit card products from our advertising partners, such as American Express, Chase, Citi, Capital One & Barclays. Opinions on this site are ours alone, and have not been reviewed or approved by the issuer. See our Advertiser Disclosure for more details. Thanks!

Aer Lingus, the flag carrier of Ireland, is a rapidly expanding airline. With a geographic location that’s easily accessible from the United States, it’s no wonder that Aer Lingus has been adding flights. This is especially true for the East Coast. As the second largest airline in Ireland, you should have no trouble finding an Aer Lingus flight from the U.S.

In this guide, we’ll be analyzing all of Aer Lingus’ nonstop routes between the United States and Ireland. We’ve got a bit of ground to cover, so let’s begin.

Seat Options by Aircraft Type

Aer Lingus is generally reliable when it comes to operating their aircraft on specific routes. In addition, Aer Lingus’ location makes for a relatively short flight from the United States to Ireland, so we won’t be seeing high-capacity aircraft such as the 777, 747, 787, or A380.

Instead, Aer Lingus operates using a mostly point-to-point model, connecting smaller cities in the United States to Ireland.

Ireland acquires most of its air passengers from tourism, which is why the aircrafts operated are smaller than, say, British Airways, which routinely uses the A380 and 747.

Check out our table below on the complete route guide that connects the United States to Ireland on Aer Lingus:

RouteFlight No.AircraftCabin ClassesFrequency
San Francisco (SFO) – Dublin (DUB)EI 146Mixed: Mostly A330-300 and sometimes A330-200Business, EconomyDaily
Los Angeles (LAX) – Dublin (DUB)EI 144Mixed: Mostly A330-300 and sometimes A330-200Business, Economy4x weekly
Chicago (ORD) – Dublin (DUB)EI 124Mixed: 757-200 and A330-300Business, EconomyDaily
Miami (MIA) – Dublin (DUB)EI 140A330-200Business, Economy3x weekly
Washington D.C. (IAD) – Dublin (DUB)EI 118757-200Business, Economy4x weekly
Philadelphia (PHL) – Dublin (DUB)EI 114757-200Business, Economy4x weekly
Newark (EWR) – Dublin (DUB)EI 100Mixed: A330-300 mostly and sometimes A330-200Business, Economy4x weekly
New York City (JFK) – Dublin (DUB)EI 104/108A330-300Business, Economy2x daily
Hartford (BDL) – Dublin (DUB)EI 130757-200Business, Economy3x weekly
Boston (BOS) – Dublin (DUB)EI 136A330-300Business, EconomyDaily
Orlando (MCO) – Dublin (DUB)EI 120Mixed: Mostly A330-300 and sometimes A330-200Business, Economy3x weekly
Seattle (SEA) – Dublin (DUB)EI 142Mixed: Mostly A330-200 and sometimes A330-300Business, Economy3x weekly
New York City (JFK) – Shannon (SNN)EI 110757-200Business, Economy6x weekly

Now, let’s talk a bit about the different ways to fly Aer Lingus using points and miles.

Best Points to Earn to Fly Aer Lingus

Aer Lingus happens to be owned by the same parent company as British Airways and Iberia. British Airways and Iberia are both Oneworld airlines, but Aer Lingus is currently not a formal member.

You can redeem United MileagePlus miles (through North American gateways only), Aer Lingus Avios, British Airways Avios, and Cathay Pacific Asia Miles for travel on Aer Lingus.

Aer Lingus doesn’t have many partners you can redeem miles with, but you’ll still have a few options to use points for flights on Aer Lingus.

Unfortunately, Aer Lingus doesn’t currently offer any first class seat options on their routes between Ireland and the United States.

Aer Lingus Business Class Options

Aer Lingus 757 Business Class
Aer Lingus 757 business class. Image courtesy of businesstraveller.com.

Aer Lingus offers both narrow-body and wide-body aircraft options on flights to Ireland. The goal of business class is to enjoy a lie-flat bed, good food, and a peaceful flight to your destination.

Aer Lingus doesn’t disappoint in this regard, as long as you pick the best seats. In business class, you’ll enjoy a cheerful in-flight experience, decent award redemptions, and good food and beverage selections.

