The Definitive Guide to ANA’s Direct Routes From the U.S. [Plane Types and Seat Options]

All Nippon Airways Plane

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All Nippon Airways, abbreviated as ANA, is the largest airline in Japan. There are a ton of tourist attractions in Japan, and it’s no secret that flying to Japan is at the top of many travelers’ bucket lists.

In addition, Japan is well-known for amazing Michelin Star-quality food, a ridiculously hospitable culture, and some of the cleanest facilities in the world. And what better way to fly there than on All Nippon Airways’ premium cabins?

While many of their different first and business class products are similar, there are quite a few nuances due to the various aircraft used by ANA. To help you get a handle on them, here’s our definitive guide to ANA U.S. routes.

We’ll talk about the different aircraft utilized by ANA, along with seating options, cabin class offerings, and flight frequencies. Over the course of the guide, we’ll rank the various seat options by cabin class and illustrate the routes you can take to fly ANA’s best products.

ANA Seat Options by Aircraft Type

ANA is a bit more standardized than European carriers like Air France and Lufthansa. They operate a consistent fleet of planes on the same routes:

ANA Route Flight No.AircraftCabin ClassesFrequency
New York City (JFK) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)NH 9777-300ER (264 seats)

Sometimes: New 777-300ER

First, Business, Premium Economy, EconomyDaily
New York City (JFK) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)NH 109777-300ER (212 seats)First, Business, Premium Economy, EconomyDaily
Los Angeles (LAX) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)

{1 flight moving to Tokyo-Haneda from March 29, 2020}

NH 175/NH 5777-300ER (264 seats)First, Business, Premium Economy, Economy2x daily until March 29, 2020, then daily
Los Angeles (LAX) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)NH 105

{NH 125 from March 29, 2020}

777-300ER (264 seats)First, Business, Premium Economy, EconomyDaily until March 29, 2020; from March 29, 2020, 2x daily
Honolulu (HNL) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)NH 181/183NH 183: A380

NH 181: A380

A380: First, Business, Premium Economy, EconomyNH 183: Daily

NH 181: 3x weekly

Honolulu (HNL) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)NH 185787-9Business, Premium Economy, EconomyDaily
San Francisco (SFO) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)NH 7777-300ER (264 seats)First, Business, Premium Economy, EconomyDaily
San Francisco (SFO) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND) 

{from summer 2020}

TBATBATBATBA
San Jose (SJC) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)

{moving to Tokyo-Haneda (HND) from March 29, 2020}

NH 171

{NH 119 from March 29, 2020}

787-8Business, Premium Economy, EconomyDaily
Seattle (SEA) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)

{moving to Tokyo-Haneda (HND) from March 29, 2020}

NH 177

{NH 117 from March 29, 2020}

787-8Business, Premium Economy, EconomyDaily
Chicago (ORD) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)NH 11777-300ER (264 seats)First, Business, Premium Economy, EconomyDaily
Chicago (ORD) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)NH 111777-300ER (264 seats)First, Business, Premium Economy, EconomyDaily
Washington D.C. (IAD) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)

{moving to Tokyo-Haneda (HND) from March 29, 2020}

NH 1

{NH 101 from March 29, 2020}

777-300ER (264 seats)First, Business, Premium Economy, EconomyDaily
Houston (IAH) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)

{moving to Tokyo-Haneda (HND) from March 29, 2020}

NH 173

{NH 113 from March 29, 2020}

777-300ER (264 seats)First, Business, Premium Economy, EconomyDaily

Best Points to Earn to Fly ANA

ANA is a Star Alliance partner. This means you can use miles from airlines like United, Air Canada, etc. to book your award travel on ANA. In addition, you can use non-alliance partners such as Virgin Atlantic and Etihad.

The biggest sweet spot for flying on ANA is using Virgin Atlantic miles — you can fly first class round-trip from the West Coast for only 110,000 miles! Best of all, Virgin Atlantic partners with 4 major transferable currencies, so you’ll have no shortage of ways to earn Virgin Atlantic miles:

If you don’t like Virgin Atlantic, you can also use ANA Mileage Club, which partners with American Express Membership Rewards and Marriott. You’ll have great business class redemption rates, especially when flying during low season. You’ll also have increased access to award availability from ANA.

Other options include using Air Canada Aeroplan miles, United MileagePlus miles, Asiana Club, and Avianca LifeMiles.

ANA First Class Options

ANA New 777-300ER First Class

ANA New 777 The Suite First Class Cabin
ANA New 777-300ER The Suite first class cabin. Image Credit: All Nippon Airways

All Nippon Airways recently unveiled their brand-new 777-300ER, which contains the widest first class seat and one of the largest first class seats in the world. This move caught most of the aviation world by surprise since ANA was doing this under the radar and invested no money into marketing this new product.

Nonetheless, the ANA New 777-300ER is undoubtedly the best first class product they have ever created. Each of these seats is nicknamed “The Suite” and features beautiful wooden finishes, a cool dark-blue theme, and understated luxury. The Suite has state-of-the-art technology, sliding doors, and more.

ANA New 777-300ER First Class Seat Map
ANA New 777-300ER first class seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

The first class cabin is located at the front of the plane across 2 rows of seats in a 1-2-1 configuration. In this sense, the new and old first class seats have the same layout of 8 seats. That’s pretty much where the similarities end.

These gargantuan new seats are 38 inches wide, 76 inches in pitch, and 76 inches long in bed mode. That means that ANA’s new 777-300ER first class suites are an entire 2 inches wider than the now second-widest seat, Cathay Pacific’s 777-300ER first class.

You’ll find this product sporadically on these ANA routes:

  • New York City (JFK) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) on NH 9 sometimes
  • Tokyo-Haneda (HND) – New York City (JFK) on NH 110 sometimes

As you can probably tell, the roll-out will be gradual. In order to tell if you’re flying on the new 777-300ER, you need to look at the business class seat map. If your business class cabin goes all the way to row 20 and not row 17 or 21, you’re on the new 777-300ER.

ANA 777-300ER First Class

Let’s talk about the older 777-300ER. It’s known as ANA’s flagship aircraft and is operated on the most high-profile, high-demand routes. It’s also the product we’re discussing when we talk about The ANA First Square.

ANA First Class Cabin, Boeing 777,
ANA first class is very private and luxurious. Image Credit: Alex Miller

Even though it’s not the brand-new product, ANA first class on the “old” 777-300ER is a symbol of Japanese luxury and hospitality. If I had to describe it in a word, I’d say it’s practical. ANA constructed their older first class seats as boxes — in fact, they call their flagship first class product “The ANA First Square.”

You’ll enjoy a ton of privacy at your seat — with large partitions/walls separating passengers from each other, it’s very possible you’ll never see another passenger during your flight.

On top of that, the storage compartments at your seat are nearly endless — in fact, ANA has chosen to block 2 windows in exchange for additional compartments you’d never see otherwise. Whether or not you agree with this move, it’s consistent with ANA’s perceived goal of being the most utilitarian first class seat out there.

The seat map looks like this:

ANA 777-300 (264) First Class Seat Map
ANA 777-300 first class seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

ANA operates 2 versions of the 777-300ER: one that’s premium-heavy and seats up to 212 people, and one that’s lighter on premium seats, flying up to 264 people. But the first class cabins are identical, so we can lump them together for this analysis.

All first class seats feature an amazing 33-inch width and 76-inch pitch/bed length. The first class seats are arranged in 2 rows with a 1-2-1 configuration, for a total of 8 seats per plane.

These armchairs in first class are super wide, so you definitely won’t have any problems sprawling out and lounging in your seat. You’ll also enjoy masterful Japanese fine-dining along with stellar service.

Hot Tip: Need help booking? Check out our guide on the best ways to book ANA first class.