Without further ado, here’s our business class ranking on Aer Lingus’ flights to and from the United States:

  • 757
  • A330-200
  • A330-300

Aer Lingus 757 Business Class

The 757 was chosen as our first place winner because of the intimate business class cabin size. On this narrow-body aircraft, there are only 12 business class seats!

Each seat is fully lie-flat. The seats are 22 inches wide, 60 inches in pitch, and 78 inches in bed length. The seats themselves are a Thompson Vantage XL seat.

Here’s what the seat map looks like:

Aer Lingus 757 Business Class Seat Map
Aer Lingus 757 business class seat map. Image courtesy of seatguru.com.

As you can see, the seat map is intriguing because not all seats have direct aisle access. The best seats are known as the throne seats, which you should always reserve if you can.

If you’re sitting in rows 1 and 3, you’ll have a much better experience than those seated at rows 2 and 4, due to the additional privacy. You also won’t need to walk over anyone when getting up from your seat to use the lavatories.

The best business class seats on the Aer Lingus 757 are 3A and 3F because 1A and 1F are too close to the lavatory and may be noisy.

You can find Aer Lingus’ 757 flown on the following routes:

  • Chicago (ORD) – Dublin (DUB) sometimes
  • Washington D.C. (IAD) – Dublin (DUB)
  • Philadelphia (PHL) – Dublin (DUB)
  • Hartford (BDL) – Dublin (DUB)
  • New York City (JFK) – Shannon (SNN)

Aer Lingus A330-200 Business Class

Our second-place winner is the A330-200, which is also known as the older version of the A330. The A330 is a wide-body aircraft featuring more seating capacity.

As far as the seats go, the A330-200 business class seats on Aer Lingus are significantly smaller. Each seat is 21 inches wide with a pitch of 58 inches.

There are a total of 23 business class seats, all of which are designed the same way in a lie-flat Thompson Vantage XL-style.

Here’s what the seat map looks like:

Aer Lingus A330-200 Business Class Seat Map
Aer Lingus A330-200 business class seat map. Image courtesy of seatguru.com.

As you can see the seating configuration is quite different from the 757. The best seats are 3K and 5K, which are both throne seats. If you can’t reserve those, the next best seats are the window seats at 3A and 5A.

You can find this Aer Lingus A330-200 business class seating arrangement on these routes:

  • San Francisco (SFO) – Dublin (DUB) sometimes
  • Los Angeles (LAX) – Dublin (DUB) sometimes
  • Miami (MIA) – Dublin (DUB)
  • Newark (EWR) – Dublin (DUB) sometimes
  • Seattle (SEA) – Dublin (DUB) mostly
  • Orlando (MCO) – Dublin (DUB) sometimes

Aer Lingus A330-300 Business Class

Our last place for business class goes to the A330-300. The business class section is the largest and the seats are smaller, which is why the A330-300 falls in last place.

The seats on the A330-300 are identical in size to the A330-200, 21 inches wide and 58 inches in pitch. The main difference is that instead of 23 business class seats on the A330-200, there are 30 business class seats on the A330-300, an increase of 30%.

Here’s what the business class section’s seat map looks like:

Aer Lingus A330-300 Business Class Seat Map
Aer Lingus A330-300 business class seat map. Image courtesy of seatguru.com.

As we already discussed, the most preferred seats are throne seats, of which there are 3 in this cabin. These are 3K, 5K, and 7K. You would want to pick 5K first, followed by 3K and 7K last. This is due to the distance from the lavatories.

If the throne seats are all reserved, which is a very strong possibility, the next best options are 2A, 4A, and 6A. These are true window seats and are much more private than aisle seats in 3A, 5A, and 7A.

You’ll find Aer Lingus flying this business class configuration on the A330-300, which is utilized on these routes:

  • San Francisco (SFO) – Dublin (DUB) mostly
  • Los Angeles (LAX) – Dublin (DUB) mostly
  • Chicago (ORD) – Dublin (DUB) mostly
  • Newark (EWR) – Dublin (DUB) mostly
  • New York City (JFK) – Dublin (DUB)
  • Boston (BOS) – Dublin (DUB)
  • Seattle (SEA) – Dublin (DUB) sometimes
  • Orlando (MCO) – Dublin (DUB) mostly

Bottom Line: The most favorable business class option on Aer Lingus between the United States and Ireland is aboard the 757. This aircraft has the most private business class cabin and the largest seats. The second place winner is the A330-200, followed by the A330-300, which has the largest business class cabin and smallest seats.