Let’s look at the routes that offer ANA first class on the 777-300ER:

  • New York City (JFK) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • New York City (JFK) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)
  • Los Angeles (LAX) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)
  • Los Angeles (LAX) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • San Francisco (SFO) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)
  • San Francisco (SFO) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • Chicago (ORD) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • Chicago (ORD) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)
  • Washington, D.C. (IAD) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) until March 29, 2020, then Washington D.C. (IAD) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • Houston (IAH) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) until March 29, 2020, then Houston (IAH) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)

As you can see, there are plenty of routes, especially from major international U.S. hubs going to both Tokyo-Narita and Tokyo-Haneda.

ANA A380 First Class

ANA A380 First Class Seat 2A
ANA A380 First Class Seat 2A. Image Credit: Cherag Dubash

Now let’s pivot to the ANA A380 first class, an offering for select flights to/from Hawaii. Hawaii has a deep connection with Japan, so it makes sense that ANA would expand its route network to include even more Hawaiian flights.

As such, they have decided to unveil the first A380s in their fleet on these flights to Hawaii. Here’s how the seats look:

ANA A380 First Class Seat
ANA A380 First Class Seat. Image Credit: Cherag Dubash

Honestly, the differences between the 777-300ER first class and the new A380 first class aren’t that many. The sliding doors that enclose your seat make it more of a “suite,” and the new cabin finishes look pretty sleek.

Another added benefit is that the partition in middle seats can be lowered, so you’ll be able to talk to your seat-mate more easily.

Again, these seats will be in the same exact configuration as the 777-300ER: 2 rows of 4 seats each in a 1-2-1 configuration. Later this year, you’ll be able to find ANA A380 routes here:

  • Honolulu (HNL) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) on NH 183 daily
  • Honolulu (HNL) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) on NH 181 3x weekly

Bottom Line: In theory, ANA’s A380 first class has the best hard product: it’s newer with sliding doors and a retractable partition. In practice, however, the route options are so limited that it won’t be useful for many U.S. travelers unless you’re flying to/from Hawaii.

ANA Business Class Options

Now that we’ve been briefed on ANA first class products, let’s talk about one of the biggest sweet spots in the points and miles world: ANA business class.

In order from best to worst (at least in our opinion), these 5 ANA business class products are:

  1. New 777-300ER
  2. 777-300ER (264 seats)
  3. 777-300ER (212 seats)
  4. A380
  5. 787-9
  6. 787-8

All ANA business class seats are in a staggered 1-2-1 configuration.

ANA New 777-300ER Business Class

ANA New 777 The Room Business Class
ANA New 777-300ER The Room business class. Image Credit: All Nippon Airways

When ANA started operating their new 777-300ER, it wasn’t the first class seat that took the world by storm. It was business class. With a moniker “The Room,” this business class seat is gigantic.

In business class, each seat is 35 inches wide, 53 inches in pitch, and 72 inches long in bed mode. The most important thing to note is the fact that a business class seat is 35 inches wide. This means that it’s just 1 inch short of Cathay Pacific first class, the former widest seat in the world.

In other words, ANA’s new business class seat is 1 inch narrower than Cathay Pacific first class. That is a truly jaw-dropping proposition, and ANA stunned the aviation world in that regard.

Each row alternates between forward- and rear-facing seats. With a total of 64 business class seats across 16 rows in a 1-2-1 configuration, this section is huge. ANA’s new 777-300ER business class is arranged across 3 mini-cabins as shown below:

ANA New 777-300ER Business Class Seat Map
ANA New 777-300ER business class seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

The best seats for solo travelers are 5A, 5K, 19A, and 19K. These seats, in particular, are true window seats in the mini-cabin, which means it’ll be quiet, private, and have minimal foot traffic. Couples traveling together will want to reserve middle seats in the odd rows, due to the fact that you’ll be closer to your seatmate compared to even row middle seats.

Hot Tip: Want to always select the best seat on your flight? Learn how with our SeatGuru guide!

You can find these seats on this route:

  • New York City (JFK) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) on NH 9 sometimes
  • Tokyo-Haneda (HND) – New York City (JFK) on NH 110 sometimes

ANA 777-300ER Business Class

ANA Business Class Seat 2
Enjoy the comfort of ANA business class. Image Credit: Stephen Au

There are a lot of business class products you can try — while the seats are similar for the most part, the seat maps are different, resulting in different preferential seat numbers.