Aer Lingus Premium Economy Class Options

Unfortunately, Aer Lingus doesn’t offer an option to fly premium economy on any flights between the United States and Ireland.

Aer Lingus Economy Class Options

Aer Lingus 757 Economy. Image courtesy of wallseat.co
Aer Lingus 757 economy class. Image courtesy of wallseat.co.

Aer Lingus is famous for offering some of the most affordable economy tickets to Ireland and onwards to Europe if you’re willing to take connecting flights.

The seats aren’t the biggest economy seats in the world, but you can make your ride more comfortable by reserving the right seats on the right plane. Our economy class ranking is as follows:

  • 757
  • A330-200
  • A330-300

Aer Lingus 757 Economy Class

As we mentioned above, the 757 is a narrow-body aircraft, which will have fewer seats compared to the A330.

Each of the 165 economy seats are 18 inches wide and 31 inches in pitch, with each row featuring a 3-3 configuration. Here’s what the seat map looks like:

Aer Lingus 757 Economy Class Seat Map
Aer Lingus 757 economy class seat map. Image courtesy of seatguru.com.

The best seats in economy are typically located in exit rows due to the extra legroom afforded to passengers seated there.

In this case, the exit rows are located at rows 7 and 24. Row 24 is less than ideal due to the close proximity to the lavatories. Furthermore, the exit row protrusion at 7A and 7F will restrict leg movement for those seats.

As a result, the best seats are 7B/C and 7D/E. You’ll have more legroom and be located at the front of the plane, which can go a long way in making your economy flight more enjoyable.

You can find this Aer Lingus’ 757 economy class seating arrangement on the following routes between Ireland and the United States:

  • Hartford (BDL) – Dublin (DUB)
  • New York City (JFK) – Shannon (SNN)
  • Philadelphia (PHL) – Dublin (DUB)
  • Washington D.C. (IAD) – Dublin (DUB)
  • Chicago (ORD) – Dublin (DUB) sometimes

Aer Lingus A330-200 Economy Class

Whereas the 757 has 165 economy class seats, the A330-200 has almost 50% more, for a total of 243 seats in economy.

Each of these seats are slightly narrower and slightly longer. The A330-200 seats are 17 inches wide and 31-32 inches in pitch compared to the 757 economy seats, which are each 18 inches wide and 31 inches in pitch.

The A330-200 has seats arranged in a 2-4-2 configuration as shown here:

Aer Lingus A330-200 Economy Class Seat Map
Aer Lingus A330-200 economy class seat map. Image courtesy of seatguru.com.

The exit row seats are located at rows 11 and 29. Row 11 seats are the best in this case, specifically seats 11A and 11C. This is because the seats are located on the opposite side of the lavatory. Instead, there’s only a galley near 11A and 11C.

If you can’t reserve 11A or 11C on Aer Lingus’ A330-200, you can try aiming for the bassinet seats at 11D/E/G to avoid the lavatories.

If those are taken, I would then choose 11H/K, followed by seats in row 29.

You can find the A330-200 on these Aer Lingus routes to and from the United States:

  • Los Angeles (LAX) – Dublin (DUB) sometimes
  • Miami (MIA) – Dublin (DUB)
  • Seattle (SEA) – Dublin (DUB) mostly
  • Orlando (MCO) – Dublin (DUB) sometimes
  • Newark (EWR) – Dublin (DUB) sometimes
  • San Francisco (SFO) – Dublin (DUB) sometimes

Aer Lingus A330-300 Economy Class

Our last place winner goes to the Aer Lingus A330-300, which is essentially a more crowded version of the A330-200. The seats are the same design and size, only there are more of them.

Aer Lingus’ A330-300 has 287 economy seats, whereas their A330-200 has 243. The 2-4-2 configuration remains the same, the positioning of the lavatories and galleys is the main difference.

Check out the seat layout below:

Aer Lingus A330-300 Economy Class Seat Map
Aer Lingus A330-300 economy class seat map. Image courtesy of seatguru.com.