The 264-seat 777-300ER (264 seats) is our winner because this aircraft is light on premium seats, which will afford more privacy to travelers in business class. Each seat measures 21 inches wide and 62 inches in pitch. 

The seat map looks like this:

ANA 777-300 (264) Business Class Seat Map
ANA 777-300 (264) business class seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

As usual, we always want to follow the mantra of avoiding crowds and staying away from the lavatories and galleys. In this case, the best seat for solo travelers is 5A, while the best seats for couples would be in 5D and 5F.

In this mini-cabin of only 2 rows, no one will be walking near you, and the lavatories and galleys are far enough away that you won’t notice them. However, you’ll want to avoid rows 6 and 7 due to their proximity to the lavatories and galleys.

Most of the U.S. routes utilize the 777-300ER, so you’ll have plenty of options to plan your trip. You’ll be able to find this premium-light configuration here:

  • New York City (JFK) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)
  • Los Angeles (LAX) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)
  • Los Angeles (LAX) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • San Francisco (SFO) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)
  • Chicago (ORD) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)
  • Chicago (ORD) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • Washington, D.C. (IAD) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) until March 29, 2020, then Washington D.C. (IAD) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • Houston (IAH) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) until March 29, 2020, then Houston (IAH) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)

Hot Tip: Want to know the best ways to book ANA business class? Check out our in-depth guide here. And read more about the in-flight experience in our review of ANA 777-300ER business class.

Let’s move on to our runner-up, which is the premium-heavy 777-300ER that can seat 212 passengers. The seats are identical in size — but instead of 52 business class lie-flat seats, there are 68 in this arrangement.

Here’s the seat map:

ANA 777-300 (212) Business Class Seat Map
ANA 777-300 (212) business class seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

One interesting thing is that the 68 seats are organized into 3 cabins as shown above. The best seats are the same as on the premium-light 777-300ER we talked about right before this: solo travelers should shoot for 5A, and the best couple seats are 5D and 5F.

You’ll be able to find these seats on this sole route to/from the U.S.:

  • New York City (JFK) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)

Hot Tip: If you want to maximize your probability of snatching award availability and you’re willing to buy a positioning flight to New York, looking for a premium-heavy aircraft is probably the best way to go. 

ANA A380 Business Class

The third-place winner in our ANA business class ranking is the A380 — which will probably have the best hard product but will be impractical for most of us who aren’t flying from Hawaii. Here’s what the A380 business class seats are supposed to look like:

ANA A380 Business Class
ANA A380 business class. Image Credit: All Nippon Airways

There are going to be a total of 56 business class seats spread out across 14 rows in a 1-2-1 configuration, as usual. Interestingly, all these seats are going to be in 1 giant business class cabin, as shown below:

ANA A380 Business Class Seat Map
ANA A380 business class seat map. Image Credit: All Nippon Airways

The lavatories are located at the back of the cabin, while the galleys and inflight bar are located at the front. I expect the best seats to be 7A or 7K for solo travelers and 7E/F for those with a companion. 

Unfortunately, these seats rank third due to the very limited route offerings:

  • Honolulu (HNL) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) on NH 181
  • Honolulu (HNL) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) on NH 183

Hopefully, this will change in the future, but there’s never any guarantee.

ANA 787-9 Business Class

Let’s move on to our Dreamliners. ANA uses 2 787s, and the first one we’re going to talk about is the newer 787-9. This is a 3-class aircraft featuring business, premium economy, and economy.

Their business class seats measure 21 inches wide and 62 inches in pitch, which is identical to the seats on the 777-300ER.

There are a total of 40 business class seats on the 787-9 arranged into 2 mini-cabins:

ANA 787-9 Business Class Seat Map
ANA 787-9 business class seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

As always, you want to be in the mini-cabin and far from the lavatories. For solo travelers on the 787-9, this means seats 11A or 10K. For couples traveling together, it’ll be in 11D/F.

The 787-9 is flown on non-flagship routes, including those to the U.S. (currently only on routes to/from Hawaii, so very limited):

  • Honolulu (HNL) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) on NH 183 and 181 until May 23 and June 30, respectively.
  • Honolulu (HNL) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)

ANA 787-8 Business Class

ANA’s very last business class product to the United States is on the 787-8. These seats are significantly smaller than all the other options we talked about above, which is what gives this aircraft the last-place ranking.

These 787-8 business class seats measure 19.4 inches wide and 59 inches in pitch. The 46 seats are all lie-flat, which is still good news. Here’s what the seat map looks like:

ANA 787-8 Business Class Seat Map
ANA 787-8 business class seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

The best seats on the 787-8 are in rows 1 and 13. Row 1 is “close” to the front lavatories, but there’s such a distance between them that it won’t really hinder your experience. The seat faces away from the aisle and toward the window, making it very private.

As you’ll also notice, all odd row seats on the side are truly window seats, whereas all even row seats on the side are aisle seats. For additional privacy, choose the window seats in even-numbered rows.

Row 13 is also a good choice since the lavatories and other seats are all in front of the cabin to minimize foot traffic. The only foreseeable problem would be some noise from the bassinet seats at the front of premium economy.

The added benefit of flying on the 787-8 is route flexibility. These routes may be geographically advantageous for some travelers:

  • San Jose (SJC) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) until March 29, 2020, then San Jose (SJC) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • Seattle (SEA) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) until March 29, 2020, then Seattle (SEA) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)

Bottom Line: There are quite a few products to keep track of in ANA business class, but you’ll be glad you took the time to figure out the optimal seats and aircraft.

ANA Premium Economy Options

ANA Premium Economy
ANA premium economy. Image Credit: SeatGuru

Next let’s check out our options for flying ANA premium economy, which can be a solid compromise between preserving as many miles as possible and maximizing your inflight comfort.

Here are the planes that offer a premium economy cabin, ranked in order with our favorite at the top:

  1. 787-9
  2. A380
  3. 787-8
  4. 777-300ER (212 seats)
  5. New 777-300ER
  6. 777-300ER (264 seats)

The first place prize here goes to the ANA 787-9, which features premium economy seats that are 19.3 inches wide with a 38-inch pitch. There are only 14 seats spread out across 2 rows, and they’re 7 abreast in a 2-3-2 configuration.

This is an astonishingly private premium economy cabin, which is why it took the winning spot. The seat map looks like this:

ANA 787-9 Premium Economy Class Seat Map
ANA 787-9 premium economy class seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

Importantly, the seats in row 15 have extra legroom but are also bassinet seats. You may want to choose those for extra room, but keep in mind there might also be extra noise.

You’ll find the 787-9 on these key Hawaii routes:

  • Honolulu (HNL) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • Honolulu (HNL) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) on NH 181 and 183 until June 30 and May 23, respectively.

Our next spot goes to the premium economy seats on the A380, which is reported to have 73 seats in a 2-3-2 configuration. While the exact seat dimensions haven’t been released yet, I suspect these A380 premium economy seats will be the largest since the aircraft is much bigger than the 787.

However, this is all hearsay at the moment, which is why we’re ranking it in second place. This is what the seats are supposed to look like:

ANA A380 Premium Economy
ANA A380 premium economy. Image Credit: SeatGuru

These premium economy seats look very comfortable, spacious, and well-adorned with amenities. You can find them on ANA’s A380 service to Hawaii:

  • Honolulu (HNL) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) NH 181 3x from July 1
  • Honolulu (HNL) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) NH 183 3x weekly from May 24-June 30, increasing to daily from July 1

Next up is third place: the premium economy on ANA’s 787-8. These seats are exactly the same size, but instead of having 14 seats like the 787-9, there’s an additional row of 7 seats in the same 2-3-2 arrangement for a total premium economy cabin of 21 seats.

The seat map looks like this:

ANA 787-8 Premium Economy Class Seat Map
ANA 787-8 premium economy class seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

Since the lavatories are located in the back of the cabin, you’ll want to reserve a seat as far as possible from that. This means that seats in row 15 are going to be the best option on the 787-8.