The best seats in this layout are in rows 8 and 30. Fortunately, there are no lavatories near row 8 and the lavatories nearby row 30 are significantly further from the seats than normal.

Those traveling as a couple should pick 2 seats on a single side of the aircraft in the exit rows to maximize comfort.

You’ll be able to find the A330-300 flown by Aer Lingus on these routes between Ireland and the United States:

  • Boston (BOS) – Dublin (DUB)
  • New York City (JFK) – Dublin (DUB)
  • Chicago (ORD) – Dublin (DUB) mostly
  • Seattle (SEA) – Dublin (DUB) sometimes
  • Orlando (MCO) – Dublin (DUB) mostly
  • Los Angeles (LAX) – Dublin (DUB) mostly
  • Newark (EWR) – Dublin (DUB) mostly
  • San Francisco (SFO) – Dublin (DUB) mostly

Final Thoughts

Aer Lingus provides great options for travelers to get to Ireland without requiring positioning flights, especially in the Northeastern United States.

For example, their network in cities like Hartford (BDL) and Philadelphia (PHL) avoids the necessity to transit through Boston (BOS), New York City (JFK), or Washington D.C. (IAD).

There’s a clear hierarchy of business class seats on any given Aer Lingus aircraft, and it will always be in the traveler’s best interest to book the throne seats. Keep in mind that these are competitive, and the window seats are a suitable consolation prize.

As far as economy goes, the design of the economy section goes a long way in dictating which rows of seats are best for travelers.

Lastly, Aer Lingus recently disclosed their plans to add the A321LR from Dublin to Hartford (BDL) and Philadelphia (PHL) starting August 2, 2019 and September 1, 2019, respectively. When the product is rolled out, we will add these options into the guide.

Now, you have the insider’s guide on Aer Lingus’ U.S. routes.


Featured Image Credit: Shutterstock.com

FAQ

What's the best way to book Aer Lingus first class?

Unfortunately, there are currently no options offered by Aer Lingus to fly first class between the United States and Ireland.

What's the best ways to book Aer Lingus business class?

Aer Lingus business class is one of the biggest sweet spots for using points and miles, especially from the East Coast of the United States.

You can use British Airways Avios to book travel on Aer Lingus, though you’ll need to call them to actually book the ticket.

British Airways uses a distance-based award chart, some sweet spots include Boston (BOS) to Dublin (DUB) in off-peak business class for 31,250 Avios one way. This is a steal because Aer Lingus usually charges 50,000 Avios for the same flight!

If you pair this with transfer bonuses from American Express (up to 40%), then you can get a 6-hour business class flight for 22,321 Amex points.

With Aer Lingus Avios, you can fly to and from San Francisco, Seattle, or Los Angeles for 62,500 Avios during off-peak dates.

Check out our guide on how to best redeem Aer Lingus Avios for more information.

What are the best ways to book Aer Lingus premium economy class?

Unfortunately, there are currently no options to fly Aer Lingus premium economy.

What's the best ways to book Aer Lingus economy class?

Aer Lingus charges 13,000 Avios each way in economy for all routes except Dublin (DUB) to Los Angeles (LAX), San Francisco (SFO), Seattle (SEA), Miami (MIA), and Orlando (MCO). They charges 16,250 Avios for the longer routes.

When using BA Avios, this sweet spot costs 10,000 Avios off-peak and 12,500 Avios during peak: Boston (BOS) – Dublin (DUB).

Stephen Au

About Stephen Au

Born and raised in Los Angeles, Stephen has been privileged to enjoy many premium cabin products and 5-star hotels, thanks to his love for travel hacking. A petroleum engineer by trade, Stephen caught the travel bug in college when he traveled to Asia several times. Within 2 years, Stephen has earned millions of points and miles, enjoyed several business class cabins, and stayed in luxury hotel suites in 14 countries.

Advertisement

Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

Disclaimer: Any comments listed below are not from the bank advertiser, nor have they been reviewed or approved by them. No responsibility will be taken by the bank advertiser for these comments.

Leave a comment

Email needed if you'd like comment updates. It will NOT be published.

Advertiser Disclosure

Many of the credit card offers that appear on this site are from credit card companies from which we receive compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. For more information on our advertisers, see here.