You’ll find this premium economy cabin on all 787-8 routes to/from America, which are:

  • San Jose (SJC) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) until March 29, 2020, then San Jose (SJC) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • Seattle (SEA) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) until March 29, 2020, then Seattle (SEA) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)

The next airplane we’ll look at is the premium-heavy 777-300ER with seating capacity for 212. These seats are arranged in a 2-4-2 configuration, so it’s slightly denser, even though the seat dimensions are identical to the 787’s we just discussed.

Still, the 8 seats abreast make this a slightly less palatable option. The seat map looks as follows:

ANA 777-300 (212) Premium Economy Class Seat Map
ANA 777-300 (212) premium economy class seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

The only “good” seats are in row 26. Row 25 seats are located at the bulkhead, which in this case will limit your legroom. Row 27 seats are close to the galley and lavatories, which is not ideal.

Find the premium-heavy 777-300ER on this route:

  • New York City (JFK) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)

The new 777-300ER premium economy configuration is almost identical to the 777-300ER (212-seat) arrangement. The only exception is that there are no lavatories located near the premium economy section. The seat map looks like this:

ANA New 777-300ER Premium Economy Class Seat Map
ANA New 777-300ER premium economy class seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

There isn’t much difference between seats, but you’ll find this configuration on this route:

  • New York City (JFK) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) on NH 9 sometimes
  • Tokyo-Haneda (HND) – New York City (JFK) on NH 110 sometimes

Finally, our last place spot goes to the premium-light 777-300ER with a seating capacity for 264 passengers. The premium economy seats on this 777-300ER (264 seats) are significantly smaller, at 18.5 inches wide and 38 inches in pitch — so you’ll have less shoulder room and legroom.

Unfortunately, the premium-light 777-300ER is flown on most routes to/from the United States, so you may need to deal with it if you choose not to buy a positioning flight.

Here’s the seat map:

ANA 777-300 (264) Premium Economy Class Seat Map
ANA 777-300 (264) premium economy class seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

The best seats are going to be in row 20, as it is furthest from the lavatory and therefore the quietest and most pleasant.

As we said earlier, you’ll find this 777-300ER (264) seat layout on most of the routes to/from America:

  • New York City (JFK) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)
  • Chicago (ORD) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)
  • Chicago (ORD) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • San Francisco (SFO) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)
  • San Francisco (SFO) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • Los Angeles (LAX) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)
  • Los Angeles (LAX) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • Washington, D.C. (IAD) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) until March 29, 2020, then Washington D.C. (IAD) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • Houston (IAH) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) until March 29, 2020, then Houston (IAH) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)

ANA Economy Options

ANA Economy
ANA economy. Image Credit: All Nippon Airways

Our last discussion will be on ANA’s coach class, and whether any subtle differences exist between the seat types. Here’s our ranking:

  1. 787-9
  2. 787-8
  3. A380-800
  4. 777-300ER (264)
  5. New 777-300ER
  6. 777-300ER (212)

First, let’s talk about the 787-9 economy seats, which measure 17.3 inches wide and 34 inches in pitch — the best dimensions of any ANA economy seat.

The 192 seats on the 787-9 are arranged in a 3-3-3 configuration, with the best seats being in rows 20 or 28. This is due to the extra legroom from the exit row or bassinet.

In the case of row 28, keep in mind that you’ll be right next to the galley and lavatories, so it’ll be noisier — though it might be worth it for the extra legroom. Just avoid 28A and 28K due to the protruding exit row door.

Here’s what the seat map looks like:

ANA 787-9 Economy Class Seat Map
ANA 787-9 economy class seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

You’ll find the 787-9 on these routes:

  • Honolulu (HNL) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) on NH 181 and 183 until June 30 and May 23, respectively.
  • Honolulu (HNL) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)

Next, we move onto the 787-8, which has a much smaller cabin size of 102 seats. The seats are closer together, with a 31-inch pitch compared to the 787-9’s 34 inches. But the seat width is the same at 17.3 inches, which is a big plus.

The economy class cabin in the 787-8 consists mostly of 3-3-3 rows as follows:

ANA 787-8 Economy Seat Map
ANA 787-8 economy seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

You’ll also notice that seats 30A/C are in a row by themselves, which may be great for couples traveling together. The big drawback is you’re going to be all the way in the back of the plane.

If you don’t want to sit in the back of the plane, try reserving seats in row 20, which are close to the lavatories (but might be worth it if you want the extra legroom). But remember that in 20A or 20K, the exit door will infringe on your personal space.

The 787-8 is flown on these routes:

  • Seattle (SEA) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) until March 29, 2020, then Seattle (SEA) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • San Jose (SJC) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) until March 29, 2020, then San Jose (SJC) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)

The A380-800 is our next best choice. Each of the 343 economy seats measures 32-34 inches in seat pitch and 17 inches wide. Although they’re a tiny bit narrower compared to the 787-8, the seat pitch is better, resulting in ease of stretching out your legs. The seats are arranged in a 3-4-3 configuration across the entire lower deck of the plane as follows:

ANA A380 Economy Seat Map
ANA A380 economy seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

The best seats are in rows 35, 58, and 70, due to the presence of the exit rows. Just be sure to avoid the window seats, as the exit row will protrude into your feet space. You’ll find the A380 flown on:

  • Honolulu (HNL) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) on NH 183 daily
  • Honolulu (HNL) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) on NH 181 3x weekly

The next option we’ll be discussing is the  777-300ER with 264 seats, 180 of which are economy seats. These individual seats each measure 17 inches wide and 31 inches in pitch.

Compared to the second place 787-8, these seats are narrower by 0.3 inches. Compared to the first place 787-9, these seats are narrower by 0.3 inches and shorter in pitch by a full 3 inches.

The seats are mostly arranged in a 3-4-3 configuration, as you can see in the following seat map:

ANA 777-300ER (264) economy class seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

There are a couple of preferential seats here. The sides of rows 39 to 41 offer an arrangement of just 2 seats together, so you’ll want to pick those when traveling with a partner (even if it’s in the back of the plane).

Seats in row 30 might also be preferable due to the exit row location; just dodge 30A and 30K due to the exit door protrusion.

You’ll find these seats on most routes to/from America. Here is the list:

  • Chicago (ORD) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • Chicago (ORD) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)
  • Washington, D.C. (IAD) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) until March 29, 2020, then Washington D.C. (IAD) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • Houston (IAH) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) until March 29, 2020, then Houston (IAH) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • New York City (JFK) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)
  • San Francisco (SFO) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)
  • San Francisco (SFO) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)
  • Los Angeles (LAX) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT)
  • Los Angeles (LAX) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)

Moving onto the second-last choice, let’s talk about the new 777-300ER. The seats are arranged in a 3-4-3 configuration, each featuring 17 inches in seat width and 31 inches in seat pitch. There are a total of 116 seats in economy as shown here:

ANA New 777-300ER Economy Class Seat Map
ANA New 777-300ER economy class seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

As you can also see, the seat configuration becomes 2-4-2 towards the back of the plane. 30B/C and 30H/J are the most preferential seats, as the exit row will enable you to stretch out your legs as much as possible. Just be sure to avoid 30A and 30K due to the protrusion of the exit row door.

You can find this route on:

  • New York City (JFK) – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) on NH 9 sometimes
  • Tokyo-Haneda (HND) – New York City (JFK) on NH 110 sometimes

Our very last economy seat is on the premium-heavy 777-300ER, which is the least ideal. These seats are the narrowest at 16.5 inches in width and 34 inches in pitch.

Though the pitch is actually tied with our first place economy product, these seats are significantly narrower. Because width is so important for many travelers, the premium-heavy 777-300ER falls in last place.

Its seating map looks like this:

ANA 777-300 (212) Economy Class Seat Map
ANA 777-300 (212) economy class seat map. Image Credit: SeatGuru

Interestingly, this configuration is predominantly a 2-4-3 arrangement. You’ll probably want seats on the left side of the aircraft; we suggest row 30 due to the exit room arrangement.

You’ll find this on the sole premium-heavy 777 route to America:

  • New York City (JFK) – Tokyo-Haneda (HND)

Final Thoughts

ANA is an airline with an outstanding reputation in the aviation industry. They have amazing first and business class products and present one of the best ways to fly to Japan.

Their seat differences can be quite subtle across airplanes, routes, and even seats within the same plane.

The first class options are on the A380 and 777-300ER (both old and new variants). Because of its limited routes, the A380 (which has the better hard product) falls behind the 777-300ER. The new 777-300ER has the best first and business class product, without a doubt.

ANA’s best premium economy and economy products are on the 787-9.

We hope this guide will help you maximize your experience when booking ANA!


FAQ

What's the best way to book ANA first class?

Virgin Atlantic has a huge sweet spot in this case. You can book from the West Coast in first class for 110,000 Virgin Atlantic miles round-trip! From the East Coast, its 120,000 miles round-trip.

Other options include ANA’s own frequent flyer program, United MileagePlus, and even Air Canada Aeroplan.

For more information, check out our detailed booking guide for booking ANA first class.

What are the best ways to book ANA business class?

Undoubtedly the best way to book ANA business class is using ANA miles. During low season, you can book round-trip business class flights between Japan and the United States for 75,000 miles. This is less than what some airlines charge one-way!

When you book with ANA’s own mileage program, you’ll have additional access to award availability, maximizing your chances of snagging business class.

Virgin Atlantic charges 90,000 miles round-trip from the West Coast and 95,000 miles round-trip from the East Coast to Japan.

Virgin Atlantic is a transfer partner with Chase, American Express, Citi, and Marriott. You’ll be able to pool points much more easily with Virgin Atlantic.

Both ANA and Virgin Atlantic require round-trip bookings, and one-way options include Air Canada Aeroplan and United MileagePlus.

What are the best ways to book ANA premium economy class?

Air Canada Aeroplan charges 62,500 miles one-way for premium economy; it’s pretty much your only option for premium economy awards.

You can’t redeem ANA miles, Virgin Atlantic miles, United miles, or other Star Alliance partners to book ANA premium economy.

What are the best ways to book ANA economy class?

ANA only charges 50,000 miles for round-trip economy. ANA is transfer partners with American Express Membership Rewards and Marriott.

You can also use 70,000 miles round-trip with United MileagePlus or 35,000 miles one-way if you have a lot of Chase Ultimate Rewards points to transfer.

Other options include Avianca LifeMiles, which charges the same as United MileagePlus.

Aeroplan charges slightly more at 75,000 miles round-trip or 37,500 miles one-way.

Stephen Au

About Stephen Au

Born and raised in Los Angeles, Stephen has been privileged to enjoy many premium cabin products and 5-star hotels. A petroleum engineer by trade, Stephen caught the travel bug in college when he traveled to Asia several times. After 2 years of continual promotions, Stephen quit his safe and secure career path in favor of entrepreneurship.

Disclaimer: Any comments listed below are not from the bank advertiser, nor have they been reviewed or approved by them. No responsibility will be taken by the bank advertiser for these comments.

4 comments

  1. Can I fly in and out of two different cities in Japan on ANA using points? For example, flying IAD to Tokyo and Osaka to IAD? Thanks!

    • Hi Beth,

      Yes, you can book an open-jaw award with ANA, but be careful of added fuel surcharges with if your route includesa flight with one of ANAs partner airlines.

      Thanks for reading!

      • Hi Jarrod,

        I was planning on transferring UR points to Virgin Atlantic, then to ANA.
        So you think I could possibly have higher surcharges then just doing a round trip to/from say Tokyo? Or surcharges either way?

        Thanks for the help!

        • Hi Beth,

          You can view how much your fuel surcharges would be exactly by plugging the flights you’re thinking of booking into Googles ITA matrix.

          I would expect round-trip fuel surcharges to be around $3260 regardless of cabin class for a flight between the U.S. and Japan.

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